Landed Estates
NUI Galway

Browse Houses

Search Results: Returned 4893 records. Displaying results 201 – 300

House name Description
Ashbrook In June 1854 William Kelly was recorded as the owner of the property at Ashbrook, formerly Bouilagh, parish of Killaan, barony of Kilconnell. At the time of Griffith's Valuation the house at Ashbrook, valued at £20, was the residence of Charles B. Lynch. It is no longer extant.
Ashbrook An early 18th century house, it was noted by Wilson as the seat of Mr. Moore in 1786. It was occupied by Michael Costello in 1814 and described as in a dilapidated state at the time of the first Ordnance Survey. The Irish Tourist Association file refers to a two-storey plain featured house with the ruins of a small private chapel closeby, which apparently fell into decay in the early 19th century. Some ruins remain at the site.
Ashbury Ashbury, a house valued at £12 in the mid 19th century, was the residence of Timothy Bridge. Members of the Bridge family held the townland from the Earl of Portarlington at this time. The Irish Times reported, in February 1869, that Frederick Bridge had sold lands in the barony of Ikerrin to Rev. Dean Wolseley for over £2000. In the 1870s Edward and Timothy Bridge both of Ashbury owned 191 and 143 acres respectively in county Tipperary.
Ashfield At the time of Griffith's Valuation held by John Kelly in fee when the house was valued at £8. A building still exists at the site.
Ashfield (Tiaquin) IN 1786, Wilson refers to Ashfield as the seat of Mr. Blakeney. On the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map a tree-lined avenue and buildings are shown but not named. None of the buildings are visible today though a portion of the avenue remains.
Ashfield House Occupied by John William Anderson in 1837 and by Denis Downing in the early 1850s who held the property from John Hyde. It was valued at £25. In 1942 the Irish Tourist Association Survey indicated that it was then the residence of William Bowden. This house is still occupied.
Ashfield House Ashfield House was a Persse property. Woodrangers' and workmens' cottages as well as 298 acres constituted this part of the estate. At the time of Griffith's Valuation it was valued at £3. By 1906 it was the property of Capt. A. Persse and was valued at almost £5.
Ashfield House The house at Ashfield seems to have been known as Clooneene, particularly when it was the home of the Blake Forster family. In 1814 it was the home of Francis Blake Forster but by 1837 Lewis records it as in the ownership of D. McNevin. Earlier, in 1786, Wilson wrote that it was the seat of Mr. Forster. Ashfield House is demolished but substantial parts of the walled garden and the gate lodge are still extant.
Ashford Castle Originally a shooting lodge, in the style of a French chateux, built on the shore of Lough Corrib by the Browne family of Castlemagarret and occupied in the late 18th century by a branch of that family. Thomas Elwood was agent for the Brownes in the early 19th century and is recorded as the occupier in 1814. Sold after the Famine to Benjamin Guinness. His son Arthur Lord Ardilaun expanded the building in the style of a Gothic castle. Sold by the Guinness family in 1939 the castle now functions as a world famous hotel.
Ashford Old House At the time of Griffith's Valuation Joseph Sharpe was leasing a property from Dudley Persse, at Ashford, barony of Moycarn. It was accompanied by 350 acres and was valued at £5. In 1814 Leet records Ashford as the residence of John Maher. The 6" and 25"edition OS maps record this as "Ashford Old House".
Ashfort House The home of John Lawder in 1814. Occupied by Hubert K. Waldron in 1837. At the time of Griffith's Valuation occupied by John Hamilton and held from Thomas Goff. Farm buildings exist at the site now. There was a second smaller house known as Ashfort Vale in the same demesne grounds. It is no longer extant.
Ashgrove Lewis records B. Talbot as resident. In 1840 the Ordnance Survey Name Books record that the house derived its name from "a large ash grove, recently cut away". A house valued at £15+ at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was occupied by Reverend Benjamin Talbot and held from Sir John Power. Reverend Benjamin was still resident in the 1870s. Ash Grove is still extant.
Ashgrove In 1786 Wilson refers to Ashgrove as the seat of Mr. Ash. At the time of Griffith's Valuation Ashgrove House was valued at £14.10 shillings and occupied by John Henry Ashe who held it from his brother Trevor Lloyd Ashe. A lithograph of Ashgrove is included in the Ashe sale rental of 1854. It was bought by Charles Moore of Mooresfort. Ashgrove was offered for sale again in 1864. It was held on a lease dated 1815 from Trevor Lloyd Ashe to Southwell Moore for 3 lives renewable for ever. Lyons writes that Southwell Mulcahy was resident from 1858. This house is still in use as a residence.
Ashgrove A home of the Ashe family from at least the 1770s this house was held by Richard Ashe from the Court of Chancery at the time of Griffith's Valuation and was valued at £13.10 shillings. He is also recorded as resident in 1814 and 1837. The sale rental of 1850 records that the house had lately been in the possession of Jeremiah Twomey. This house was owned by Captain Thomas Leader in the 1870s. In 1872 Robert Warren, a younger brother of Sir Augustus Warren, married Blanche Louise, daughter of Captain Leader. Robert Warren, with an address at Ashgrove, Macroom, is also recorded as a county Cork landowner in the 1870s. It is no longer extant though a small number of ruins remain.
Ashgrove Ashgrove was the home of the Upton family in the 18th century. Occupied by John Upton in 1814 and J.W. Upton in 1837. This house was being used as an Auxiliary Workhouse at the time of Griffith's Valuation. William Stephenson held the townland at this time. His interest was advertised for sale in June 1854. The tenant was Mr Denis Moylan who held on a 7 year lease from May 1852. A house is still extant at this site.
Ashgrove A branch of the Rogers family was located at Ashgrove in the early 18th century. Described by Bence Jones as a late Georgian house built for Councillor Franklin by Abraham Hargrave and now a ruin. In 1810 Townsend referred to the new house of Richard Frankland "built in the best modern style". It was occupied in 1814 by Mrs Franklan and in 1837 by R. Frankland. Richard Frankland held the property in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation when the buildings were valued at £32.
Ashgrove Mill John Busteed and Arthur Rowan were the lessors of a house and mill at Tonreagh, vacant at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when the complex was valued at £25 15s.
Ashleypark Ashleypark was occupied by the Heads from at least the 1770s. It was the home of John Head in 1814. It became the seat of a branch of the Atkinson family when purchased by George Guy Atkinson in 1824. G. Atkinson was the proprietor in 1837. George Atkinson held the property in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation when the buildings were valued at £23.10 shillings. Thomas Biggs of the Bellevue family married Alice Margery Atkinson in 1903. The house was valued at £35 and occupied by Thomas B. Biggs Atkinson in 1906. His niece Zelie Biggs eventually inherited Ashleypark. The house was sold to Sean and Nora Mounsey in 1983. It now functions as a guest house.
Ashline Park Robert Mahon son of Charles of Corbally and his wife Rebecca Crowe lived here in the mid 19th century. Griffith's Valuation shows the house valued at £18 and that it was held from the representatives of Michael Finucane. In the 20th century the house was the residence of the Catholic Bishop of Killaloe for some time. Weir writes that it was demolished circa 1968.
Ashpark In 1786 Wilson refers to Ashpark as the seat of Matthew Lyster. By the time of Griffith's Valuation this townland was in the possession of Christopher Hamilton and the most substantial house, valued at £4, was leased from his estate by Patrick Finner. Very little of the buildings are visible on the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s though farm buildings still exist at the site.
Ashroe The Ordnance Survey Name Books record the building of Ashroe House in 1770 for £850. The residence of the Evans family in the late 18th and 19th century, held from Sir Matthew Barrington at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £23+. Wilson mentions it as the seat of Mr. Evans in 1786. The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage suggests modifications were made to the house during the nineteenth century. It is still extant and well-maintained.
Ashton A house occupied by John Cotter from at least 1814 until his death in 1864 and by Mrs Catherine Cotter until at least 1871. It is not clear if John Cotter was a member of the Cotter family, baronets. The house is now part of the Ashton School complex.
Ashton Grove This house is marked Ashton Grove on the first Ordnance Surve map. John Cotter was the proprietor of Ashton, Cork, in 1814 and T. Cleary of Ballingohig in 1837. Thomas J. Cleary held the property from Henry Braddell at the time of Griffith's Valuation when the buildings were valued at £22. Cleary held a cornmill from Braddell in the townland of Kilrussane. James Fitzgerald held 122 acres of untenanted land and buildings valued at £26+ in 1906.
Assolas Built by the Reverend Francis Gore (died 1748) in the early 18th century and occupied by Philip Oliver circa 1750. This house was the home of the Wrixon family from 1774. Occupied by William Harris in 1814 and by Sir William Wrixon Becher in 1837. Richard Smith was resident in the mid 19th century, holding the property then valued at £25+ from Sir William W. Beecher. Owned and run as a guest house by the Bourke family until 2005.
Athassel James Scully was occupying this house at the time of Griffith's Valuation. He held it from Richard Creagh and the buildings were valued at £30. This house is still a residence.
Athasselabbey A house occupied by William Dalton and held from Francis Green in the mid 19th century. The house was valued at £12+. It is still occupied.
Athavallie The house at Moat was the main residence of the Lynch Blosses in the 18th and the early 19th century. In 1786 Wilson refers to Moat, the seat of Sir Henry L. Blosse. A fire destroyed the original house in 1808. It was rebuilt and is marked on the first Ordnance Survey map as Attavally. The Lynch Blosse family were absentee landlords for most of the 19th century. In 1894 the house was recorded as the seat of Sir Henry Lynch-Blosse. Later the house became a community school run by the St Louis nuns. It is now known as Balla Secondary Schoool.
Athenry House Athenry House was built in the late 18th century. In 1837 it was the seat of J. Lopdell. It was offered for sale in the Landed Estates court in November 1876 as part of the estate of Wm. Vesey Fitzgerald Hickman. Part of the original house is no longer extant and construction work has taken place in the area.
Athlacca House A residence of the Ormsby family in the 18th century. On the first Ordnance Survey map the house is marked "in ruins". Also known as Old Court.
Athlunkard House Hamilton Jackson held what was described as a steward's house from Colonel George Wyndham at the time of Griffith's Valuation. It was valued at £14. Weir also describes a house known as Clare Cottage in Athlunkard.
Atlantic Lodge The home of a branch of the Studdert family of Clonderalaw in the mid 19th century held from the Marquis of Conyngham. It was the main residence of Jonas Studdert and was valued at £18 + in the early 1850s. The house is labelled Atlantic House on the 25-inch map of the 1890s and a coastguard station was built to the rear. Modern housing has now been built at the site.
Atteville Both Leet and Lewis indicate that Atteville was the seat of the Knott family with William residing there in 1814. At the time of Griffith's Valuation the property was in the possession of William Phibbs. It is described as a "herd's house" and was valued at almost £2.
Atticorra Brabazon Sharpe was leasing a property valued £20, including a mill, to Patrick Harney. This property was situated at Atticora, barony of Moycarn. A mill is shown at this location on the 1st edition OS map. The ruins of the buildings are still visible at the site.
Attyflin A mid 18th century house, Wilson refers to Atthyflin as the seat of the Westropps in 1786. The house was occupied by Hamilton Jackson at the time of Griffith's Valuation and held from John Westropp. The buildings were valued at £50. In 1943 this house was owned by Mrs A. White, nee Massy Westropp and its contents at this time are described by the Irish Tourist Association surveyor. Home of a branch of the Hewson family in the 20th century. It is still extant.
Attymon House At the time of Griffith's Valuation this house was occupied by Mary Broderick, who later married Lord Dunsandle. It was then valued at £8. In 2008 the current house at this site was offered for sale. The sale details state that it was originally built as a hunting lodge but later extended. See Irish Times 22 May 2008.
Aughavoher House Summer residence of the Gores of Derrymore, held by Edward A. Gore in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation. It is no longer extant.
Aughrim At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Rev. R. Fitzgerald was leasing this property from the Blacker estate when it was valued at £6 and part of a holding of 600 acres. It is described as a Steward's house. Farm buildings still exist at the site.
Aughrim A home of a branch of the Goold family occupied by George Goold in the early 1850s and held from Henry V. Wrixon. The buildings were valued at £13.10 shillings. George Goold still lived here in the 1870s. The house is occupied.
Aughrim Castle The 1st edition Ordnance Survey map indicates a house located a short distance to the north of the site of Aughrim Castle. Lewis records Aughrim Castle as the seat of R. Stanford in 1837. In 1786 Wilson mentions "Aghrim, the seat of the Rev. Mr. Ward". At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Robert Standord was leasing a property from the Handy estate, valued at £15, and which included a mill. It is no longer extant.
Aughry House Aughry House built after the publication of the First Edition Ordnance Survey map. At the time of Griffith's Valuation it was owned and occupied by Charles T. Ward and was valued at £13. Aughry Castle (in ruins) is visible nearby on the 1st edition map. This may be the property referred to in 1786 by Wilson as the seat of Mr. Nesbit. Elaborate modern entrance gates identify Aughry House which appears to be close to the site of the original.
Avena McTernan indicates that this house was originally owned by Robert Culbertson, mill owner of Ballysadare. His property was purchased in the Landed Estates Court in the 1860s by Messers. Middleton and Pollexfen and became a regular residence of Wiliam Middleton. It is still extant and occupied. It was offered for sale in 2020.
Avena House Avena House is associated with the extensive mill owning complex that formerly existed in Ballisadare. It was once part of the property of the Pollexfen family.
Ayle The home of a branch of the Macnamara family in the 18th and 19th centuries. It was advertised for sale in 1850 and Griffith's Valuation records Joseph Browne as the occupier. He held the property in fee, the buildings were valued at £14. Weir writes that the original house was demolished and that the house now standing which was occupied by the Walshes, agents to the Macnamaras, was uninhabited. see http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/article/0,,568230,00.html
Baggotstown The seat of the Bourchier family in the 18th and 19th centuries, valued at £32+ in 1906. The Irish Tourist Association surveyor writes in 1942 that this house was built in 1745 (keystone) and had lately been acquired by Mr T. Mitchell, a solicitor. This house has recently been renovated.
Bahaghs Lodge At the time of Griffith's Valuation, a property here appears to have been leased from Charles O'Connell to the Cahersiveen Board of Guardians for use as an auxiliary workhouse. Bahaghs Lodge is labelled as "in ruins" on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map but is shown as "Bahaghs Lodge" on the later 25-inch Ordnance Survey map. Bary notes that Charles O'Connell is said to have built it in 1833 around the time of his marriage to Katherine O'Connell, daughter of the Liberator. The family were later obliged to leave the property due to financial difficulties. Portions of the ruin now remains.
Baily Ville Situated on the Neville estate this house was built by the Baily family in the mid 19th century. It is marked on the first Ordnance Survey map, circa 1840. By the 1870s Richard Gregg was living in the house which was then known as Oakville. He owned 405 acres in county Cork. Hajba writes that Gregg sold his interest in the property to the Fitzpatricks in the 1880s and this family was still in residence in the early 21st century.
Ballagh The residence of John Kelly in 1814. At the time of Griffith's Valuation, there is no house with a substantial valuation in the townland, which was the property of "Bernard Kelly, a minor, in chancery".
Ballagh In 1814 James O'Connor was residing at Ballagh. Described as a good dwelling house at the time of the first Ordnance Survey. Occupied by Denis O'Conor in the 1850s, held from Theobald Dillon and valued at £6. In 1906 James D. O'Connor occupied Ballagh, valued at £17. It is no longer extant.
Ballaghawbeg Richard Irwin's estate owned a herd's house valued at £2 together with over 400 acres at Ballaghawbeg, barony of Castlereagh, at the time of Griffith's Valuation. The Census of Elphin in 1749 recorded that Charles O'Conor, farmer, held this property at the time. Some ruins exist at the site.
Ballard The residence of John Singleton in 1814. Occupied by Reverend M. Comyn, Parish Priest in 1837 and by John Singleton who held from William Gabbett at the time of Griffith's Valuation. The original house is no longer extant and a modern house occupies the site.
Ballea A At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Thomas Hewitt was leasing this property to Shaw Busteed, when it was valued at almost £10. Buildings are still extant at the site.
Ballea Castle Francis Hodder held this property in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £24 10s. Lewis also refers to it as his seat in 1837. Local sources suggest that It was originally built by the McCarthy family and later acquired by the Hodders. In the 1940s the Irish Tourist Association survey refers to it as being occupied by F. Dorman, retired engineer, and that it was the oldest occupied castle in Éire. Though much altered over the years, it is still extant and occupied.
Ballea Mill Thomas Hewitt was leasing this property to Thomas Sullivan at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £20, including the adjacent mill. The latter property is labelled "in ruins" on the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s.
Ballina Wilson refers to Ballyna as the seat of Mr. Fallon in 1786. Occupied by Malachy Fallon in 1814. It was held in fee by Anthony Fallon at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £6. Occupied by John Duignan in 1906. It is still extant.
Ballina Occupied by Henry Blake at the time of Griffith's Valuation and by Martin J. Blake nephew of Martin Joseph Blake of Ballyglunin, Member of Parliament for the borough of Galway. Now a ruin.
Ballinaboy House A mid 19th century house, home of the Morris family. The townland was held by Anthony Morris at the time of Griffith's Valuation when he owned a house valued at £3 10s. Ballinaboy has been enlarged and is still occupied.
Ballinaboy House In 1837 Lewis describes this house as a "handsome modern mansion surrounded with young and thriving plantations". John Moloney held Ballinaboy House in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £40. Lewis described it as "a handsome modern mansion, the seat of J. Moloney" in 1837. In the early 1940s the Irish Tourist Association survey described it as being "in a good state of preservation" and occupied by a Mr.Tuttle. It is still extant and occupied.
Ballinaclogh A house occupied by William Scully and held by him in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation. The buildings were valued at £11. William Scully (born 1821) of Ballinaclough was the fifth son of Denys Scully of Kilfeakle. He owned 1,354 acres in county Tipperary in the 1870s. Occupied by T.A. Scully in 1906 and valued at £16.
Ballinacurra House Marked on the first Ordnance Survey map and situated on the outskirts of Limerick city this house was occupied by Edmund Palmer at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £23 and held from Patrick O'Shea. Later the home of Hugh Massy. He died at Ballinacurra in 1881. Now in use as an office.
Ballinacurra House (Bandon) In1851 this house was being leased by Joseph Nash from the Devonshire estate, when it had a valuation of £14. There is still an extant house at the site.
Ballinacurra House (Kinsale) Ballinacurra House was held in fee by Mary Bleazby at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £18 5s. In 1786, Wilson refers to "Balnacurragh" as trhe seat of Mr. Swete. It is still extant. In 2021 it was offered for sale.
Ballinafad Bence Jones states that the house was built in 1827 and was sold to the African Missionary Brothers circa 1908 by Lieutenant Colonel Llewellyn Blake of Ballinafad and Cloghballymore, county Galway. It is recorded as his seat in 1894. The Irish Tourist Association File states that the house was donated to the African Missionary Brothers by Colonel Blake and that a new wing was added in 1932. It is currently undergoing restoration.
Ballinahinch A branch of the Molony family appear to have occupied Ballinahinch for some time in the 18th century. Occupied by Cornelius O'Callaghan in 1814 and 1837 and by his son Charles George in the mid to late 19th century. It is recorded as his seat in 1894. By 1906 Ballynahinch mansion house valued at £45 was in the possession of the Gore family. Weir writes that owners left when the "Troubles" began early in the 20th century and the house was vandalised. It was later demolished. The yard buildings remain and are still in use.
Ballinakill Lodge A house built in the early 1840s for the Graham family. Occupied by Minnie Graham in 1906. In 1907 it was accidently burnt and never rebuilt.
Ballinamona A house valued at £11+ on the estate of the Honourable O.F.G. Toler and occupied by Newton Short in the mid 19th century. The Ordnance Survey Name Books refer to it as "a good dwelling house" in 1840. A house is still extant at this location.
Ballinamona Ballinamona was the home of the Murphy family in the 19th century, occupied by William Murphy in 1814 and in 1850. The buildings were valued at £21.15 shillings and held in fee. Edmund William Murphy was resident in 1906.
Ballinamona Park [House] In 1848 Ballinamona was held in fee by Thomas Carew when it was valued at £51. In 1814 Leet notes it as the residence of Robert Carew. Lewis refers to it as the seat of T. Carew in 1837. Smith, writing in 1774, describes it as a "well-built house" while Wilson, writing twenty years later refers to it as " a beautiful seat with large demesnes". Brady notes that it was rebuilt following a fire in the late nineteenth century. By 1906 it was owned by Robert Thomas Carew (jun) and valued at £70. It is still extant.
Ballinamore This house was the home of the Ormsby family in the 18th and 19th centuries. It was held in fee by Anthony Ormsby at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £40. In 1786 Wilson refers to it as " the beautiful seat of Thomas Ormsby". In 1938 the Ormsbys sold Ballinamore to a Scottish order of nuns, the Order of St John, who used the house as a school. The building was donated to Western Care in the 1970s. It now functions as a nursing home.
Ballinamore House or Curraghboy Lodge The residence of Martin ffrench held by him in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation and valued at £35. The house is noted on the 1st edition OS map as Curraghboy Lodge. In 1906 the owner was Michael Neary.
Ballinanchor House Ballinanchor was owned by Thomas Foley in 1851 when it was vacant and valued at £12. In 1814, Leet refers to it as the residence of Captain Thomas Poole. A house and farm still exist at the site.
Ballinard This house was the seat of the Chadwick family in the 18th and 19th centuries. The present house dates from the early 19th century and incorporates parts of an older building. John Chadwick was resident in 1814 and William Chadwick in 1837. In 1840 the Ordnance Survey Name Books note it as the seat of Ostin [Austin] Sadlier and describe the house as "a very large building in good repair". At the time of Griffith's Valuation. the house was valued at £33 and held from the Earl of Portarlington. The Chadwicks were still living at Ballinard at the beginning of the 20th century.
Ballinard Castle In 1894 Slater refers to Ballinard Castle as the residence of William Tennant. At the time of Griffith's Valuation, John Lindsay owned land in the townland of Friarsgrange, parish of Coolmundry, in which Ballinard Castle is situated. It appears that, in the nineteenth century, a house was built adjoining the original tower house as, in 1840, the Ordnance Survey Name Books refer to Ballinard Castle, a gentleman's seat in the townland of Friarsgrange. Information in the Woodstock Museum, Ontario, Canada, indicates that the building was owned by the Lindsay family until 1926. The building is still extant.
Ballinatona Cottage Daniel Welply was leasing this property to William Warren at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £13 5s. There is still an extant house at the site.
Ballinattin In 1786 Wilson refers to "Ballattin" as the seat of Mr. Parsons. This house valued at £17+ in the mid 19th century was occupied by Thomas Cooney and held from William Moore. A farm exists at the site and the original house is not extant.
Ballinattin House Occupied by Denis Cooney at the time of Griffith's Valuation, valued at £13+ and held from Edward B. Vise. This house is still extant and occupied.
Ballinavella Byrne In 1848 Charles Byrne was leasing this property from John B. Burroughs, when it was valued at over £13.
Ballincolla House At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Mary Warren was leasing a house at Ballincolla from John Limerick's estate, valued at £14. There is still an extant house at the site.
Ballincollig In 1786, Wilson mentions a seat of Mr.Lloyd at Ballincollig, "near the ruins of the castle". By the time of Griffith's Valuation, this area appears to have been in the possession of Thomas Tobin and the house may have been that leased by Rev. David Horgan, when the buildings were valued at £14. A substantial farm still exists at this site.
Ballincolloo This house was the residence of Mrs Bennet in 1814 and by 1837 of J. Gubbins. Joseph L. Gubbins occupied the house at the time of Griffith's Valuation holding it from the representatives of Samuel Bennett. It was valued at £14. It is no longer extant.
Ballincurrig W.C. Logan occupied Ballincurrig Cottage in 1837 and William Coppinger occupied a house at Ballincurrig valued at £33 and held by him in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation.
Ballincurrig Mrs. Susan Woodbourne was leasing this property from "the Ladies Boyle" at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £13. There is still a house at this site.
Ballindeasig Substanial buildings are marked at the site of Ballindeasig House on the first Ordnance Survey map and at the time of Griffith's Valuation the house valued at £18 was occupied and held by Richard Kenefick in fee. Ballindeasig was conveyed to John C. Hennessy by Richard Kenefick in 1853. It was the home of Michael Hennessy in the late 19th century and was left by Miss Minnie Hennessy to Bishop Cohalan of Cork in 1937. The house was then converted into a holiday home for the Sisters of Mercy Order. Now known as Tabor Lodge it is a centre for the treatment of substance abuse. see www.taborlodge.ie/
Ballindeenisk House Mrs. Charlotte Harrison held this property in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £8. It is one of two houses labelled Ballindeenisk House on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map and it also appears under this name on the later 25-inch edition of the 1890s. It is no longer extant.
Ballinderrig Ballinderrig is marked on the first edition Ordnance Survey map and was occupied in the mid 19th century by Jane Cantillon. She held the property valued at £13+ from Eliza Bury. Catherine Cantillon was also resident in the townland at Courtstown Cottage Grid Ref W774 720. By the publication of the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map in the 1890s the latter property has become known as Courtstown House. It is still extant.
Ballinderry Occupied by the Saunders family from at least the 1770s. Owen Saunders was resident in 1814. He was related to the Sadleirs of Ballinderry. Lewis records Thomas Sadlier junior as the proprietor of Ballinderry "on which a house was about to be erected". Thomas Sadlier held the property in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation when the buildings were valued at £29. At the time of the Saunders sale in 1877 this house was described as modern and substanial and "approached by a noble avenue lined with beech trees". It was in the owner's possession. Occupied by William J. Russell in 1906. This house is still a residence.
Ballinderry In 1840 the Ordnance Survey Name Books refer to Ballinderry House as "a good house in a demesne with some trees". James Demspter was noted as the proprietor at the time. By the time of Griffith's Valuation it appears to be the mill manager's house, occupied by William Egan and held from Timothy Hogan, part of a building complex valued at £97, known as Santa Cruise Mills. Now in use as a private residence.
Ballinderry At the time of Griffith's Valuation, this house was occupied by John P. Nolan when it was valued at £20. In 1894 it was recorded in Slater's directory as the seat of John Phillip Nolan who was M.P. for North Galway, 1870-1895, 1900-1906. The house was burnt in the early 1920s and nothing remains except the farm buildings, which are accessed through a stone archway dated 1843.
Ballinderry (Comyn) Lewis records Ballinderry as the seat of J. Comyn in 1837. At the time of Griffith's Valuation it was being leased by Andrew Comyn from the Ecclesiastical Commissioners and was valued at £16. Recorded as the residence of Col.John Comyn in 1894. In 1906 it was the property of Andrew N. Comyn. Ballinderry House is still extant and is now operated as a luxury country house hotel. See www.ballinderrypark.com.
Ballindinis Ballindinis was associated with the Garde family in the 18th century. The house is marked on the first Ordnance Survey map and was occupied by the Reverend Maurice Hewson in the mid 19th century, when held from Sophia Bellew and valued at £16. A house is still extant at the site.
Ballindoon House Ballindoon or Kingsborough House in the townland of Kingsborough was built c.1820. An earlier house, known as Kingsborough, stood on the site.At the time of Griffith's Valuation, John Gethin was in possession of the house at Kingsborough which was valued at £20. In 1906 Percy Gethin owned the property then valued at £22. The house is still extant. In 2018 it was offered for sale.
Ballindresrough Mills William R. Meade was leasing this property to Daniel Keller at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £25, including a flour mills. It is not marked on the later 25-inch map, suggesting it was no longer operational in the 1890s. Extensive farm buildings occupy the site now.
Ballinduff Lodge A Skerrett home in the 18th and 19th centuries. It is labelled Ballinduff Lodge on the Ordnance Survey maps though the 25-inch edition of the 1890s notes that it was in ruins by then. At the time of Griffith's Valuation John Skerrett held the lands in fee when the house was only valued at £2. The old castle stands close by the house ruins.
Ballingarrane Ballingarrane was originally leased and then purchased in the late 18th century by Solomon Watson, banker of Clonmel. He built Summerville House which later became known as Ballingarrane. W. H. Bradshaw occupied the house in 1837 and John Mulcahy in the mid 19th century when the buildings were valued at £25+ and held from Solomon Watson. The Watsons occupied the house again in the second half of the 19th century and family members were still resident in the late 20th century.
Ballingarry Situated just north of Ballingarry castle Ballingarry House was built circa 1820. Lewis records Marmaduke Thompson as resident at Ballingarry Castle in 1837 as does the Ordnance Survey Name Books in 1841 though they refer to Lord Ashtown as the proprietor. The Thompson interest in Ballingarry and Ballinahinch was for sale in June 1850. Henry Trench was the occupier in the early 1850s holding the property form Lord Ashtown. Ballingarry House is still extant and occupied.
Ballinglanna Occupied by J. Newsom in 1814 and E. Newsom in 1837. Edward Newsom held this house from Eliza McCaul and Louis Denay at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £24. This house is named Glenville on the first Ordnance Survey map.
Ballinglen Cottage Leased from the Knoxes of Castlereagh, barony of Tirawley. At the time of Griffith's Valuation John Fawcett occupied property in this townland including a house valued at £12 and a mill. Occupied by Susan Pringle in 1906. Ballinglen Cottage is now in ruins.
Ballingowan House (South) Robert Dower was leasing this property from William Villiers-Stuart at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £13 5s. A house still exists at this site.
Ballinkina At the time of Griffith's Valuation, William Connolly, MD, was leasing this property from Lord Waterford's estate, when it was valued at over £15. Buildings are still extant at the site.
Ballinlass William Kelly was residing at Ballinglass, parish of Killeroran, in 1749. Occupied by Nicholas D'Arcy from the 1830s to the early 1850s and by Malachy Fallon in the mid 1850s. Its final occupant was Fred Grainger and the farm is now in the ownership of the Moore family. The ruin of Ballinlass House was demoished in 2002.
Ballinlonty Lewis records M. Fogarty as resident in 1837. In 1840 it is described by the Ordnance Survey Name Books as "a genleman's house" though the resident's name is not recorded. The house, valued at £9.10 shilling was held by Frederick J. Fegan in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation. This house is no longer occupied.