Landed Estates
NUI Galway

Browse Houses

Search Results: Returned 4893 records. Displaying results 501 – 600

House name Description
Ballylin Michael Smith was living at Ballylin, Rathkeale, in 1814 and R. Smith in 1837.
Ballyline Weir writes that this house was also known as Millbrook. It was occupied by Henry Butler in 1814 but had reverted back to another branch of the family by 1837 when Austin Butler was the proprietor. Austin Butler held the house in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £15. The representatives of Theobald Butler held the house and 428 acres of untenanted land in 1906. The house was demolished by the Land Commission before the 1940s and the land divided.
Ballyline St. John Blacker was leasing this property to Nicholas King at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £3 10s, on a holding of over 250 acres. Modern farm buildings exist at the site now. [Grid Reference is approximate].
Ballymacadam House Robert M. Leeson was leasing this property to John Roche at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £13. In the 1830s, the Ordnance Survey Field Name Books record Lady Franks as the owner of the townland and John Roche occupying the house. In 1786 Wilson refers to Ballymacadam as a seat of the Earl of Glandore. Bary states that the house had a number of owners since its construction in the eighteenth century. It is still extant and occupied.
Ballymacgibbon House The home of the Fynn family in the 18th and 19th centuries. It was held in fee by Jane Finn at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £20. It is now an ivy covered ruin.
Ballymackeogh The seat of the Ryan family for much of the 18th and 19th centuries, occupied by William Ryan in 1814 and by his son William Ryan in 1837. The Ordnance Survey Name Books refer to the house as the residence of Mr. Hawkshaw in 1840. William Ryan held the property in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation when the buildings were valued at £31. The Ryans were still resident at the beginning of the 20th century. This house is still extant.
Ballymackey House Ballymackey House is described as "in ruins" at the time of the first Ordnance Survey in the 1830s. An earlier tower house is also shown, described as "Ballymackey Castle (in ruins)". Wilson, writing in 1786, refers to "Ballymakey" as the seat of Mr. O'Meara. The Ordnance Survey Name Books describe Ballymackey House as "an old house adjoining the south side of Ballymackey old castle.....now in a state of total ruin". By the time of Griffith's Valuation, this townland was part of the Cole-Bowan estate. Most of the site is now occupied by extensive farm sheds though ruins of the old castle are still visible.
Ballymacmoy The Hennessys were settled at Ballymacmoy from the mid 18th century. In 1786 Wilson refers to "Ballymacboy" as the seat of Mr. Hennessy. A new house was built circa 1820s. By the time of Griffith's Valuation the Hennessy home was valued at £13.5 shillings and was held in fee by James Hennessy. He also owned a flour mill valued at £70 which he leased to Henry B. Foote. This house was still a Hennessy home in the 20th century and the house is still extant.
Ballymacooda A house valued at £15 at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was in the possession of Michael Finucane who held it from Nicholas Westby. Passed into the ownership of the Commane family in the 20th century. [Grid reference is approximate]
Ballymacreese A residence of the Greene family in the 18th century and noted by Wilson as the seat of Mr. Greene in 1786. The Ordnance Survey Name Books refer to this house as the seat of Mr James Shine, rebuilt in 1829 at a cost of £900. Occupied by James Shine in the early 1850s and held from the representatives of Frederick Lloyd. The buildings were valued at £26. Jeremiah Shine of Ballymacreese owned 79 acres in the county in the 1870s. The house is still extant and well-maintained.
Ballymacsimon A house located on the Devonshire estate and occupied by John Kirby in the mid 19th century. The buildings were valued at £25. William Kirby held 2 townlands in the parish of Aghera at the time of Griffith's Valuation. Home of the Collins family in the mid 20th century and still inhabited.
Ballymacurly Andrew McDermott was farming at Ballymackeriley, parish of Cloonygormican in 1749. Occupied by Michael Nolan in 1837 and in the 1850s and held from Hugh O'Byrne.
Ballymagooly The home of the Franks family in the mid 18th century. John Nash was living here in the late 18th century. In 1790 his daughter Catherine married Robert Courtenay of Ballyedmond and the property passed to the Courtneys. Ballymagooly was occupied by the Courtneys in 1814 and in 1837. Held by John Courtney in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation when the buildings were valued at £35. Also known as The Garrison the house was burnt and the stableblock converted into a residence in 1955.
Ballymakee House Edward Mulcahy was leasing this property from the Stradbroke estate at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £26. A substantial house overlooking the river Suir, it is still extant.
Ballymalis Christopher Gallway was leasing a property from John Sealy, which included a mill, at Ballymalis at the time of Griffith’s valuation. It was then valued at £34. It is labelled "paper mill" on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map and as "woollen mill" on the 25-inch edition of the 1890s. An extensive range of buildings still exists at the site. Elsewhere in this townland is Ballymalis Castle, a tower house in existence since the sixteenth century and latterly, associated with the Eager family.
Ballymaloe William Abbot was resident at Ballymaloe in 1814. It was described by Lewis in 1837 as a "very curious old house, built by the Fitzgeralds and forfeited in the war of 1641, it is now the property of Mr Forster" . By the early 1850s John Litchfield [Lichfield] was resident holding the house valued at £48 from Mountifort Longfield. It was the seat of William Lichfield in 1894. It is now the home of the Allen family who run it as a guest house with adjacent shop. Their renowned cookery school is nearby. see http://www.ballymaloe.ie/
Ballymana House In 1851, James Bryan was leasing this property valued almost £9 from Samuel Townsend. It is labelled Ballymana House on the 25-inch map of the 1890s. It is still extant and occupied.
Ballymanagh (Dunkellin) In 1786 Wilson writes that Ballymanagh was the seat of Mr. Burke. Ballymanagh House is shown on both the 1st and 25-inch edition Ordnance Survey maps. At the time of Griffith's Valuation it was leased by James Burke from the Redington estate when the house was valued at almost £2. A house is still extant at the site.
Ballymantan/Ballynamantan At the time of Griffith's Valuation Ballynamantan was leased by Edward J. Hunt to Francis J. Davys. It was then valued at £15. Lewis records the house as the seat of Lombard Hunt. An occupied house still exists at the site though it is not the original.
Ballymartin House Francis Campion, MD, was leasing this property from the Cavendish estate in 1851 when it was valued at £16. It is present but not named on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey Map but is named Ballymartin House on the later 25-inch map. Brady indicates that the present house is of early nineteenth century date. It is still extant and occupied.
Ballymartinbeg At the time of Griffith's Valuation Jane Plunket held the house, offices and cornmill valued at £16 from the representatives of Gunning Plunket. Occupied by Martin McDonnell in 1906 and valued at £11. A house at the site has been recently renovated.
Ballymartle William R. Meade held Ballymartle in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £35. It was also noted by Lewis as the seat of W.R. Meade in 1837. In the 1770s it was the property of Rev. W, Meade. In the 1940s the Irish Tourist Association Survey described it as "an imposing residence in a finely wooded estate, occupied by Major Meade". It is now a roofless ruin.
Ballymona Ralph Smith was resident at Ballymona in 1837 and in the early 1850s. The Ordnance Survey Name Books refer to the house as " a plain modern building" in 1841. Smyth held the property from Lord Ashtown and the buildings were valued at £25. This house is now a ruin.
Ballymoney Glebe House At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Reverend Robert Meade was leasing this property from the Trinity College estates when it was valued at £23. A slightly different building is labelled "Rectory" on the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s. It is still extent and in use.
Ballymore Wilson mentions the seat of Mr. Rathbourne near Craughwell in 1786 though he does not name the house. In 1837 Lewis recorded Ballymore as the seat of R. Rathbourne, who continued to reside there until the 1880s. Griffith's Valuation shows that Richard Rathbourne held it from the Clanricarde estate. This may be the house noted by Slater as part of Lord Clanmorris's estate in 1894. Ballymore is still extant and occupied together with an extensive range of outbuildings.
Ballymore Alex Popham was leasing a house valued at £17 to Andrew Irwin at the time of Griffith's Valuation. Writing in 1786 Wilson refers to Ballymore as the seat of Pooley Shuldham, who may have been connected with the Longford family of that name. In 1814 Ballymore was the seat of Edward Elwood. In 1837 Lewis recorded it as the seat of Rev. J. Elwood. It is described as " a mansion in the possession of the late Rev. Elwood's family" at the time of the first Ordnance Survey. A house is still extant at Ballymore.
Ballymore Castle At the time of Griffith's Valuation Ballymore Castle was occupied by Thomas Seymour. This house continued to be the seat of the Seymour family until at least 1906 and was noted by Slater as the seat of Walter G. Seymour in 1894. It is still extant and occupied.
Ballymore House The Hare family, Earls of Listowel, also held land in the townland of Ballymore in the 19th century. In 1814 the proprietor of Ballymore was the Honourable Mr Hare. In 1837 J.H. Bennett was resident at Ballymore House. This house appears to have been in the possession of the Honourable Robert Hare at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was held from Joseph H. Bennett and valued at £15+. Robert Hare was a younger brother of the 2nd Earl of Listowel and married in 1840 Louisa French of Marino. Their son Robert Dillon lived at Ballymore. In 1906 John C. Bennett is given as the occupier and the mansion house was valued at £65. Bence Jones writes that post 1950 owners include the O'Donovans and Hecketts.
Ballymore House The Murphys were established at Ballymore from the early 18th century. A castle and two houses are located in this townland at the time of Griffith's Valuation, all inhabited by members of the Murphy family. The main residence was Ballymore House, which was occupied by Edmond W. Murphy. He held the house and 423 acres from the Earl of Norbury. The buildings were valued at £24.5 shillings. Daniel Murphy also occupied a house valued at £12.5 shillings (Grid Ref S021 457). Ballymore House is still a family residence.
Ballymorris In 1786 Wilson refers to Ballymorris as the seat of Mr. Magher. By the time of Griffith's Valuation the townland was held by Stephen O'Meagher and the buildings were valued at £1. The house appears to be gone by the time the first Ordnance Survey map was published as it is not shown there.
Ballymountain House John Wheeler was leasing this property from the Earl of Bandon's estate at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £15. There is still an extant house at Ballymountain, on a large farm and run as a guesthouse.
Ballymurphy Occupied by Eyre Powell in 1837 and by the Reverend George Peacock in the early 1850s and held from Edward C. Villiers.
Ballymurray House The Crofton family are originally recorded as 'of Ballymurray'. Ballymurray is the next townland east of Mote Demesne. A house at Ballymurray was occupied by Captain E. W. Kelly in 1837 and by Edmund Kelly in the 1850s, who held the house, valued at £9, from the representatives of James Daly. William Curtis was residing in Ballymurray in the 1870s. The property is labelled "Balymurray House" on the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s. It is no longer extant.
Ballymurreen In 1786 Wilson refers to "Ballymoreen, with the ruins of castle and church" as the seat of Mr. Baker. This townland was described as "in chancery" at the time of Griffith's Valuation.
Ballymurtagh A house on the Miller estate, leased to John Kelly in the mid 19th century, when it was valued at £12. Weir writes that it was demolished due to its proximity to Shannon Airport runway.
Ballynabanoge Michael Power was leasing this property to Michael Lenehan at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £9. In 1906 it was the property of Patrick J. Power and valued at £8 10s. Modern buildings are present at the site.
Ballynabearna Occupied by William J. Upton in 1814 and by W. Upton in 1837. This house was valued at £2 in the early 1850s and held by John Upton from Sir Robert Bateson. the building labelled Ballynabearna House on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map is not the same as the house on the later 25-inch map of the 1890s. Buildings are still extant at the site.
Ballynabloun House In the 1850s this townland was held by Charles O'Connell, son-in-law of Daniel O'Connell. Local sources suggest he built this house around 1840. The house here was valued at £7 10s at the time of Griffith's Valuation. It was sold in the 1900s by Charles O'Connell's son, Daniel and thereafter demolished. The site of the walled garden is still visible.
Ballynacarriga The Ordnance Survey Name Books describe this house as "falling into decay", the property of Mr Enright. By 1837 a Mr Dawson was the proprietor of Ballynacarriga House and in the early 1850s it was occupied by Dawson L. Westropp. In 1906 Ballynacarriga valued at £20.10 shillings was occupied by Norris Richard Russell. It is no longer extant.
Ballynacarriga Built in 1819 this house was occupied by a member of the Hill family at the time of the Ordnance Survey who was renting the property from Mrs Hurst . Lewis records H. Hurst as resident in 1837 and in the early 1850s Captain Richard Gloster held this house valued at £21 in fee. This house is now known as Rockfield.
Ballynacarriga A mid 18th century house, home of the Pyne family for over a century until they sold it in the Encumbered Estates' Court in 1852. Before the sale John G. Pyne was resident, holding the property in perpetuity. The buildings were valued at £18.10 shillings. Bought by Laurence Corban it passed from the Pynes to the Corban Lucas family, members of whom were still resident at the beginning of the 21st century.
Ballynaclashy House Occupied by Henry Wilson in the early 1850s, held from James H. Smith Barry and valued at £10.10 shillings. Herny Wilson of Ballynaclashy owned 83 acres in the 1870s. A house is still extant at the site.
Ballynaclogh House The home of Richard Uniacke Bayly and his family in the 19th century, held from his brother John. The house was valued at almost £17 at the time of Griffith's Valuation. This house is still extant and occupied.
Ballynacorra An 18th century house, occupied by John Garde in 1814 and by Thomas Garde at the time of Griffith's Valuation, who held the building valued at £40 from the Earl of Shannon. Still in use as a residence.
Ballynacourty In 1837 and at the time of Griffith's Valuation occupied by Michael Burke. In the 1850s it was valued at £13 and held from the Honourable C.B. Wandesforde.
Ballynacourty Originally the home of the Dawson family, it passed by marriage to the Massy family and was the seat of the Massy Dawsons in the 18th and 19th centuries. Occupied by J. H. Massy Dawson in 1837 and owned by the estate of Reverend John M. Dawson in the early 1850s. It was held in fee and was valued at £75. In 1839 the Ordnance Survey Name Books describe it as "beautifully situated and in good repair, the residence of Rev. J.M. Dawson". In 1894 Slater refers to it as the seat of George Staunton King Massy-Dawson. This house was a ruin by the mid 20th century.
Ballynacourty A house occupied by Thomas Davenport from at least 1837. The Ordnance Survey Field Name Books circa 1840 state that the house was built by John Evans "about 90 years" previously. It was two storeys high. The house was valued at £15 in the early 1850s and was held from Daniel D. Power. The house is still extant and now owned by John Feheney. For more information see www.iverusresearchfoundation.com (See ‘Research Notes’, Ballinacourty House).
Ballynacourty House This house, located on the Massy estate, was the residence of Colonel John Vandeleur in the early 1850s when it was valued at £17+. A house is still extant at the site.
Ballynacourty House Thomas Wyse was leasing this property to Robert Longan at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £20. It was also noted as Longan's residence by Lewis in 1837 and Leet in 1814. The house was derelict by the end of the twentieth century.
Ballynacree House A house valued at £10 and held from Samuel Dixon by Michael Manning in the mid 19th century. Ballynacree is still extant.
Ballynagar/Ballinagar Lewis records Ballynagar as the seat of A. Nugent in 1837. . At the time of Griffith's Valuation it was the property of John Aylward and was valued at £10 but the estate is recorded as in Chancery. In 1894 it was the seat of John Lewis and the Lewis family continued to reside at Ballynagar until the 1920s. Ballynagar is still extand and occupied.
Ballynagarde The seat of the Croker family from early in the 18th century. Bence Jones writes that the house was built in 1774 and that it became a ruin during the 20th century. It was valued at £70 in the mid 19th century and held in fee by John Croker. The seat of H.S. Croker in 1894. By 1906 this house was valued at £119+ and was occupied by Courtenay Croker. The Irish Tourist Association Survey records the occupation of this house by the Defence Forces in 1942. It is now a ruin.
Ballynagare House John Morrogh Bernard was leasing this property to George Gilbert (Senior) at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £6. In 1837, Lewis described it as the seat of the representatives of the late John Barnard. Leet had noted it as the seat of the latter in 1814. Bary indicates that the original house at this site has been demolished.
Ballynagornagh House In 1786 Wilson refers to "O'Barley-Hill" as a seat of Mr. Morris. At the time of the publication of the 1st Ordnance Survey the original Ballynagornagh House is described as "in ruins". However, a house has been restored on the site by the 1890s when it appears on the 25-inch Map. At the time of Griffith's Valuation, the townland was still in the possession of the Morris family though much of it was leased to the Donovans. The house was valued at £4 5s. A substantial farm occupies the site now.
Ballynagrana Taylor and Skinner's map indicates that this is the location of the house originally known as Wilmar, which was occupied by Nicholson Esq in the 1770s. Wilmar Mill is marked closeby in the townland of Ballyrichard on the first edition Ordnance Survey map. The Ordnance Survey Letters refer to the property as Wilmer House in 1840. Lorenzo Hickie Jephson lived at Wilmar for some time in the early 19th century. Francis Mandeville was resident in 1814. Denis Kennedy occupied a house in Ballynagrana, held from Denis Hayden and valued at £13.14 shillings at the time of Griffith's Valuation. Ellen Hayden of Ballynagrana owned 255 acres in county Tipperary in the 1870s. This house is no longer extant.
Ballynahaha The residence of Mathew Scanlan circa 1840. Located on the Scanlan estate in the mid 19th century, occupied by David Bennett and valued at £11.
Ballynahina Ballynahina was a Barry home inhabited by Philip Barry and his wife Mary Ann at the end of the 18th century. Lewis refers to Gerard Barry at Ballinahina House and Reverend Dr Barry, Parish Priest of Fermoy for half a century, at Ballinahina Cottage. Edward Barry was resident at Ballynahina, valued at £11, in the early 1850s. He held the property from Gerald Barry. This house is still extant.
Ballynahinch A house valued at £11 occupied by Thomas Cleary at the time of Griffith's Valuation and held with 354 acres from the Trench/Gascoigne estate. Thomas Cleary of Ballinahinch owned 454 acres in county Limerick in the 1870s. A house is still extant at the site.
Ballynahinch A house valued at £14, occupied by Denis Heany and held from Richard B. H. Lowe at the time of Griffith's Valuation. This house is still extant and the centre of a working farm.
Ballynahinch Castle Built in the 18th century for the Martin family, bought by the Law Life Assurance Society in 1852. It was in their possession at the time of Griffith's Valuation and valued at £35. Ballynahinch was sold to the Berridge family in 1872. In 1926 it was bought from the Berridges by the Indian prince and cricketeer Ranjitsinhji and continued in his ownership until his death in 1933. The castle has been used as a hotel since 1946. http://www.ballynahinch-castle.com/
Ballynahivnia Lord Dunsandle is recorded as the lessor of 161 acres and a complex of buildings, including a mill, valued at £18, in the townland of Ballynahivnia, in 1855. The substantial remains of a tower house, together with the foundations of the mill building remain at the site, close to Riverville Bridge.
Ballynakill A house valued at £8 at the time of Griffith's Valuation and occupied by Godfrey Massy who held the property from Laurence H. Jephson. Lewis also records Godfrey Massy as resident in 1837. A lithograph of this house is included in the Jephson sale rental of 1851.
Ballynakill A house on the Pigott estate, burnt by the insurgents on 24 February 1822 according to Fitzgerald as it had been converted into a soldiers' barrack. It was occupied by Richard Pierce Power in the early 1850s and valued at £14.
Ballynakill A At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Martin Rockett was leasing this property from the Power estate when it was valued at £15 10s.
Ballynakill House (Gaultiere) Leased by Robinson Thomas from the Power estate in 1848, when it was valued at £42. In 1837 Lewis noted it as belonging to the Power family but "now occupied by a tenant". Leet records it as the residence of P. Power in 1814. Writing in 1774, Smith describes Ballynakill as "the agreeable seat of William Dobbyn". Brady notes that it incorporates the fabric of a medieval tower house. Ballynakill House is still extant and occupied.
Ballynakilly Lady Anne Headley was leasing this property, valued at £6 5s,to Andrew Talbot at the time of Griffith's Valuation. Farm buildings still exist at the site.
Ballynalacka Lodge In the sale rental of 1852 there is reference to the erection of a shooting lodge at Ballynalacka by the 'late proprietor' and a building named Ballynalacka Lodge appears in this townland on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey Map. It is labelled as "in ruins" on the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s.
Ballynalackan Lewis writes in the late 1830s that Ballynalacken Castle was about to be repaired by the proprietor J. O'Brien. Weir writes that John O'Brien built a house near the old castle in 1840 and the O'Brien family lived there in the second half of the 19th century, however there is no house in the townland of Ballylacken valued at more than £2 at the time of Griffith's Valuation and no indication that the O'Briens were resident. The house was bought by the O'Callaghan family in 1939 and is run by them as a small hotel. see http://www.ballinalackencastle.com/index.html
Ballynalacken A house valued at £15 and occupied by George Gubbins who held it from Francis Coppinger at the time of Griffith's Valuation. It is no longer extant.
Ballynamanagh At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Thomas Redington was leasing a house valued at £4 at Ballynamanagh, barony of Dunkellin, to John Caven. It was accompanied by almost 100 acres. Kelly noted that it had been the property of Mr.Burke of Carheen for over 100 years but was later in the possession of the Redington estate. This house is still extant and occupied.
Ballynametagh At the time of Griffith's Valuation, John Kingston was leasing this house to Daniel Coates, when it was valued at £9. A modern house and farm occupy this site now.
Ballynamona The Nagles originally inhabited the castle at Ballynamona but later built a house adjoining the castle. Garret Nagle was resident in 1814 and Lewis refers to Ballynamona as the ancient family residence "about to be rebuilt". Garret Nagle occupied a house at Ballynamona valued at £9.15 shillings at the time of Griffith's Valuation which he held from John Furlong. The house is still occupied.
Ballynamona A small property known as Quarryfield Cottage occupied this site at the time of the First Ordnance Survey. The property here was the home of George Vandeleur in the 1870s. On the later 25-inch map of the 1890s a much larger property, labelled Ballynamona House, is shown. A house is still extant at the site.
Ballynamona House John M. Travers was leasing this property together with over 135 acres to Thomas Beech in or at the time of Griffith's Valuation. A house is still extant at the site.
Ballynamuck House At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Mrs. Eleanor Hearne was leasing this property to Patrick McCarthy when it was valued at £10 10s. In 1814 Leet notes it as the residence of Miss McGrath. Farm buildings now occupy the site.
Ballynamultina House Francis Kennedy was leasing this property from the Mansfield estate at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £18 10s. Leet also refers to it as his residence in 1814. Smith states it was the seat of Mr. Mansfield in the late eighteenth century. A house is still extant at the site.
Ballynanty Ballynauty was the residence of Mrs Creed in 1837 and of Charles W. Smith in the early 1850s. He held the property from the Trustess of Charles Smith and the buildings were valued at £37 Still recorded by Slater as a Smith property in 1894. . The original house is not extant.
Ballynaparka House In 1851, this house was held in fee by Thomas J. Fitzgerald and valued at over £31. Leet had recorded it as the seat of Patrick Dwyer in 1814. In 1906 it was still the property of the Fitzgerald estate and valued at over £10. There is still a house at this location.
Ballynaroon Griffith's Valuation records a house valued at £13.15 shillings in this townland in the mid 19th century. It was occupied by Charles W. Welland and held from the representatives of Viscount Midleton. The house is named The Highlands on the 25 inch to the mile map. Only yard buildings now remain at this site.
Ballynashee Lodge [Geevagh Lodge] At the time of Griffith's Valuation Michael Keogh owned Ballynashee Lodge, valued at £22. In 1906 George Keogh was the owner of the mansion house at Ballynashee valued at £22. Lewis also records this house as a seat of the Keogh family in 1837. It is labelled Ballynashee Lodge on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map but as Geevagh Lodge on the later 25-inch edition of the 1890s. A later building is still extant at the site.
Ballynatray House Held in fee by Richard Smyth at the time of Griffith's Valuation when the buildings, including a mill, were valued at over £100. Lewis also refers to it as the seat of R. Smyth in 1837 when he describes it as "finely situated in a much improved demesne". In 1814 it was the residence of Grice Smyth who Brady cites as the builder. Charles Smith notes an earlier residence as the seat of Richard Smith. In 1943 the ITA survey referred to is as the seat of Captain Holroyd Smyth. Ballynatray is still extant and the focus of an 850-acres estate, with notable gardens. See www.ballynatray.com for details.
Ballynavin According to the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage the origins of this building date back to the mid 17th century. Ballynavin was a Robinson home in the 19th century, occupied by Mrs Robinson in 1837 and by Reverend Robert Robinson in the early 1850s. He held the property in fee and the buildings were valued at £18. Robert Robinson lived at Ballynavin in the 1870s. The house is still in use as a residence.
Ballyneal House Ballyneal was held from the Waterford estate by William Shanahan (David) at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £14 10s. A second house in the townland, leased by William Shanahan (John) was valued at £12 10s [S373150] There is still a house extant at this site.
Ballyneale Bence Jones writes of this house having an early 19th century appearance. Occupied by John Cox and held from the Honourable John Massy in the early 1850s. The buildings were valued at £13+. At the end of the 20th century this house was the home of Lewis Glucksman. Sold by the Glucksmans in 1998. In 2008 it was placed on the market again by its current owner David Pearl for 10,000,000 euro. see http://www.michaelhdaniels.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=propdetails&Prop_RefId=39
Ballyneill Patrick O'Donnell held buildings valued at £13 from Rodolphus Scully at Ballyneill in the mid 19th century. This may be the present house however it looks as if it might date from later in the 19th century. It is situated close to the remains of Ballyneill Castle.
Ballynera The residence of Richard Pennefather in 1837 and at the time of Griffith's Valuation when the house was valued at £10 and held in fee. A house is still extant at the site.
Ballynevin James Moore was leasing two properties from Lord Waterford at Ballynevin at the time of Griffith's Valuation. One was valued at £22 and the second [S399178] at £10 10s. Substantial farms still exist at both sites.
Ballynew House In the 18th century Ballynew was the home of a branch of the Miller family of Milford, near Kilmaine, county Mayo. In 1777 Robert Miller of Ballynew married a Bridget Young of Harristown, county Roscommon. Ballynew became a Bourke home in the 19th century through a Miller/Bourke marriage. Ballynew is still extant and occupied.
Ballynilard Cottage In 1840 the Ordnance Survey Name Books refer to Ballynilard Cottage as the residence of Robert Smithwick, "pleasantly situated and in good repair". At the time of Griffith's Valuation, the townland was part of the Smith-Barry estate. Robert Smithwick was leasing a house valued almost £10 while William Evans, MD, was leasing another house in the townland valued at £10 5s. Ballynilard Cottage is labelled Cottage on the later 25-inch map of the 1890s and a house still exists at that location.
Ballynoe An 18th century house built by the Cox family. This house valued at £39 was the home of William Cox in the 1850s and 1870s. At the time of Griffith's Valuation it was held from the Court of Chancery. Bence Jones records this house as now derelict. Described as the Irish Tourist Association surveyor in 1944 as a "grand" Georgian house but in a very bad state of repair.
Ballynoe House William Stoughton was leasing this property to Catherine Pierce at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £21 15s. In 1837 Lewis refers to it as the seat of D. Pierce. Leets mentions it as the residence of Daniel Pearce in 1814. In 1906 it was owned by the representatives of Charles William Stoughton and was valued at £19. Bary writes that the Pierce or Pierse family were agents for the Stoughtons. The house is still extant and occupied.
Ballynoe House Ballynoe House is marked on the first edition Ordnance Survey map and was occupied by William Cahill at the time of Griffith's Valuation when the buildings were valued at £14.5.0. and held from James Barry. Later owned by the Murphy family. This house is still extant and occupied. For sale in 2017.
Ballynoe/The Hermitage Ballynoe House, later known as The Hermitage to avoid confusion with the neighbouring house of the same name, was occupied by Abraham Hargrave in 1837 and at the time of Griffith's Valuation, held from James H.S. Barry and valued at £14.15 shillings. Abraham Hargrave owned 36 acres at Ballynoe in the 1870s. This single storey house, originally intended to be built as a stable block, is currently not in use.
Ballynolan This 3 storied house was the seat of the Reverend Thomas Westropp, rector of Ardcanny, built by him [his father?] in 1797. It was occupied by H. Potter esquire in 1837 and by Peter W. Morgan at the time of Griffith's Valuation who held it in fee with a demesne of 98 acres. Valued at £11.10 shillings in 1906 and occupied by Sarah E. M. Westropp. Still extant and occupied.
Ballynona House The main seat of the Wigmore family, occupied by Richard H. Wigmore in 1814 and R. Wigmore in 1837. Henry Wigmore held the property from Sir Arthur Brooke in the early 1850s when the house was valued at £15+.
Ballynora A house valued at £14 and held by Thomas Magner in the mid 19th century from the representatives of John McSweeny.
Ballynort A Taylor residence which passed by marriage to the Massy family. In1786 Wilson describes it as" the pleasant seat of Mr. Massey". The townland of Ballynort, 657 acres, was held in fee by Standish O'Grady and E.T. Massy at the time of Griffith's Valuation. This house is marked "in ruins" on the first Ordnance Survey map. The buildings were valued at £4+. There is no trace of the house on the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s.
Ballyoughter Occupied by John Goldsmith at the time of Griffith's Valuation. He held the house valued at £8 and 60 acres from Marcus McCausland. Another John Goldsmith was residing in Ballyoughter a hundred years earlier at the time of the Elphin Census. Wilson also refers to the house as the seat of Mr. Goldsmith in 1786. A later house, also named Ballyoughter House, is shown on the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s and there is still a house at this site,
Ballyphilibeen A building is marked on the first Ordnance Survey map in this townland. By the time of Griffith's Valuation Prudence Twinhan was living in a house valued at £14 and held from Thomas Wise with 225 acres.
Ballyphilip The seat of the Going family in the 18th and 19th centuries, W. and A. Going were resident in 1814 and Ambrose Going held the property in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation. The buildings were valued at £30.15 shillings. This house was held by the representatives of B.F. Going in 1906. Buildings are still extant at the site.