Landed Estates
NUI Galway

Browse Houses

Search Results: Returned 4893 records. Displaying results 801 – 900

House name Description
Birchfield Birchfield was the residence of Cornelius O'Brien in 1814 and in 1837. Lewis also refers to the erecting of an ornamental building in castellated style for the accommodation of visitors on the top of the cliffs [of Moher] by Cornelius O'Brien. The house was valued at £50 at the time of Griffith's Valuation. By the mid 1870s Birchfield belonged to Cornelius Alexander Keogh. It is now a ruin.
Birchgrove The home of the Birch family, occupied by George Birch in 1814. In 1837 Lewis writes that Birchgrove was the seat of J. Birch and that some additions were made to the house by the "late Mr Elsam". The 1835 map of Birchgrove includes a small pen and ink drawing of the house. Griffith's Valuation records George Birch as the occupier holding the house valued at £27+ and his distillery valued at £66 from the Earl of Portarlington. In 1910 Birch Grove was the home of Edward Robert Birch, eldest son of James Sayce Birch and his wife, Mary Warburton. This house on the outskirts of Roscrea is still a residence.
Birchhill Cottage/Birchhill House This house was occupied by John Travers at the time of Griffith's Valuation. He held it from Francis Wyse and it was valued at £10.10 shillings. Jane Clerke occupied a mansion house valued at £20 in this townland in 1906. It is labelled Birchhill Cottage on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map but as Birchhill House on the 25-edition of the 1890s. A house is still extant at the site.
Bird Hill A house located on the outskirts of Clonmel town was the residence of a member of the Taylor family in 1837. At the time of Griffith's Valuation this house valued at £10.12 shillings was occupied by Margaret Cantwell and held from Stephen Moore with 7 acres of land. This house is still in use as a residence.
Birdhill This house was originally the home of a branch of the Going family. Leet records Richard Going as the occupant in 1814. He was murdered in 1821. S. H. Atkins was resident in 1837. In 1840 the Ordnance Survvey Name Books note it as the seat of John Going and describe it as "a commodious dwelling house" with a demesne consisting of "plantation and ornamental ground". At the time of Griffith's Valuation, John Going was also the occupier when he held the house, valued at £40, with 51 acres and the national school, from Mrs Margaret Ormsby [nee Atkins]. She left Birdhill to her nephew George Twiss. Birdhill was burnt in the early 1920s and is now a ruin.
Birdhill (Kyle) Christopher Kayes held a house and offices valued at £27.18 shillings with 231 acres from Mrs Margaret Ormsby in the townland of Birdhill at the time of Griffith's Valuation. These would appear to be located south west of Birdhill House and just east of Kyle burial ground.
Bishop's Island Grice Richard Smyth held buildings valued at £25 in the townland of Bishop's Island at the time of Griffith's Valuation. ''Burke's Irish Family Records'' refers to his father Henry Mitchell Smyth of Bishop's Island. In 1786 Wilson notes Bishop's Island as the seat of Mr. Mitchell.
Bishopstown (Upperthird) At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Catherine Hally was leasing this property, valued at £11, from the Trustees of Waterford College. Modern buildings exist at the site now.
Blackfort William Molloy was resident in 1814 and W. Minnett in 1837. Blackfort was advertised for sale in May 1851 by the Reverend David Fitzgerald, Edward Galwey was the petitioner. By the time of Griffith's Valuation Edward Galwey held Blackfort, or Lisduff as it became known, in fee. The buildings were valued at £15.10 shillings. Edward Galwey of Lisduff, Nenagh, owned 245 acres in county Tipperary in the 1870s. Richard Galway occupied Blackfort in 1906 when the house was valued at £22+.
Blackhorsefield Rev. Francis Stawell was leasing this property to Eugene Sweeney at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £16. Changes seem to have taken place at the site by the time of the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s. A school occupies this location now.
Blackrock In 1906 the house at Blackrock was owned by John W.L. Birchall and was valued at £10. Arthur J.V.L.Burchall was occupying the house at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was also valued at £10. There is still an occupied house at this site.
Blackwater House Home of the McAdam family in the 19th century before they moved to live in Sussex. The house was valued at £16 in the mid 19th century and was the residence of Philip McAdam. In 1894 Slater refers to it as the residence of Mrs. Caswell. Also known as Springhill House, it is now demolished.
Blair's Cove At the time of Griffith's Valuation, this property was held in fee by Richard L. Blair and valued at £20. In 1837 Lewis had noted it as the seat of R.L. Blair. Leet refers to it as the seat of Cornelius O' Connor in 1814. It was offered for sale, as part of the Blair estate sale, in April 1866 when it was noted that "with judicious outlay in repairs it might be rendered very comfortable". The house is still extant and now houses a restaurant and luxury accommodation. See www.blairscove.ie
Blake Hill A house on the estate of the Provost and Fellows of Trinity College, Dublin, occupied by the Blakes of Menlo in the late 18th century/early 19th century. Thomas Blake of Brendrum, county Galway, married Mary Lynch, granddaughter of Sir Roebuck Lynch Blosse, 2nd baronet, and they were the parents of the 9th and 10th Blake of Menlo baronets. By the time of Griffith's Valuation the most valuable house in the townland of Breandrim was a herd's house of £4.15 occupied by C. B. Kenny. On the 25-inch edition Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s Breandrim House is recorded as "in ruins". Old yard walls remain at this site.
Blake's Lodge Built prior to 1838, this house may have been a sporting lodge or steward's house of the Blakes. It is labelled as "Blake's Lodge" on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map. At the time of Griffith's Valuation, the townland of over 100 acres was owned by Patrick Blake but no buildings are recorded. It is not labelled on the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s. A later house is visible at the site and Robinson writes that the orchard walls remain.
Blarney Castle The original 15th century castle belonged to the McCarthys of Muskerry. In 1786 Wilson describes Blarney as the "very fine seat, with ample and beautiful demesnes, of Mr. Jeffreys". Lewis wrote in 1837 that Blarney Castle was purchased in 1701 by Sir James Jefferyes, Governor of Cork [from the Hollow Sword Blades Company] who “ soon after erected a large and handsome house in front of it, which was the family residence for many years, but is now a picturesque ruin”. A new house was built in 1874 on the demesne lands by the Colthurst family and is still occupied by them.
Bleach At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Charles Graves was leasing property from the Villiers-Stuart estate which included a house and mill. The complex was valued at over £37. By the later nineteenth century Bleach House is shown here but the mill in not shown. A house is still extant at the site.
Blenheim (Gaultiere) Miss Eliza Ridgeway was leasing this property from the Beresford estate in 1848, when it was valued at £29 18s. It is still extant and occupied.
Blenheim House At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Robert Carroll was leasing this property from Eliza Ridgeway when it was valued at £20. It is still extant and occupied. It is named as Blenheim House on both the 6-inch and 25-inch Ordnance Survey maps though it now seems to be known as Blenheim Lodge.
Blenheim Lodge Leased by Roger Sweetman from Lord Waterford's estate at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £35.Lewis refers to it as the seat of Pierce Sweetman in 1837. It is still extant and operated as a guesthouse known as Blenheim House.
Blenheim Lodge
Blindwell In 1786 Wilson refers to Blindwell as the seat of Mr. Kirwan. It was held in fee by Martin S. Kirwan at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at almost £18. A fireplace still marks the site of the house which was demolished in the early 20th century. After 1900 this property was owned by the Websters, Nolans and now by the Fair family. Part of Blindwell also belonged to the Agricultural Institute.
Bloomfield Built circa 1776, it was the seat of the Ruttledge family. At the time of Griffith's Valuation it was held in fee by Robert Ruttledge and valued at £50. It was also the seat of Robert Ruttledge in 1894. Sold to the Land Commission in 1924 and later abandoned following a fire.
Bloomfield Johnston states that Bloomfield was once part of the Phibbs estate before passing into the ownership of the Martins of Cleaveragh. In 1814 it was occupied by William White. James Martin owned the property at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at almost £6 and leased to Joseph Robinson. It remained in the Robinson family until the twentieth century and was demolished in 1948.
Bloomfield In 1786 Wilson writes that Bloomfield Lodge was occupied by Mr. Bloomfield. In 1837 Bloomfield was occupied by Edmund Scully, fifth son of James Scully of Kilfeacle and by Edmund's son, Carbery Scully, in 1840 and at the time of Griffith's Valuation. He held the property from Lady Waller and the buildings were valued at £29. George M. Finch was living at Bloomfield, Newport in the 1870s. Bloomfield is still extant.
Bloomfield In the possession of John Farrell in 1814 and of H. O'Farrell medical doctor in 1837. In the mid 19th century held by the Reverend Peter Toler in fee and valued at £10. Toler appears to have purchased Bloomfield from the sale of the Cargins Park estate by the trustees of Daniel Kelly.
Blossomfort Hajba refers to John Wrixon of Blossomfort in 1703. Wilson, writing in 1786, refers to Blossom-fort as the seat of Mr. Wrixon. The present house, occupied by William Bullen in 1814 and by J. Smith in 1837 was built by the Wrixons probably in the early 19th century. In the mid 19th century Blossomfort was the residence of Thomas Haynes who held the property from Benjamin Wrixon. It was valued at £14. Sold by the Wrixons to the Longfields of Longueville, Blossomfort became the residence of their agent, Richard Smith. This house was reconstructed following a fire in the early 1900s and is still extant.
Blossomgrove Blossomgrove was the residence of William Casey in the early 1850s. He held the house valued at £22 and 335 acres from Simon Dring. A house is still extant at the site.
Boathaven Lodge Like Oldhead House, a summer residence, owned by the Browne family, Marquesses of Sligo, and let to various persons. At the time of Griffith's Valuation it was leased by Hugh Wilbraham and valued at £14. It is labelled Boathaven Lodge on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map but does not appear on the 25-inch edition of the 1890s. Modern building occupy the site now.
Boeeshil House At the time of Griffith's Valuation William Shanley was leasing a property at Boeeshil, barony of Carrigallen, incuding a house and corn mill, valued at £20, from the Percy estate. There are three mills shown at the site on the 1st edition 6" OS map, including a corn, bleach and flax mill. Lewis records this property as belonging to the Gerard family.
Bohagh Lodge At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Robert Glancey was leasing a house valued at £6 and over 500 acres at Bohagh, barony of Castlereagh from Travers R. Blackley.
Bolane Bollane Cottage was occupied by Arundel Hill in 1837. A house at Bolane was the residence of Thomas Hanly in the early 1850s and valued at £16. It was held from Daniel D. Power. A house is still extant at this location and occupied.
Bookeen Glebe Burton Persse was leasing this house to Rev. Robert Graham at the time of Griffith's Valuation. In the nineteenth century, the house was used as the residence of the incumbent at Bookeen Church. It was later purchased by the Aitken family who had served as Land Agents for the Clancarty estate at Coorheen, outside Loughrea. The house has been renovated and is extant and occupied.
Booladurragha South William O'Neill was occupying a house in this townland at the time of Griffith's Valuation, the buildings were valued at £15+ and the property was held from the Duke of Devonshire. The Duke is given as the occupier of this house in 1906. A house still exists at this site. Boulta House now functions as a guest house.
Bopeep Lodge A Blakeney property that was leased to H. French in the 1830s and to Robert French in the 1850s.
Boskill Lewis records B. Friend residing at Baskill in 1837. The Ordnance Survey Field Name Book records two houses. Boskill House the original residence of the Frends dating back to the 17th century and located at the northern point of the townland. It was at the end of the 1830s a thatched house which had been converted into a stable. Boskill Lodge (marked on the first Ordnance Survey map as Boskill House) was built in 1800 by Captain Benjamin Frend, at a cost of about £600. At the time of Griffith's Valuation Benjamin Friend junior occupied this house which was valued at £18. In 1906 a mansion house in the townland of Templemichael valued at £30.15 shillings was the residence of Edith M. Minchin and Agnes E. Rose. The Frends and the Roses of Ardhu House were related. The Irish Tourist Association surveyor in 1942 records the burning of this house in the Civil War and that there was "no trace of the house now".
Bosnetstown The Bennett family were resident at Bosnetstown from the early 19th century. Charles Bennett of Bosnetstown was a coroner for county Limerick in the 1810s. Located on the estate of Lord Lisle this house was occupied by George W[heeler] Bennett in 1814 and 1837 and in the early 1850s by George Bennett. The property was valued at £14. In the 1870s George Wheeler Bennett of Kilfinane held 156 acres in the county. The Bennett also lived in other houses closeby at various times for example Kilfinane House. http://members.iinet.net.au/~nickred/trees/bennett.pdf
Bouladuff A house beside the main road from Thurles to Borrisoleigh, occupied by Thomas O'Meara and held from the Earl of Clonmell in the mid 19th century, when the buildings were valued at £12.13 shillings. The Ordnance Survey Name Books also note it as the residence of "Mr. Thomas Omar".
Bowen's Court Built in the 1770s by Henry Cole Bowen this house was the seat of the Bowen family until 1959 when it was sold by the author Elizabeth Bowen. Wilson, writing in 1786, refers to it as Faraghy, the seat of Mr. Cole Bowen. It was held in fee by Mrs. Eliza Bowen at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £75. In 1942 the Irish Tourist Association Survey noted that the house had been attacked during the 1798 rebellion. Bowen's Court was demolished in 1961.
Boyhill House Richard Persse was leasing a house valued at £5 from Burton Persse at Boyhill, barony of Athenry at the time of Griffith's Valuation. In 1906 it was still the property of Burton Persse who also held almost 300 acres of untenanted land in the locality. Some ruins and farm buildings still remain at the site.
Boyle Grove Boyle Grove was the residence of William Boyle in 1814 and of J. Boyle in 1837. The 1821 Census for Dromcarra records William Boyle, a gentleman farmer aged 65 and his wife Sophia, their two sons, William and James, and their daughters, see http://myhome.ispdr.net.au/~mgrogan/cork/inch_1821_cen.htm#Dromcarra By the time of Griffith's Valuation the house was occupied by Devonshire Hawkes who held it from the Court of Chancery. It was valued at £12.15 shillings. In March 1852 Boylesgrove, the estate of William Boyle, was advertised for sale. The rental records that the house was let to Devonsher P. Hawkes for 7 years in 1849 by the Court of Chancery. A house still exists at the site.
Boytonrath T. O'Meagher was the proprietor of Boytonrath in 1814. The Ordnance Survey Name Books refer to Richard Anderson as the occupant in 1840. In the early 1850s Henry Andrews was the occupier holding the property from the representatives of William Roe. The buildings were valued at £12+. A house and farm are still extant at the site.
Brabazon Park Built by George Brabazon in 1777. In 1786 Wilson refers to it as "the fine seat of George Brabazon with beautiful demesnes".Slater refers to it as the seat of George Rutledge in 1846. It was held in fee by Captain Hugh Brabazon at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £30. Sold by the Congested District Board to the Sisters of Mercy circa 1920s, who ran a domestic economy school there for many years. It was demolished in the later twentieth century to make way for the building of a health care facility. Part of the demesne is now Swinford Golf Course and Community Sports Facility.
Brackernagh Lodge A house valued at £18 at Brackernagh, parish of Kilcloony, barony of Clonmacnowen, was being leased by the Clancarty estate to Miss L. Trench at the time of Griffith's Valuation. This is most likely the house which appears on the 6-inch OS map as Brackernagh Lodge. The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage notes that it was previously known as Mount Catherine. It is still extant and occupied.
Brackloon House At the time of Griffith’s Valuation, James Hickson was leasing this house, valued at £10, to James Moriarty. On the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map this property is labelled "hotel". In 1786 Wilson refers to "Bracklow-Inn" on this road.
Brade House John Swanton was leasing this property from Rev. Maurice Townsend at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £15 10s. Lewis had noted it as the seat of Rev. E.P. Thompson in 1837. It was the residence of Samuel Jervois in 1814. Taylor and Skinner's 1783 map also indicate it as a Jervois residence. In 1786 Wilson refers to it as the seat of Mr.Jervis. In 1906 it was owned by Katherine Townsend and valued at £44 5s. There is still an extant house at the site.
Branchfield (Duke) At the time of Griffith's Valuation Alexander Duke was leasing property valued at £8 with almost 300 acres, at Branchfield, barony of Corran, from Jemmet Duke. Lewis records Branchfield as the seat of Rev. William Duke in 1837. Wilson notes Branchfield as the seat of Mr. Duke in 1786, remarking that the ruins of Coolteem Castle are nearby. Branchfield House has been offered for sale in recent times.
Branchfield House (Leyny) The residence of the McKim family for many generations, Branchfield was enlarged and extended in the later nineteenth century. At the time of Griffith's Valuation it was held from Catherine Gore by Patrick McKim and valued at £5. McTernan states that the lands were sold to the Congested Districts Board in 1910, though the family retained the house. It is currently undergoing renovation.
Brandon Lodge The Ordnance Survey Field Name Books record Jane Hussey in possession of Brandon Lodge in the 1830s, describing it as a "thatched house about 40 by 20 feet on rising ground". At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Mrs. Hussey was leasing the property from Robert Hickson when it was valued at £3. The house is labelled Brandon Lodge on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map but has disappeared by the time of the 25-inch edition in the 1890s.
Brandy Hall Daniel Leah yheld this property in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation though it is not clear if he was occupying it. It was valued at almost £5. The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage suggests it was built c.1830 and altered in the early twentieth century. It is still extant and occupied and has been offered for sale in recent years.
Breaghwy Lodge A house known as Breaghwy Lodge was the estate home of the family in the early 19th century. In 1786 Wilson refers to Breafy as the seat of Mr. Browne. This building was later replaced by a large Victorian house which was the residence of D.A Browne in 1894. It now functions as Breaffy House Hotel,
Bredagh/Breda A sale notice in the Landed Estates Court includes the house and lands at Bredagh as part of the Cruise estate. At the time of Griffith's Valuation Cruise was leasing 88 acres in this townland from Robert Ridge but there is no house on the property.
Breeda House Roger G. Davis held a house in fee, valued at £17, in this townland at the time of Griffith's Valuation. Breeda House is labelled on the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s. A house is still extant at the site.
Breeogue Matthew Walsh was leasing this property from the Earl of Erne's estate at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at almost £6. Breeogue House is still extant and occupied.
Brees/Brize The original castle was the home of the Moore family in the 17th century. A house was later built which was the home of the Coghlan family in the early 19th century and was occupied by John and Mathew Anderson at the time of Griffith's Valuation, see http://familyhistory.oram.ca/burrishoole/?page_id=1345 . A house is still extant at this site.
Bregoge House A house reputed to incorporate the remains of an old castle. Bregoge Castle was occupied by J. Rogers in 1837 and by John Rogers in the early 1850s. The property was held from the Earl of Egmont and the buildings were valued at £7. The Irish Tourist Association survey in the 1940s notes it as the residence of "Mr.Ryan, a commercial traveller". The house is still a family home.
Brewsterfield House Daniel Reardon was leasing Brewsterfield House from the representatives of Rev. B. Herbert at the time of Griffith’s Valuation, when it was valued at £13 10s. Lewis notes it as the seat of Rev. B. Herbert in 1837. Bary suggests that it was built by Sir Francis Brewster in the early 18th century but may have been added to later by the Herberts. It later passed to the Orpen family through marriage and may have been resided in by their agent. The original house was demolished in 1985. There are modern buildings on the site including holiday cottages.
Brick Field At the time of Griffith's Valuation William Phibbs held a property valued at £6 at Knockbrack, barony of Corran. In 1906 this property was valued at £11.
Brickhill The home of the Maghlin family in the early 18th century, it passed by marriage to the Blood family. Occupied by the Lysaght family in the mid 18th century. Edward Lysaght, songwriter and lawyer, known as 'Pleasant Ned' was born at Brickhill in 1763. The house is not named on the first Ordnance Survey map and a 20th century house now occupies the site. [Grid reference is approximate].
Bride Park Hajba writes that the Reverend Stephen Rolleston built this house in the 1770s. In 1814 it was inhabited by the Reverend Spread and in the mid 19th century by Thomas Power who held it from Mrs Elina Greaves and others. The buildings were valued at £20+. Bride Park remained the home of the Power family until the early 20th century. This house has recently been renovated and restored.
Bride View Occupied by Samuel Hawkes and held from the representatives of William Hawkes at the time of Griffith's Valuation. The buildings were valued at £13.10 shillings. The property at this location is labelled Knockanemore House on the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s. There is still an extant house at the site.
Bride Villa Hajba writes that this building was originally a coach inn. By the time of Griffith's Valuation Edward Barry a doctor was resident. He held the property valued at £14.15 shillings from Viscount Riversdale. This house is stil inhabited.
Bridestown Leet records the Reverend Edward Carleton as resident at Bride-town, Rathcormack. E. Morgan was the proprietor in 1837 and at the time of Griffith's Valuation, holding the property in fee. The buildings were valued at £42. Bence Jones writes that the Morgans sold the property in the second half of the 19th century having been ruined by the gambling of Lady Louisa Morgan, known as "Unlimited Loo". Later the home of the Lindsay and Horgan families and still occupied.
Bridgemount House (Drum) The home of the Acton family in the 19th century and the seat of G.H.Acton in 1894. At the time of Griffith's Valuation it was held in fee by George Acton and valued at £10. It was later the home of the Coyne family and is still extant and occupied.
Bridgemount House (Dunmanway) Leased by Daniel Connor Jun. from Daniel O'Sullivan at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £10 10s. A house still occupies the site.
Bridgeview Sir T. Herbert was leasing a property to Capt. W. Dalton at the time of Griffith’s valuation, when it was valued at £17. Bary states that this house was also occupied by the Misses Herbert and by Lady Godfrey at different times in the 19th century. It is no longer extant and modern houses have been built on the site.
Bridgeville Park Richard Orpen was leasing this property to Henry Orpen at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £7 15s. Capt. H. Orpen was recorded by Lewis in this property in 1837. In 1814, Leet mentions it as the seat of Henry Orpen. It is described as "in ruins" on the 1895 map.
Brierfield The Hawkes family built a chapel of ease at Brierfield in 1720. Brierfield was their main residence in the 18th and 19th centuries. Sold to Cox Cotton in the late 19th century, no longer extant.
Brinny House Brinny House was being leased by J.H. Wheatley to Rev. George Nash at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £30. In October 1854, it, together with the rest of Nash's property at Brinny, was offered for sale in the Encumbered Estates Court. The house is described in the sale notice as "in good repair". Lewis refers to it as the seat of J. Nash in 1837. In the late 1770s and 1780s it was the residence of Nash esq. In 1942 the Irish Tourist Association Survey referred to "a semi-derelict old mansion near Brinny Bridge, the reputed residence of Seán Dearg Nash, tyrannical provost of Bandon, 1690-1724". The original house is no longer extant.
Brinny Rectory Brinny Rectory was held in fee by Rev. James Gollock at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £25. The house is still extant and occupied.
Briska House Leased by Robert Acheson from Col. Palliser in 1851 when it was valued at £11. On the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s it is named Briska House. A house is still extant at the site.
Britfieldstown The seat of the Roberts family in the 18th and 19th centuries. A small lithograph of the house is included in the sale rental of 1851. It was being leased by Sir Thomas Roberts to Michael Roberts at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £40. A second Roberts property in the same townland, valued at almost £8, was being leased to James D. Barry. Lewis refers to Britfieldstown as the seat of Sir T. Roberts in 1837. In 1854 Britfieldstown was purchased by Luke J. Shea in the Encumbered Estates Court. Bence Jones writes that it later became the home of the MacDonald family, sold by them in 1958 and derelict in the 1970s. It is no longer extant though several other estate buildings survive.
Brittas Castle The original castle was burnt circa 1820 (Bence Jones) when the owner was Henry Grace Langley. His nephew Major Henry Langley began to build a Medieval Revival castle to the design of William V. Morrison but died when only the gate tower was completed. The Irish Tourist Association surveyor wrote that it was to be a replica of Warwick Castle. In 1840 the Ordnance Survey Name Books commented that Brittas Castle was "a modern unfurnished building on a most magnificent scale but in all probability it will never be finished"! In the mid 19th century Henry Langley held the castle valued at £30 from the Court of Chancery. The sale rental of December 1853 records Thomas Kirwan as the tenant of the castle and 464 acres for 7 years from 25 March 1851 pending the cause of Langley v Langley. From 1853 Brittas belonged to the Knox family who lived in a single storey house located behind the gate tower. This house was described as a mansion house in 1906, valued at £25 and occupied by Fitzroy Knox.
Brittas House Built in the late 19th century by James O'Heney/Heney of Cashel and valued at £25 in 1906. Brittas House is now a stud farm belonging to Peter Magnier.
Broadlands The home of the Knox Gore family, let to Patrick C Howley in the 1830s. It was leased by John Knox, of the Rappa Castle family, at the time of Griffith's Valuation when the house was valued at £15 10s. . A house is still extant at this site.
Brook Lodge The Lord Chancellor is given as the occupier of this house at the time of Griffith's Valuation. The Court of Chancery may have held the property from John Denehy at this time. The buildings were valued at £13. In 1942 the Irish Tourist Association Survey notes that it was once the residence of General Sir Thomas Dennehy and was then owned and occupied by James Scannell. A new house is now located on the site.
Brook Lodge The Ordnance Survey Name Books refer to Brook Lodge in the south of this townland. The house is labelled Brook Lodge on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map but seems to have disappeared by the time the 25-inch edition was published in the 1890s. Modern buildings occupy the site now.
Brook Lodge/Dangan Ville Occupied by William O'Connell in 1814 and by Pierce O'Brien who held it from Pierce Creagh in the mid 19th century, when the house was valued at over £13. By the 1870s this house, which is labelled Brooke Lodge on the 25-inch map of the 1890s, was the residence of Nicholas Henry Martin. A house is still extant at this site.
Brook Ville (Kilmacabea) Leased by John Morris to John Hungerford at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at almost £8, Marriage records for the area record it was later the residence of the Wolfe family. On the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map the building at the site is labelled Corran House. The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage describes the property as a miller's house.
Brook Watson Feltham Watson occupied Brook Watson in 1837 and at the time of Griffith's Valuation when the house was valued at £26 and held from the representatives of Peter Holmes. By 1870 in the hands of the Brereton family.
Brookdale House A house occupied by Mr Robert Atkins in 1814 and described by Lewis in 1837 as the seat of A. Ormsby. Arthur Ormsby was married to Margaret the sister of Robert Atkins (of Firville). Margaret Ormsby was the immediate lessor of the house in the early 1850s when it was valued at £32 and occupied by John Bull. William Welland was tenant when the property part of the estate of Henry Wigmore was advertised for sale in 1871.
Brooke Lodge In 1848,Rev. Henry Bolton was leasing this property from Lord Waterford's estate when it was valued at over £29. The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage states that this house was built in the nineteenth century on the site of an earlier house owned by the Penrose family. It is still extant and occupied.
Brookfield D. Cambie is recorded as the proprietor of Brookfield, Nenagh in 1814. The Ordnance Survey Name Books refer to Brookfield as the residence of E. Talbot but "Couns. Geddy [Grady] was the proprietor. In the mid 19th century John Parker was resident, holding the property from Henry D. Grady. The Parkers and Gradys were related. The house was valued at £17 and is still in use as a residence. John Parker was still resident in the 1870s. John's only daughter, Annie, married William James Reeves in 1892 and their eldest son was Henry Parker Reeves. This family is documented in the archive at Damer House, Roscrea.
Brookfield (Bandon) Godfrey Baldwin was leasing this house from the representatives of Hugh Levinge at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £15. It is still extant though in need of refurbishment.
Brookfield (Carrigaline) James Morgan was leasing this property valued at £24 from the Earl of Shannon's estate at the time of Griffith's Valuation. The house is no longer extant.
Brookfield House Arthur Loftus Tottenham was leasing a house valued at £14 to James Tate here in 1856.
Brookhill Brookhill was situated on church land held by the Gonnes, who leased the house to the Kirwans in the late 1770s. Occupied by the Lambert family from the 1790s to the 1940s when it was sold to Gerald Maguire, a solicitor in Claremorris. Now the home of the Noone family.
Brookhill (Rossinver) Brookhill is described as the residence of Capt. Johnston in 1835. At the time of Griffith's Valuation, it was occupied by Johnston Sharpe and valued at £10. In 1894 Slater notes that it was the seat of Capt. Forbes Johnston. It is the only Johnston residence still extant.
Brookhill House In 1786 Wilson refers to Brookhill as the seat of Mr. Lowe. The 1st edition Ordnance Survey map shows Brookhill house, "in ruins", in Farranshea townland, parish of Peppardstown. An old manor house, also in ruins, is shown as well. The Ordnance Survey Name Books, in 1840, describe the site as "two large houses, one having its eastern end and the other, its eastern side, joining the ruins of the Old Manor House". At the time of Griffiths' Valuation, the townland was in the possession of the Hackett estate and the houses are described as "in ruins". The ruins are not shown on the later 25-inch map of the 1890s. A house in the adjoining townland of Everardsgrange is labelled Brook Hill on the 1890s map. This house is still extant and, in 2021, was offered for sale. [Grid Ref. S228360]
Brooklawn Occupied by James Taaffe in 1814. The residence of the Roman Catholic Bishop of Achonry in the mid 19th century. Still extant but not occupied. This house is now situated in county Roscommon.
Brooklawn Labelled Brooklawn House on both the First and 25-inch editions of the Ordnance Survey map though the buildings are slightly apart. In 1837 this house was the residence of a branch of the Blake family. At the time of Griffith's Valuation the house was leased to Michael McDermott by Thomas J. Blakely [sic]. It is no longer extant.
Brooklawn A Blake home occupied by John Griffin in 1814. At the time of Griffith's Valuation Charles Blake held the townland of Fartamore from James Lynch. A house valued at £10 was being leased from him by the Bord of Works. Fartamore is still extant but unoccupied.
Brooklodge This house situated in the 6 acre townland of Brooklodge was the residence of Henry Marsden and his wife in the first part of the 19th century. By the time of Griffith's Valuation the Reverend Pierse Drew was resident. He was rector of Youghal and a member of the family of Drew of Mocollop Castle, county Waterford. The Reverend Drew held the property from John Pollock and it was valued at £40.
Brooklodge This property was leased to Christopher French by Ambrose Deane on 16 June 1775 for 1 life and 99 years. He built a house which later became a Blake residence held from the Skerretts, who had inherited it from the Deanes. It was occupied by Martin J. Blake at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £40. The house is now a ruin.
Brooklodge House A house and paper mill valued at £30 held by Mary Eliza Phair from the Reverend Robert Bury at the time of Griffith's Valuation. This Phair family were involved in paper mills in a number of townlands in this locality.
Brookpark House (Dunmanway) A property in the town of Dunmanway leased by Martha and Catherine Cox to John Hamilton in 1851 when it was valued at £16. It is still extant and well-maintained.
Brookville Home of Cornelius O'Callaghan who held it from the Reverend Robert Bury in the mid 19th century. The buildings were valued at £35.
Brookville Occupied by Charles Janns in 1814, by J. Mahon in 1837 and by Luke Brady who held the property from Anne and Eliza Griffin at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £16.
Brookville In 1840, the Ordnance Survey Name Books describe Brookville as "of very large dimensions, in very good repair, the residence of James Sadlier". He still lived at Brookville in the mid 19th century when the house was valued at £30 and held from James H. Smith Barry. This house, located on the south side of Tipperary town, is still a residence.
Brookville Lewis records Brookville as the seat of Martin White in 1837.