Landed Estates
NUI Galway

Browse Houses

Search Results: Returned 4893 records. Displaying results 101 – 200

House name Description
Anna Sir William Godfrey was leasing this property to Cornelius Murphy at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £10 5s. Lewis records it as the residence of Reverend O'Connor, PP, in 1837. In 1814 Leet mentions Annagh as the seat of Giles Rae. Bary writes that it was built by the Godfreys in the eighteenth century and was lived in by various members of that family until the early nineteenth century when it was occupied by tenants. It was tragically burnt to the ground in the late twentieth century. Sir William was leasing a second property in this townland to Willam R. Burke, valued at £8 10s.
Annabella House Smith records Courthorp Clayton as resident at Anabell in 1750. The Hoares were resident at Annabelle in the late 18th century as Wilson refers to it as the seat of Mr. Hoare in 1786. The house was occupied by Richard Harris Purcell in 1814 and in 1837 and by Elizabeth Purcell at the time of Griffith's Valuation. She held the property from the Earl of Limerick and the buildings were valued at £35. This house was demolished in the latter half of the 19th century and the County Council office now stands on the site.
Annadale At the time of Griffith's Valuation, William Slack was leasing the house at Kiltubbrid from the Ecclessiastical Commissioners when it was valued at £11. Lewis also records it as the residence of the Slack family. According to the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage survey, Annadale House was built c.1760. It is still extant and occupied.
Annadale Lewis refers to Anadale as the seat of C. Colter in 1837. At the time of Griffith’s Valuation, Henry Blennerhassett was leasing a house at Annadale, parish of Killorglin, valued at £11 10s from a Mr. Thompson. Bary states that this is likely to be Peter Thompson whose wife was a Blennerhassett. The house is still extant though possibly not inhabited.
Annagh The townland of Annagh was in the possession of the Stacpooles from the early 18th century and the house was probably built in the second decade of that century. In the 1770s William Stacpoole moved from Annagh to Eden Vale. Thomas Heher was living in the house in 1814 and by the time of Griffith's Valuation George Brew was resident. The house was a ruin in the early 20th century.
Annagh In 1841 the Ordnance Survey Name Books describe Annagh as "a good dwelling house, the residence of John Kennedy". At the time of Griffith's Valuation, it was valued at £10, occupied by John Kennedy and held from George Kinahan. In 1906 held by the representatives of George Bolton. This house is now a ruin.
Annagh Annah was the residence of J. Minchin in 1837 and was held by John Minchin in fee in the mid 19th century when the buildings were valued at £18.10 shillings. Falkner J. Minchin was the occupier in 1906 and Commander Minchin in the early 1940s. Named on the first edition Ordnance Survey map as Annagh Lodge. This house is still a residence.
Annagh In 1786 Wilson refers to Annagh as the seat of Mr. Bodkin. It was held in fee by Robert Bodkin at the time of Griffith's Valuation when the buildings were valued at £25. Annagh was the seat of M. Bodkin in 1894. The original house is no longer extant but old and extensive farm buildings still remain as well as an occupied house built in 1967.
Annagh This townland was in the possession of Thomas Tyrle (Tyrrell) at the time of Griffith's Valuation. No house there has a significant valuation. In 1786 Wilson had noted Annagh as the seat of Mr. Dillon.
Annagh Annaghmore
Annagh Castle Annah Castle was the home of Joseph O. Tabourdeau in 1837 and of Arburthard Goold in the mid 19th century. Goold held the property from John Minchin and the buildings were valued at £20. This building is no longer extant.
Annagh Cottage (Kiltartan) In 1786 Wilson refers to Annagh as the seat of Mr. Burke. Redmond Burke is recorded as residing at Annagh in 1814. The house at Annagh, barony of Kiltartan, was occupied by Redmond Burke at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £10. Redmond Burke of Annagh, sold property in the Land Judges' Court in 1882. Annagh Cottage does not appear on the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s and no trace remains of it now.
Annagh Lodge At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Thomas Whitney was leasing a house valued at £12 to Edward Frazer, at Aughnacloy, barony of Tirerrill. In 2006 Annagh Lodge was offered for sale by Raymond Potterton estate agents, in county Meath. The house details claim that Annagh Lodge was built by the Frazer family (from Scotland), around 1800. McTernan, however, notes that the house was reputedly built by a landlord named Hewitson.
Annagh More House (Cork) In 1786 Wilson refers to Anagh as the seat of Mr. Barter. The representatives of Benjamin Roberts were leasing this property from Rev. W.C. Brent and others at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £18. In the late 1870s, it was the seat of the Barter family. The derelict remains of Annagh More remain at the site.
Annaghbeg The home of the Minnitt family in the 18th and 19th centuries, occupied by Joshua Minnitt in 1814. The Ordnance Survey name books describe it as " good dwelling house" in 1840. It wa the residence of Joshua R. Minnitt in 1837 and in the early 1850s. He held the property from the representatives of Eccles Cuthbert and the house was valued at £37. This house is still a country residence.
Annaghbeg House John Moor lived at Anabeg in 1749 and in 1814 this was the residence of Edmund Moore. In the 1830s it is described by the Ordnance Survey Name Books as the residence of F. Grady and in bad repair. Charles Bailey was leasing the property at Annaghbeg, parish of Ahascragh, barony of Clonmacnowen from Hubert Moore at the time of Griffith's Valuation. Annaghbeg House is described as "in ruins" on the 1948 edition of the 6-inch OS map. Another house, known as Annaghbeg Cottage is located nearby at M823356. Buildings are still extant at the latter site.
Annaghcallow The property at Annaghcallow was leased by John Ryder from Cornelius O'Kelly at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £3. A farm still exists at the site.
Annaghdown A house at this site on the First Edition Ordnance map is labelled Annaghdown House. The current house was built in 1868 by the Blake family It is still occupied and well maintained.
Annaghkeen The castle was in ruins by the late 1830s.
Annaghmore (Nymphsfield) Annaghmore has been the principal seat of the O'Haras since medieval times. An earlier house on the site had been demolished by 1684. It's successor was replaced by the present house c.1820. That house was known in the eighteenth and early nineteenth century as Nymphsfield and is described by McParlan in 1802. In 1786 Wilson refers to Nymphsfield as the pleasant seat of Mr. O'Hara. The name of the house was changed back from Nymphsfield to Annaghmore in the early 19th century and the house was further enlarged. In 1894 it was the seat of Capt. Charles K. O'Hara. In 1906 the house was valued at £68. Annaghmore is still extant and occupied by the O'Hara family.
Annaholty Mr Patrick Bourke was resident at Annaholty, Castleconnel, in 1814. In 1841 the Ordnance Survey Name Books describe Annaholty as "a good farmhouse in a demesne with some scattered trees". James Dundon was the occupier in the early 1850s. He held the property from Charles J. Henry and the buildings were valued at £13.11 shillings. A farm residence is still located at this site.
Annakisha The Nangles appear to have held Annakisha from the end of the 17th century and the house may possibly have dated from this time. Pierce Nagle was resident in 1814 and in 1837 and in the early 1850s held the property in fee. The buildings were valued at £22. Sold by Pierce Nagle to the Hamiltons of Castle Hamilton, county Cavan. Hajba writes that the house was derelict by the beginning of the 20th century and it does not appear on later maps.
Annaly Lodge A house built post 1850 as a shooting lodge for the White family. Sold in the late 1870s to the Phelps it later became the property of the Forestry Department. Back in private hands now it is still occupied. [Grid reference is approximate]
Annamore House Maunsell Andrews was leasing this property to Margaret Roche at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £5 5s, on a holding of 170 acres. Barry quotes O'Donovan, who claims the house was built by the Meredith family in the early eighteenth century. It may also have been associated with Lord Northcote's estate. The Roche family occupied the property since the 1840s.
Annebrook House The Ordnance Survey Name Books reported in 1840 that Annebrook House was the residence of Henry Young but that P. Holmes was the proprietor. At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Henry Young was leasing the property, valued at £10+, from the Holmes estate. Buildings are still extant at the site including the remains of substanial farm buildings associated with the farm which is mentioned in the 1840s.
Annefield Built by Anthony Elwood in 1795, the property passed to the Blakes of Windfield, county Galway, in the mid 19th century. It was occupied by Charles Cromie in the 1830s and at the time of Griffith's Valuation by Emerson Dawson. It was sold to the Brannick family early in the 20th century and was bought by a Mr Fleishche in the 1980s, who restored the derelict house. The house was for sale in 2007.
Anner Castle Marked on the first Ordnance Survey map as Ballina House, this residence of the Reverend Nicholas Manderville was valued at £46+ and held by him in fee in the early 1850s. Bence Jones writes that Anner Castle was built in the 1860s "incorporating the old square castle of the Manderville family which had up till then been known as Ballinahy". It was destroyed by fire in 1926 and only the front portion was rebuilt. The Mandervilles were still resident in the 20th century. This property was sold in 2013.
Anner Park In 1837 Lewis records the extensive flour mills and residence of Barclay Clibborn in the parish of Kilgrant. In 1840 the Ordnance Survey Name Books describe the townland of Twomilebridge as " a demesne, consisting of planted ornamental ground, gardens and orchard". In the mid 19th century Barclay Clibburn occupied a house valued at £22 and held from the Putland/Hulse estate. Joseph Clibburn of Two mile bridge owned 20 acres in the 1870s. William Clibborne was resident in 1906 when the house was valued at £30+. This house is still occupied and well maintained.
Anner Ville Anner Ville was the home of Pierce A. Butler in 1814 but by 1837 was in Riall possession. The Ordnance Survey Name Books describe it as "handsomely situated, having a garden, orchard and ornamental ground attached". At the time of Griffith's Valuation Samuel Riall held the house valued at £23.14 shillings from Barclay Clibburn junior. Anner Ville continued to be a Riall residence in the 1870s and is still a fine home.
Annesgift This house was the home of the Glenstanes. In 1814 Anne Glenstanes daughter of John Jacob Glenstanes married Wray Palliser and the house passed into Palliser ownership. Annesgift was occupied by George Ponsonby in 1814, by Major Gough in 1837 and by Colonel W. Palliser and George Ponsonby at the time of Griffith's Valuation. They held the property in fee and the buildings were valued at £32+. This house was occupied by the Hughes family in the first half of the 20th century and is now converted into apartments.
Annesgrove A 19th century house held by James Joynt from Philip McAdam at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £9.
Annesgrove The original house was occupied by Colonel Richard Aldworth in the latter part of the 18th century which Wilson, writing in 1786, refers to it as the seat of Mr. Groves. However, he mentions that near it were "the neat house and beautiful shrubbery of Richard Aldworth". It was reconstructed in the early 19th century (probably post 1814) by Lieutenant General the Honourable Arthur Grove Annesley. Anne-grove, Castletownroche was occupied by William Connor in 1814 and by General Annesley in 1837. The General's residence was valued at £60 in the early 1850s. In 1894 the seat of F.G. Annesley. This house continued to be the residence of the Grove Annesleys in the 20th century. In 1942 the Irish Tourist Authority survey noted that the estate had been divided "in recent years". Annesgrove is surrounded by famous gardens which are open to the public during the summer, see www.annesgrovegardens.com.
Annestown House Rev. John B. Palliser held a vacant property at Annestown in 1850 which was valued at £16. In 1814 it was the seat of St. George Cole. In 1906 it was the property of Wray Palliser and valued at £22. It passed to the Galloway family though the marriage of Sybil Palliser and Harold Galloway before World I. It remained in the Galloway family until 2008 and in 2010 was offered for sale.
Anngrove Bence Jones writes that this was originally a Cotter residence, sold to the Earls of Barrymore before the mid 18th century. Dobson Esq was resident in the 1770s and 1780s. By 1814 Francis Wise was resident and was still resident at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when the house was valued at £30 and held from Sir William Clarke. The house was later inherited by the Gubbins family. Demolished post 1950.
Annmount In the 1770s Falkiner Bart was resident and in 1786 Wilson refers to Annemount as the seat of Sir Riggs Falkiner. Occupied by the Reverend Mr Coghlan in 1814 and in 1837. By the time of Griffith's Valuation Nicholas M. Cummins held this house from the Reverend Coghlan. This house was burned down and all that now remains are the steps.
Annsville House The representatives of Simon Davis were holding this property in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it and the adjacent mills were valued at £45. The latter is labelled Ballinadee Mills and is described as disused on the 25-inch Ordnance survey map of the 1890s. Some buildings still remain at the site.
Applevale Neptune Blood of Applevale was the third son of William Blood of Roxton and Ann Chadwick and they lived at Applevale in the late 18th century. Their son William was murdered at Applevale in 1831 by the Terry Alts. Chartres Brew lived in the house in 1814 and George Davis in 1837 and in the 1850s. William Blood's mother was a Davis of Newcastle, county Galway.The house was leased to Michael Houlihan in 1870. This house is now a ruin.
Arabela House Rev. Arthur Rowan was leasing this property to Hastings Peate at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £20 15s. Lewis records it as the seat of Francis Peet in 1837. The Ordnance Survey Name Books mention that it was the residence of Francis Peet, "of old appearance, built about a century ago". In 1814 Leet notes it as the seat of John Bolton. In 1786 Wilson refers to Arabella as a seat of Mr. Blennerhassett. Bary states that the house was built in the eighteenth century by the Blennerhassetts but that it was lived in by the Rowan family until the mid-nineteenth century. The Peate family occupied it from then until the 1970s. It is still extant.
Araglin Cottage Located on the bank of the Araglin River and built for Robert Viscount Kingsborough, later 4th Earl of Kingston, this was probably the summer residence recently erected by the Honourable Robert King in the parish of Templemologga, referred to by Lewis in 1837. It was offered for sale in July 1851 with 3,951 acres held by the Earl in the barony of Condons and Clangibbon. Sold to the Morlands who leased it as a fishing lodge, this house is now a family home. In the 1870s John Sherlock of Aroglin Cottage, Kilworth, was recorded as the owner of 183 acres in county Cork.
Aran View Weir writes that this house was built by the Macnamaras. Francis Macnamara lived at Arran View in 1837. Occupied by Robert Johnston at the time of Griffith's Valuation, the Johnstons continued to live there until at least the late 1870s. The original building appears to have been demolished and modern housing constructed at the site. The Johnston family were connected with that of Kilmurvey House on the Aran Islands.
Arbourhill A house occupied by J. Antisell in 1837. The Ordnance Survey Name Books describe it as "a good dwelling house, the residence of Joseph Antisell" in 1840. It was valued at £10 when held by Thomas Pyke in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation. There is still an extant house at the site.
Archerstown The home of a branch of the Langley family, occupied at the time of Griffith's Valuation by Henry Langley and held from the Reverend Robert Lockwood. The buildings were valued at £25+. The Langley family continued to live here until the 1970s.
Ardagh Martin Lawlor was in possession of a property valued at £11 5s at Ardagh, at the time of Griffith’s Valuation. There is no house marked on the 1st edition OS map, the Lakeview Hotel appears to have occupied the site in 1895.
Ardagh At the time of Griffith's Valuation Richard Graves Brinkley held extensive property at Ardagh and Bellanascarva, barony of Tirerrill. This had formerly been part of his wife, Hester Lloyd's estate. Ardagh House was then valued at £14. Johnston states that the property at Ardagh was later lived in by Hunter family who acted as agents for the Brinkley estate. Part of the extensive farmyard of Ardagh House has been converted into residential accommodation. An extensive mill complex in the nearby townland of Bellanascarva was leased to Munds Harper at the same time where Brinkley also held a house valued at £30.
Ardagh House At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Ardagh was held by Richard Foreman as a herd's house valued at £2, together with almost 1000 acres. It is labelled Ardagh House on the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s. A house still exists at the site.
Ardagh Lodge Ruane writes that it was built as a yachting lodge in the 1790s for the Palmer family. It was the residence of the Stuart family during the bathing season in the 1830s. Bought by the Stoney family in 1965. A house is still extant at the site.
Ardataggle House A house known as Fisher's Lodge was located in this townland in 1842 but is not visible on the later 25-inch Ordnance Survey map. The townland of Ardataggle was sold by Thomas Fitzgibbon to Thomas Spaight in 1854. Mrs Spaight was living at Ardataggle House in the 1870s and in 1906 Colonel W. F. Fitzgerald owned the mansion house valued at £41 with 428 acres of untenanted land.
Ardavilling The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage dates this house circa 1860. It was the home of John Litton who left it to his nephew Edward F. Litton. At the beginning of the 20th century occupied by Guildford William Jack Stacpoole of the Ballyalla, county Clare, family.
Ardbear House Samuel Jones held this house from Thomas Eyre at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £28. It was described in the sale rental of 1864 as 'substanially and tastefully built', with spacious drawing rooms and 13 bedrooms. It later became a boys' secondary school run by the Franciscan Brothers. A school still occupies the site.
Ardbeg At the time of Griffith’s Valuation, Robert Hickson was leasing this house, valued at £4 and 150 acres, to Richard Norris.
Ardbrack House Ardbrack House was being leased by John Walton from the representatives of John Bleazby at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £16. The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage suggests it was built in the early years of the nineteenth century. It is still extant.
Ardcarn (Lancaster) Thomas Lancaster was leasing this property to Capt. James Bell at the time of Griffith's Valuation. Lewis records it as the residence of Capt. Bell in 1837. The house is still extant and occupied.
Ardcarn Glebe At the time of Griffith's Valuation Viscount Lorton was leasing the Glebe House in Ardcarn parish to Rev. George Griffith when it was valued at £12. It is still extant and is part of a large farming enterprise.
Ardcarne House At the time of Griffith's Valuation John Hackett was leasing Ardcarne House, valued at £25, from Viscount Lorton's estate. The house is still extant and used as a farmhouse.
Ardcloony A late 19th century house incorporating the earlier Bourchier home. Major General John Bourchier married Mary, daughter of Thomas Macnamara of Ardcloony in the mid 18th century and inherited the property. By the time of Griffith's Valuation the house belonged to Francis C. Fitzgerald who held the property in fee. It was valued at £20. Edmond Fitzgerald of Ardcloony owned 214 acres in county Clare in the 1870s. John Connell Fitzgerald was resident in 1906. A house is still extant at the site.
Ardenville A single storey house possibly built for the heir to the Egmont title, Baron Arden, to reside in before succeeding to the title. At the time of Griffith's Valuation it was occupied by James Norcott and valued at £11.10 shillings. Recently extended and still occupied.
Ardfert Abbey William T. Crosbie was in possession of Ardfert Abbey at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £62. Lewis, writing in 1837 and Leet, in 1814, note the house as the residence of the Earl of Glandore.It was the home of Lt-Col. John Darnley Talbot Crosbie in 1894. In 1906 it was the property of L.T Crosbie and valued at £66. Bary writes that the original house built here by the Crosbies was destroyed in the 1641 rebellion and another erected in the early 18th century. The Ordnance Survey Name Books quote the inscription relating to the original house from 1635. It remained the residence of the family until the late nineteenth century when it passed to John Talbot, whose son, William Talbot-Crosbie, then inherited. The house was burnt during the Civil War in 1922 and only the elaborate entrance gate remains..
Ardfinnan Castle A building that has been added too and altered since the 15th century. Occupied by James Prendergast at the the time of Griffith's Valuation, held from the Ecclesiastical Commissioners and valued at £13. In 1894 Slater notes it as a residence of Mrs. Prendergast. Still in use as a residence.
Ardfort House The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage dates this house from approximately 1875. It was the home of the O'Brien family of Thurles and is still extant.
Ardfry Lewis mentions the seat of Lord Wallscourt in the parish of Oranmore but refers to it as Wallscourt rather than Ardfry, which is actually located in the parish of Ballynacourty. The Ordnance Survey Name books mention it as Ardfry House, the residence of Lord Wallscourt At the time of Griffith's Valuation it was being leased by the trustees of Lord Wallscourt's estate to Pierce Joyce when it was valued at £60. The house was built in the late 18th century and altered in 1826. The seat of Lord Wallscourt in 1894 and in 1906. It has been in a derelict state since the mid-20th century. In 2006 it was offered for sale as part of a scheme to create luxury apartments in the building.
Ardgallin At the time of Griffith's Valuation Harloe Baker was leasing a house valued at £7, together with over 80 acres, at Ardgallin, barony of Coolavin, from Viscount Lorton's estate. Lewis also records Ardgallin as the seat of Harloe Baker in 1837. McTernan notes that the Baker family sold their interest to Thomas Bell, of Larkhill House, Quarryfield, in 1887. It came into the ownership of the Cornwall family in the 1920s who are still in possession.
Ardhu A house built post 1850, the seat of the Rose family at the beginning of the 20th century. Now functions as the Clarion Hotel suites.
Ardkeenagh House Michael Plunkett was farming at Ardkeenagh in 1749. In 1814 it was the home of Nicholas Peyton and of Mrs Hawkes in 1837. At the time of Griffith's Valuation the house was vacant but the surrounding lands were held by Patrick Moran from James Somerville. Buildings are still extant at the site.
Ardkeenan A Kelly home at the end of the 18th century which passed to the Cruise family following the marriage of Daniel John Cruise, grandson of Daniel Cruise of Cruise Lodge and Ann Kelly in 1820. Occupied by Edmond Naghten in the 1830s and by Timothy Connell at the time of Griffith's Valuation who purchased the property.
Ardkilly or Ardkelly Gill Gillman was leasing this property to Richard Gillman at the time of Griffith's valuation, when it was valued at £7 10s. He was also the lessor of another unoccupied house in the same townland, valued at almost £9. [Grid Reference is approximate]. In 1837 Lewis referred to Ardkelly as the seat of R. Gillman. A house and farm still exist at the site.
Ardmanagh House John Limerick was leasing this property to Thomas Nicholls at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £10. Substantial modern building has taken place in the area.
Ardmayle/Clonmore Ardmayle House in the townland of Clonmore North is marked on the first Ordnance Survey map. The Prices were resident here from at least the 1770s ad Wilson mentions it as the seat of Mr. Price in the 1780s. "Ardmoyle", Cashel, was the residence of Thomas Price in 1814 and in 1837. Richard Price was the occupant in 1850 holding the house valued at £21.17 shillings from John Hyde. The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage states that the present house dates from circa 1870s and was formerly the wing of an 18th century house demolished in 1951. Louis H. Grubb occupied at house at Clonmore North in 1906 valued at £56. This house is now known as Clonmore.
Ardmore (Dunamon) In 1786 Wilson refers to Ardmore as the seat of Mr. Croaghan. By the 1830s an extensive demesne is shown in the area but no house is visible. The townland is in the possession of St. George Caulfield of Dunamon by the time of Griffith's Valuation.
Ardmore House Richard Roberts held this property in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £55. Lewis refers to is as the seat of J. Roberts in 1837. In 1943 the Irish Tourist Association Survey mentions it as the birthplace of Lieutenant Richard Roberts, Master of the ship, Sirius, the first steamship to cross the Atlantic. Ardmore is still extant and occupied.
Ardmore or Monea House Simon Bagge was leasing this property from the Ecclesiastical Commissioners in 1851 when it was valued at £33. It is labelled as Ardmore House on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map and as Monea House on the later 25-inch edition. The ITA survey indicates that it was sold by John Leonard Bagge in 1921 and subsequently became an Irish college.
Ardmullan Built post 1838 and described as a steward's house at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was occupied by Thomas Pim junior who held it in fee. A mansion valued at £23 was still in the possession of Thomas Pim in 1906. The house no longer exists but some of the yard buildings remain.
Ardnacrow House Though buildings existed at this site in the 1830s Ardnacrow House is only labelled on the later 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s. At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Winthrop Sealy held this property in fee when it was valued at £29. The original house is now ruined and a modern house has been constructed nearby.
Ardnagashel House Samuel Hutchins held this property in fee in 1852 when it was valued at almost £23. Lewis noted it as the seat of A. Hutchins in 1837. In 1906 it was owned by Samuel N. Hutchins and valued at £30. The original house has been demolished and the stableyard converted to self-catering accommodation. The Irish Tourist Association survey of the 1940s mentions that the grounds contained some fine trees including a cork tree which came originally from Kew Gardens.
Ardnageeha Hajba writes that this house was built by Daniel McCartie, a Commissioner of Tithes for the parishes of Cullen and Drishane. The house valued at £12.10 shillings was occupied by his wife Anne McCartie at the time of Griffith's Valuation. The property was held from the Earl of Egmont. Daniel's only child Mary married John Maurice O'Connell, a grandson of Daniel O'Connell. The O'Connell lived at Ardnageeha until 1890 when they moved to Derragh House. The house is still extant though possibly not occupied.
Ardnaglass Wilson, writing in 1786, refers to Ardnaglass as the seat of Mr. Jones, "half a mile beyond the ruins of a castle". The castle he refers to is Ardnaglass Castle, also associated with the Jones family. Earlier, in 1739, Reverend William Henry mentions Ardnaglass as the seat of Loftus Jones. By the time of Griffith's Valuation, this townland was part of the Webber estate, leased by William Graham. He was occupying a property valued at £4. The castle ruins are still extant.
Ardnaree Cottage Ardnaree Cottage dates to at least the early eighteenth century and possibly earlier. It was part of the Gore estate. Wilson, writing in 1786, refers to "Mr. Jones' charming demesne". In 1837 it was the residence of Thomas Jones and in 1857 it was leased by Col Arthur Knox Gore to Anne Hearne when it was valued at £10. The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage notes it as an important component of the domestic built heritage of Ballina. It is still extant and well-maintained.
Ardnaree Rectory At the time of Griffith's Valuation Rev. Joseph Verscoyle was occupying the house at Glebe, parish of Kilmoremoy, valued at £30. This house is no longer extant.
Ardocheasty John B. Wallace was leasing this house from the Carew estate in 1851 when it was valued at £12 5s. Farm buildings are extant at the site.
Ardogeena House At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Richard T. Evanson was leasing this property to Florence McCarthy when it was valued at £10. In 1837, Lewis noted the house as the seat of R.T. Evanson. It is still extant and occupied.
Ardoginna House Leased by Sir Joseph Neale McKenna from the estate of the Duc deCastres until its sale in 1864, when it was bought by McKenna. Formerly a residence of the Coghlan family. Eliza, a daughter of this Coghlan family, married the Duc deCastres. Ardoginna was owned by the McKenna family until the early twentieth century. It was briefly used as an Irish college before the purchase of Monea House for that purpose. Brady notes that it is now a ruin. In the 1780s, both Taylor and Skinner and Wilson had noted a house called Grey Rock as a residence of the Coghlan family in this area.
Ardpaddin Mary Mulcahy was leasing this property from the Earl of Stradbroke's estate in 1850, when it was valued at £10. A substantial farm is still extant at the site.
Ardrum The seat of the Colthurst family, baronets, valued at £85 in the mid 19th century. The Colthursts moved from here to Blarney in the 1870s. However Sir George St John Colthurst is still given as the occupier in 1906 when the house was valued at £45. In 1944 the Irish Tourist Association survey noted it as originally the seat of the Colthursts and still owned by the family. The house is now demolished.
Ardsallagh The home of George Gough in the first half of the 19th century. It is described in the Ordnance Survey Name Books in 1840 as "a gentleman's residence with garden's attached and surrounded with ornamental grounds". It was valued at £37.12 shillings in 1850 and held from George Fennel. In the 1870s Colonel George Frend of Ardsullagh owned 100 acres in county Tipperary. Still in use as a country house.
Ardsallagh House Mrs.Olivia Ronayne was leasing this property from the estate of Lord Stuart de Decies at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £10 10s. It is labelled Ardsallagh House on both the 6-inch and 25-inch Ordnance Survey maps. Extant buildings remain at the site.
Ardskeabeg A property in the possession of the trustees of Dominick Skerrett at the time of Griffith's Valuation. Occupied by the Kelly family in the later 19th century and by their descendants the Canavans until 2000. The house is still extant but no longer lived in.
Ardskeamore The original house was occupied by the Brownes in the 1830s. Charles Kelly was leasing from James Browne in the 1850s when the valuation of the house was £10. By the 1890s this had been replaced by the existing house (M437420) which was renovated in 2006.
Ardtermon Castle Ardtermon was the first property held by the Gore family before the building of Lissadell. McTernan notes that it was granted to Sir Francis Gore and had previously been the property of the O'Hart family. The Gore Booth family moved to Lissadell in the mid eighteenth century. Since 1979 it has been the home of the Schiller family who have restored it to its former glory from total ruin. See www.ardtarmoncastle.com
Ardtully House Richard J.T. Orpen was leasing Ardtully House from John Croker at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £23 5s. In 1814 Leet records it as the seat of Richard O. Townsend while Lewis, in 1837 mentions Ardtully as "the ancient mansion of Richard Orpen Townsend". It was also the seat of the Orpen family in the 1770s and 1780s. Bary states that this property included an earlier castle, which was originally part of the McFineen McCarthy lands forfeited in the seventeenth century. It was granted by the Hollow Blade Company to the Conways but, later in the eighteenth century, the Orpens were occupying the house, subsequently replaced in the nineteenth century. Recorded, perhaps mistakenly, as the seat of R.H.M. Orpen and Sir. R.J.T Orpenm in 1894, in 1906 it was owned by Richard H.M. Orpen and valued at £40. The Scottish-baronial style house was burnt in 1921 but the ruins remain.
Ardvarna Occupied by A. Ross in 1837, John Scully at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £16 and by Edward Jackson Fitzsimons in the 1860s. There is still an extant house at this site.
Arlinstown House James Gillman was leasing Arlinstown House to Thomas Richardson Leane at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £15. A house and extensive farm buildings are extant at this site now.
Arm Lodge William Lloyd was leasing a property valued at £8 to Laurence Henry at Arm, barony of Castlereagh, at the time of Griffith's Valuation. Lewis records this property as Arm Lodge, a seat of W. Lloyd in 1837. In 1814 Arm Lodge was the residence of Mr. John Cotton and in the 1870s of William Garnett. A house is still extant at the site.
Arnasbrack Nicholson Ormsby Fury was leasing a house valued at £5 from the Cooper estate at the time of Griffith;s Valuation. McTernan states that it was the modern seat of the Fury family of nearby Castle Fury. In the early twentieth century the family sold their interest in the property. The house is still extant and occupied.
Arranhill Arranhill was a Stoney home in the late 18th century. Thomas Stoney was resident in 1814 and Thomas George Stoney in 1837. In 1840 the Ordnance Survey Name Books report that "it suffered considerable damage during the storm of 6 and 7 January, 1839. It is occupied at present by Mr. Skelly, land steward to George Walpole, Brusna Mills, Roscrea". The Name Books also note the Marquis of Ormond as the proprietor. Thomas G. Stoney was the occupier in the early 1850s holding the property from the representatives of T.P. Firman. The buildings were valued at £23.10 shillings. This house is described as "in ruins" on the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s and some of these ruins remain.
Ash Hill House The Ordnance Survey Name Books record Ash Hill House, parish of Ballymacelligott, as being a ruin, c.15ft high in the 1830s. It had been built by the Blennerhassetts around 1700 and was later occupied by the Eager family. In 1786 Wilson records Ash-Hill as the seat of Thomas Blennerhasset.
Ash Hill Towers The residence of a branch of the Coote family in the 18th century, possibly held from the Barons Carbery. Ash Hill is referred to by Wilson as the seat of Chudleigh Coote in 1786. Bought by Eyre Evans from Chidley Coote in 1794 (see sale rental 6 July 1878). Eyre Evans held the property in fee throughout the first half of the 19th century. The Ordnance Survey Field Name Book describes this house as having "a most superb new front with towers at each end". At the time of Griffith's Valuation the buildings were valued at £50. Bence Jones writes that Ash Hill Towers became the residence of John Henry Weldon in the later 19th century. The Irish Tourist Association surveyor wrote in 1943 that the property was owned by Captain P.M. Lindsay, nephew of John H. Weldon, who bought the house from the Evans family in 1880. Still extant, this house is the centre of a stud.
Ash Park Ash Park or Park was the home of the Butler family in the 18th and 19th centuries. Occupied by James Butler in 1814 and 1837 and by Captain James Butler at the time of Griffith's Valuation. The buildings were valued at £35+ and held in fee. This house no longer exists.
Ashborough Lewis records Daniel D. Power as resident at Ash Grove in the parish of Ballingarry in 1837. Held Daniel D. Power at the time of Griffith's Valuation and valued at £16 and in his occupation at the time of the 1854 sale. An old outbuilding remains at the location of this house.
Ashbourne A 2 storey house located on the Earl of Limerick's estate, this house was the seat of the Honourable Robert O'Brien in the 1830s. It was occupied by Richard Wilson in the early 1850s and held from Eliza Harvey. Garrett Hugh Fitzgerald's interest in the property was advertised for sale in May 1851. By the 1870s it was the home of the Synan family. This house is now demolished.
Ashbourne (Clonmel) In 1850 William Davis was leasing this property from Abraham Grubb when it was valued at almost £36. The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage indicates it was designed by William Tinsley for the Davis family. It is still extant and occupied.
Ashbourne House In 1851 Edmond Foley was leasing this property from the Devonshire estate when it was valued at £21 10s. It is labelled Ashbourne House on the later 25-inch Ordnance Survey Map.