Landed Estates
NUI Galway

Browse Houses

Search Results: Returned 4893 records. Displaying results 601 – 700

House name Description
Ballyphilip House This property was leased to Samuel Adams Austen and occupied by John Forrest in the early 1850s. When the Newenham's fee of Ballyphilip was for sale in 1865 David Cagney was resident. A house still exists at the site.
Ballyquirk In 1837 Lewis refers to the ruins of Ballyquirk castle "near which is a handsome modern house of that name". Colonel Henry Dwyer was the occupant in the mid 19th century, holding the house valued at £32 and 716 acres from Edward Newingham.
Ballyquiveen A house built post the first edition Ordnance Survey map of circa 1838. John Brindley was leasing a house from Dean Head valued at £5+ at Ballyquiveen at the time of Griffith's Valuation. It is no longer extant.
Ballyrafter House Francis Quinlan, MD, was occupying Ballyrafter at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £23 and leased from the Devonshire estate. In 1837 Lewis refers to it as the seat of M. Quinlan. It is now the Ballyrafter House Hotel. See www.waterfordhotel.com
Ballyre This house was occupied by Crofton Uniacke at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £29.15 shillings and held from Mountifort Longfield. Earlier, in 1786, Wilson refers to it as the seat of Crofton Uniacke. The home of Robert M. Bayly in the 1870s. It is still extant.
Ballyready A house located on the Devonsher estate, occupied by Patrick Bourke in 1814. The house was valued at £12.10 shillings and occupied by John Fetnam at the time of Griffith's Valuation. It is still a family home.
Ballyrichard The Ordnance Survey Name Books describe Ballyrichard as "a good farmer's hosue with offices and garden" in 1840. The house, valued at £12.18 shillings, was occupied by Matthew Hughes and held from Colonel W. Palliser at the time of Griffith's Valuation. Richard H. Hughes of Ballyrichard owned 597 acres in the 1870s. A substantial farm is still extant at the site.
Ballyrickard House Ballyrickard may possibly be the house known as Lettyville on the Taylor and Skinner map from the 1770s. Leet records Daniel Falkener as resident at Ballyrickard in 1814 and Lewis records N. Falkiner as the proprietor. The Ordnance Survey Name Books refer to Ballyrickard as "a commodious house", the residence of Nathaniel Falkiner. In the early 1850s Addison Hone was the occupier holding the property from Richard H. Falkiner. The buildings were valued at £15. This 18th century house is still extant and occupied.
Ballyrisode House Richard B. Hungerford held this property in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £16. In 1906 it was owned by Elizabeth Hungerford and valued at £15 10s. The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage states that the present house is of late nineteenth century date. In 2009 it was for sale.
Ballyrobert Hajba writes that Michael Mackay built a house beside the ruined castle of Ballyrobert in the 1820s and he is recorded as resident there by Lewis in 1837. In the early 1850s the house was valued at £23, occupied by Michael Mackay and held from John Peard. Michael J. Mackey occupied the house in 1906. This house no longer exists.
Ballyrobin Leased by William Hanbury from Josiah Pope at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £12.Original buildings do not seem to be extant at the site which is now situated in county Kilkenny.
Ballyroe Lodge Sir Edward Denny was leasing this property to Pierce Chute at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £17 15s. Bary writes that it was built by Pierce Chute, possibly in 1836, according to O'Donovan. The Chutes continued in residence until the late nineteenth century after which it had a succession of owners. It now forms part of the Ballyroe Heights Hotel complex.
Ballysaggartmore House Held in fee by Arthur Ussher at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £68. Lewis refers to it as the seat of A Keily in 1837 when he describes the demesne as "ample and tastefully planned". Local sources suggest Arthur Keily-Ussher commenced building a lavish castle in 1850. The extravagent entrance depleted his funds and the castle was never completed. It was later purchased by the Woodruffe family. In 1906 it was the property of Richard Woodroffe and valued at £68. The house was burned in 1922 and demolished in the 1930s. The elaborate towers are still extant and part of the demesne is a Forestry Service amenity area.
Ballyseedy Castle Ballyseedy was a seat of the Blennerhassett family for many generations. Charles Blennerhassett was occupying it at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £60. Lewis recorded that Sir Edward Denny was living there in 1837 but that it was a seat of the Blennerhassett family. In 1906 it was owned by Arthur Blennerhassett and valued at £65. The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage (Buildings of Ireland) report states that the house was built c.1760 but renovated and extended at least twice in the nineteenth century. The Irish Tourist Association survey in 1942 reported that the owner then was Miss Hilda Blennerhassett. It remained in the ownership of the Blennerhassett family until later in the twentieth century when it was sold and became Ballyseedy Castle Hotel. [www.ballyseedecastle.com].
Ballyshanny A house on the McMahon estate occupied by Patrick Killeen at the time of Griffith's Valuation and valued at £11. Located close to the ruins of Ballyshanny Castle it is labelled Ballyshanny House on the 1st and subsequent editions Ordnance Survey maps. Ballyshanny is still extant.
Ballyshara Occupied by Henry Evans in 1814 and by Ralph Evans at the time of Griffith's Valuation. He held the property from Reverend Francis Stawell. The buildings were valued at £18. The home of the Duane family in the 20th century, now a ruin.
Ballysheedy A 3 storey house built circa 1749, occupied by FitzGillon in the late 1770s and noted by Wilson as the seat of Gibbon Fitzgibbon in 1786. It was the residence of Michael Furnell in 1814 and occupied by Gibbon T. Fitzgibbon in the early 1850s, when it was held from Admiral Proby and valued at £22. It was ruinous by the publication of the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s.
Ballysheehan Occupied by the Lethams from at least the 1770s and noted by Wilson as their residence in 1786. William Latham is recorded as resident in 1814 and Thomas Brinly in 1850 when the buildings were valued at £28+ and held from Smyth Barry. This house still exists, the centre of a stud.
Ballysheen A house on the Vandeleur estate, occupied by the Walton family for most of the 19th century. Occupied by George Perry in 1814. Valued at £10 at the time of Griffith's Valuation it was renovated in the 20th century. Labelled as Walton Lodge on the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s.
Ballyshoneen A house valued at £13.10 shillings at the time of Griffith's Valuation, occupied by James Cross and held from Anthony Morgan. It is labelled Ballyshoneen on both the 1st and 25-inch edition Ordnance Survey maps. A house and substantial farm still exist at the site.
Ballyslatteen Richard Butler, a younger brother of Thomas Butler of Ballycarron, was resident at Ballyslatteen in 1837 and at the time of Griffith's Valuation. He held the property from the Honourable John Massey and the buildings were valued at £20. Included in the sale of the Earl of Portarlington's estates in June 1856. A building is still located at this site.
Ballysteen Originally known as Balliston House, this early 19th century house was the home of the Murray family. Terence Aubrey Murray was born here in 1810. He was the son of Captain Terence Murray who emigrated to New South Wales, Australia, in 1828. In 1843 Terence A. Murray became MP for New South Wales and in 1869 was granted a knighthood. He died in 1873. Yarralumla, Sir Terence Murray's home in New South Wales, is now the residence of the Governor General of Australia. Ballysteen was inhabited by James Murray in the early 1850s who held the property from the Earl of Clare. The house was valued at £11+ at that time. The Murrays continued to live here until the early 20th century. In the early 1920s, during the War of Independence, the IRA used the house as its local headquarters. Though still extant the house has fallen into disuse.
Ballysteen Home of the Westropp family in the 18th and 19th centuries and occupied by Colonel John Westropp in 1814. The Ordnance Survey Field Name Books circa 1840 state that John Westropp built the house in 1809 on the site of the former house. By 1837 it had passed to his nephew Edmond Odell who had assumed the name Westropp. Ballysteen valued at £40 was held by Edmund Westropp in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation and in 1906 by Richard Westropp when its value had increased to almost £45.
Ballytarsna John Max occupied this house which he held from the Bunbury estate in 1850. The buildings were valued at £16.12 shillings. In 1906 James Grene was resident. Recently renovated this house is still well maintained and occupied.
Ballyteige Originally the home of a branch of the Tuthill family, no large house is marked on the first Ordnance Survey map in this townland. The house was leased to David Conyers of Castletown Conyers in 1885 and to Thomas W. Westropp Bennett in the 1890s. It is now available for hire, see http://www.ballyteigue.com/
Ballythomas Originally a Crofts home, leased to the Bullen family by the mid 18th century. Occupied by Robert C. Bullen at the time of Griffith's Valuation. He held the house valued at £12+ and 111 acres in fee. The Crofts appear to have resumed possession in the late 19th century. Home of the O'Connors in the 20th century.
Ballytivnan House McTernan writes that this was a 2-storey eighteenth century residence, occupied by the Griffith family until the 1830s. Following them it was the home of Jack Taaffe and was damaged on the night of the Big Wind in January 1839. It was later occupied by the Kelly family. Afterwards acquired by the Health authorities and subsequently demolished.
Ballytrasna Located on the Earl of Bandon's estate, occupied by the Reverend B. Gash in 1837 and by Thomas Neville in the early 1850s when the house was valued at £10. The location of this house now appears to be under water.
Ballytrasna House No house with demesne is marked on the first Ordnance Survey map in this townland but by the time of Griffith's Valuation Timothy O'Regan was occupying a house and other buildings valued at £19+ which he held from John Courtenay. Farm buildings are still extant at this site. A property labelled Ballytrasna House is shown on the 25-inch map of the 1890s, located in the next townland of Glenawillin [W876796]. This property was also being leased by O'Regan from the Courtenay estate at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £5+. However, it had become a more substantial property by the 1890s. A house is still extant at the site.
Ballytruckle (Waterford) In 1848, Baron Lefroy is recorded as the lessor of a property at Ballytruckle, barony of Gaultiere, county Waterford. This is possibly Thomas Langlois Lefroy, of Carrigglas, county Longford, Baron of the Exchequer. He had married Mary Paul, of Silver Spring, county Wexford. The house at Ballytruckle was leased to Mrs. Ellen Alcock and valued at £13. The site is now occupied by modern buildings.
Ballyturin At the time of Griffith's Valuation Ballyturin House was the residence of John Bagot. In 1906 John C. Bagot was the owner of the house which was valued at £17. It was located in a commanding position overlooking rolling countryside. In May 1921, an RIC man (District/Inspector Cecil Blake), his wife and two British Army officers (Capt Cornwallis and Lt McCreery) were killed in an ambush by South Galway/East Clare Irish Volunteers at the gates of Ballyturin House. Margaret, Mrs Robert Gregory of Coole Park (Lady Gregory's daughter-in-law) escaped without injury. Ballyturin is now a ruin.
Ballyva House Ballyva house was being leased by James Hugh Smith-Barry to James R. Deane at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £16. Lewis refers to it as the seat of M. Galway in 1837. A house is still extant at the site.
Ballyvackey House Ballyvackey House was held in fee by Mrs. Ellen Alleyn at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £11. In the late 1770s and 1780s it was occupied by the Allen family. It is not shown on the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890 and is no longer extant.
Ballyvallikin In 1850 this property was being leased by John and Margaret Fitzgerald from Lord Waterford's estate when it was valued at £11. It was still part of the Waterford estate in 1906 and valued at £11 5s. Extensive farm buildings still exist at the site.
Ballyvally A house in the possession of the Parker family from the early 19th century, the Reverend Standish Grady Parker was resident in 1814. His brother William Parker was in residence from at least 1837, holding the property from members of the Law family. By the end of the 19th century Robert Gabbett Parker lived in the house, which is still extant.
Ballyvannan The seat of Lord Dunboyne in 1837 and in the mid 19th century of James Crotty who held it from Lord Dunboyne when the buildings were valued at £3. The house is still occupied.
Ballyvaughan The Bushell family were located at Ballyvaughan from the 18th century. The will of Edward Bushell of Ballyvaughan dated 30 July 1778 names his six sons. At the time of Griffith's Valuation Samuel Bushell held buildings valued at almost £13 from John Lindsey. http://www.igp-web.com/IGPArchives/ire/tipperary/wills/bushell01.txt
Ballyvergan House In 1786 Wilson refers to Ballyvergin as the seat of Robert Uniacke. By the time of Griffith's Valuation, this townland is part of the Leader estate. The house, valued at £12 was occupied by James O'Brien. This may be the property labelled Ballyvergan House on the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map in the 1890s.Buildings still exist at the site.
Ballyviniter A Stawell residence in the 18th and 19th centuries, occupied by George C. Stawell in the early 1850s, when the buildings were valued at £15. Stawell held the property in fee. The original house is not extant.
Ballyvodock Thomas Wigmore occupied this house in the mid 19th century. He held it from the representatives of Viscount Midleton and it was valued at £9+.
Ballyvodock House James Barry was living at Ballyvodig House, Middleton, in 1814. In the mid 19th century William Kelleher was the occupier. He held the property from William Oliver Jackson and the buildings were valued at £11. A house and large farm are still extant at the site.
Ballyvolane Hajba writes that Ballyvolane was bought by Sir Richard Pyne of Waterpark, Lord Chief Justice of Ireland, from the Coppingers in the early 18th century. It remained in the possession of the Pyne family until the mid 20th century and is still occcupied. Valued at £44 at the time of Griffith's Valuation, the house was occupied by Jasper Pine who held it from Thomas, George and Henry Walker. By 1906 the mansion house at Ballyvolane was valued at £70+ and occupied by George M.Pyne. It is now run as a guesthouse by the Green family.
Ballyvonare A Barry property from the late 18th century passing through the female line to the Harold/Harold-Barry family. The house was valued at £34 at the time of Griffith's Valuation and was held in fee. In the 1940s the Irish Tourist Association Survey outlined details of the family's history in the area and the existence of a soup kitchen there during the Famine. The Harold-Barrys still live at Ballyvonare.
Ballyvorda A house on the Stackpoole estate, occupied by John Lysaght at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £9. John Comber records that Mary, sister of Cornelius O'Brien of Birchfield, married John Lysaght of Ballyvorda. see http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/people/cornelius_obrien/genealogy.htm. A house is still located at the site.
Ballyvorheen Occupied by Edmond Bourke in 1814, by T. Holland in 1837 and William F. Holland at the time of Griffith's Valuation who held the property from Thomas Lloyd. The buildings were valued at £25.
Ballyvorneen This house is marked on the first edition Ordnance Survey map at the site of a castle. Described as a "dairyman's house" at the time of Griffith's Valuation and held by William and Thomas Gabbett, younger brothers of Joseph Gabbett of High Park, in fee. The buildings were valued at £15. The house no longer exists.
Ballywalter The seat of the Welstead family valued at £45 in the early 1850s and held in fee. The original house was replaced by an early 19th century building. It was still valued at £45 in 1906 and occupied by S.Q.W. Penrose. It was burnt in May 1921 during the War of Independence and later rebuilt. It is still a family residence.
Ballywalter F. V. Wayland was resident at Ballywalter in 1837. Francis Wayland of Ballywalter was murdered in 1838 on his way to a fair. William Weyland was living at Ballywalter in the mid 19th century, when the house was held from William Cooper and valued at £12.5 shillings. The Waylands and Coopers were related. This 18th century house is still in use as a family residence.
Ballywalter Occupied in the early 1850s by John Doherty, valued at £12 and held from the [Reverend] John Burdett, uncle of Arthur Burdett.
Ballywilliam Joshua Sutton lived at Ballywilliam in 1814. In 1851 the estate of William Parry Sutton, a minor, was offered for sale in the Encumbered Estates Court. It included interest in the lands of Shanrahan. The purchasers included Messers. Carroll, Greaves and Mooney, in trust. At the time of Griffith's Valuation, James King was resident, when the buildings were valued at £9.10 shillings and held from the Irish Land Company.
Ballywilliam Seat of the Maunsell family, Ballywilliam was the residence of T.M. Maunsell in 1837 and of George M. Maunsell at the time of Griffith's Valuation when the buildings were valued at £37. In 1906 the value of the house had increased to £39 and it was occupied by Daniel M. Maunsell. A mantelpiece from Ballywilliam is now in the library at Glin Castle.
Ballywilliam Ballywilliam House was being leased by Benjamin Barter to a member of the Bowen family at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £20. In 1837 Lewis referred to is as the seat of B. Barter. It is still extant.
Ballywire The demesne of this house straddled the border between counties Limerick and Tipperary. In 1826 Fitzgerald refers to the house having been "lately fitted up and furnished in a very tasteful manner". Godfrey Massey was resident at Ballywire in 1814. By 1837 it had become the home of John Bolton Massy who held the property in the 1850s from the Provost and Fellows of Trinity College, Dublin. It was valued at £40. This house is still a residence.
Balteenbrack Rev. Patrick Sheehy was leasing this property from the representatives of Henry Galway at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £10. There is still an extant house at the site.
Baltimore House Jane Freke was leasing this property from Lady Carbery's estate at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £12 10s. Lewis notes Baltimore Castle as the residence of Mrs. Freke in 1837. The building labelled Baltimore House on the 1st and 25-inch edition Ordnance Survey maps is still extant. Baltimore Castle is an older, seventeenth century building which has recently been restored.
Balydooley Lodge John Hanley was leasing this property from St. George Caulfeild at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £5. It is still extant.
Baneena John Ross occupied a house at Baneena North valued at £11.10 shillings in the mid 19th century. He held the property from Abraham Devonsher. This house is not surrounded by a demesne on the first Ordnance Survey map.
Banemore House Robert John Palmer was in possession of this house at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £17 15s. In 1837 Lewis notes it as the seat of R.J. Palmer. Leet records it as the seat of Thomas O'Halloran in 1814. Bary notes that it was in the possession of the Palmer family from the eighteenth to the early twentieth century and was the site of a soup kitchen during the Famine. It is now a ruin. In some sources it is known as Baunmore House. Robert John Palmer of Listowel was the son of John Grove Palmer, attorney and advocate on the island of Bermuda and grandson of John Palmer of Lincoln's Inn and Limerick city (''The Gentleman's Magazine'' Vol 102, Part I, 569).
Bangor or Bingham Lodge Built on the western edge of the town of Bangor by Major Denis Bingham. It was described in the Ordnance Survey Name Books as a newly erected shooting lodge. It is still extant but currently disused.
Banna House Robert E. Stokes was leasing this property from the Earl of Listowel's estate at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £11. Bary writes that it was built by Oliver Stokes in 1815. It was demolished many years ago.
Bannixtown A Clutterbuck home from at least the 1770s, Richard Clutterbuck was resident at Bannixtown in 1814. On the first Ordnance Survey map circa 1838 Bannixtown house is recorded as "in ruins". In 1840, though, the Ordnance Survey Name Books mention Bannixtown as a large farmhouse. The 25-inch map shows a building labelled "Bannixtown House" at the same site. A house valued at £19 was occupied by John Shea at Bannixtown in the early 1850s and held from the representatives of Thomas Clutterbuck. John Shea of Bannixtown owned 254 acres in the 1870s.
Bansha Castle The home of the O'Brien Butlers in the 18th century. In 1786 Wilson refers to Bansha as the seat of Mr.O'Brien. The residence of the O'Ryan family in the first half of the 19th century, occupied by Andrew O'Ryan in 1814 and Edmund O'Ryan in 1837. John Chaytor was resident fromn 1840 and into the early 1850s holding the buildings valued at £25 from Edmund O'Ryan. This property was advertised for sale in the early 1860s. The rental of 1866 describes this residence as containing " Four spacious reception rooms, six well ventilated bed rooms, bath room and servant's dormitory". In the 1870s Major John Lutman of Bansha Castle, who was married to an O'Ryan, owned 485 acres in county Tipperary and 94 acres in county Limerick. Bansha Castle was the home of Sir William Francis Butler in the early 20th century. The Russell family now offer luxury accommodation at Bansha Castle. see http://www.banshacastle.com/index.html
Bansha House Bansha House is marked on the first edition Ordnance Survey Map circa 1840. It was the home of Robert Clarke, fourth son of the Reverend Marshal Clarke, in 1837. John Vincent occupied a house valued at £20 in this townland at the time of Griffith's Valuation. He held it from Richard Butler. The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage dates this house from about 1880. It now functions as a guest house. http://www.tipp.ie/banshahs.htm
Bantis In 1814 Mr Kennedy is recorded as the proprietor of Bantis and Lewis mentions the extensive brewery of Edward Kennedy at Bantis in 1837. The Ordnance Survey Name Books record Bantis as "a neat dwelling house", the residence of Edward Kennedy. Buildings valued at £31+ and 526 acres at Bantis were held from the Honourable O.F.G. Toler by Edward, James, Denis, John and Patrick Kennedy and Henry Fitzgerald at the time of Griffith's Valuation. A house is still extant at the site.
Bantry House Bantry House was held in fee by the Earl of Bantry at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £125. The house history indicates it has been the home of the White family since about 1765 when Richard White purchased what was then Blackrock House. Wilson still refers to it by the latter name in 1786 but it is named Bantry House on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map of the 1830s. The Irish Tourist Association survey of the 1940s contains a detailed description of the house's interior at that time. Bantry House has been open to the public since 1946 and a prestigous music festival is held there each summer. For more information see www.bantryhouse.com.
Barbersfort Originally a Bermingham residence, sold to the Ruttledges in 1816 and recorded as the seat of Mrs. Rutledge in 1894. Burnt down in the 1920s apparently by accident. A new house was built on part of the site which adjoins the old farmyard. Now the home of the Dunlevy family.
Barleyhill In 1786 Wilson noted Barleyhill as the seat of Mr. McManus. Ruane dates the house from about 1748 with alterations in the 1770s and 1790s. He states that the house and 170 acres were occupied by George Harkin at the time of Griffith's Valuation, however the Valuation records Bernard McManus as the occupier of the house valued at £15. Quinn records that Bernard McManus had gone to live at Brownstown in 1856. The Aitken family have lived at Barleyhill for over a hundred years.
Barn The seat of the Moore family in the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. In 1786 Wilson refers to it as the seat of Thomas Moore In 1840 the Ordnance Survey Letter Books note that it had "a garden nursery and ornamental ground". It was held by Stephen Moore in fee in the mid 19th century and valued at £49+. Randal K. Moore was resident in 1906 and Mr and Mrs Murray Moore in the early 1940s when the house contained a very fine library and antique art collection. Barn is still extant.
Barna Barna was the home of the Lee family in the 18th and first half of the 19th century. Leet records G. Lee as resident in 1814 and H. Lee was the proprietor in 1837 and at the time of Griffith's Valuation when the house was valued at £23+. This house no longer exists.
Barna Wilson refers to Barna as the seat of Mr. Lynch in 1786. Nicholas Lynch held this property in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation,when it was valued at £20. It was the seat of Marcus Lynch in 1894 and the family were still resident in the early 20th century. The house is still extant surrounded by an apartment development.
Barnaboy Francis O'Grady was leasing a property at Barnaboy, barony of Frenchpark, valued at £4 15s together with 179 acres of land from William Longfield's estate at the time of Griffith's Valuation. Farm buildings exist at the site now.
Barnabrow This house was the residence of Timothy Lane in 1814. Located on the Thomond estate and occupied by William G. Fitzgerald who held the property from John [Royal] Wilkinson at the time of Griffith's Valuation. The buildings were valued at £28. A lithograph of this house is included in the sale rental of the Thomond estate 1857. The representatives of Edward de l'E. Litton were recorded as the occupants of this house in 1906. The house now functions as a guest house.
Barnane Barnane, at the foot of the Devil's Bit mountain, was the seat of a branch of the Carden family. Occupied by John Carden in 1814 and by R. Carden in 1837. John Carden held the property in fee with 1,430 acres at the time of Griffith's Valuation. Andrew M. Carden was resident at Barnane in 1906 when the buildings were valued at £120. The house is now a ruin.
Barnavihall House At the time of Griffith's Valuation John Connolly was leasing this property, valued at £8, together with over 250 acres, from R.W. Greene. There is still an extant house at the site.
Barnlough This house was a Smithwick family home in the 18th and early part of the 19th centuries, occupied by Thomas Smythwick in 1814 and by P. Smithwick in 1837. Barnlough was held by the Earl of Portarlington in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when the buildings were valued at £11.10 shillings. It is no longer extant.
Barntick A 3 storey house dating back to the 17th century, it was originally a Hickman home. The Hickmans sold the property to the Peacockes in the mid 18th century. In 1786 Wilson refers to it as the seat of Mr. Peacocke. Occupied by Daniel Powel in 1814 the house was later owned by the Roche family of Limerick and leased to the Lyons, who eventually bought the property. Now owned by the Murphy family through marriage with a member of the Lyons family.
Baronne Court The Ordnance Survey Name Books refer to Tinnakilly House and Observatory in the townland of Stonestown, the residence of Robert Robinson in 1840. The property was for sale in the Encumbered Estates' Court in February 1851. The sale details state that it was erected at a cost of £6,000 in 1830. It was altered by the Marshalls and renamed Baronne Court. Reverend Joseph Marshall is recorded as the occupier of the house valued at £53 at the time of Griffith's Valuation. The Reverend Joseph held the property in fee. William K. Marshall was recorded by Slater as the proprietor in 1894. This house is now demolished although the farm buildings still remain.
Barranagh House A house close to the sea on the Mullet peninsular. It was held in fee by John W.O. Richards at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £7. A house and farm buildings are still extant at the site.
Barranastook In 1851 Simon Brien was leasing this property from the Musgrave estate when it was valued at £12. In 1906 Sir Richard Musgrave still held buildings at Barranastook valued at £1 10s.
Barrow House Sir Edward Denny was leasing Barrow House to John Collis at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £20 10s. In 1837 Lewis mentions Barra [sic] as the seat of T. Collis. In the 1830s, the Ordnance Survey Name Books indicate it was the residence of John Collis, having been built about two centuries previously. Leet noted it as the seat of John Collis in 1814. Bary states that the house was built by a William Collis, a Cromwellian officer, and continued to be associated with the Collis family until latter half of the nineteenth century. In the 1990s it was a restaurant and guesthouse but has now reverted to private ownership. It was sold in 2017.
Barry's Lodge Occupied by D. Barry in 1837 and by Henry Barry in the early 1850s. He held the property valued at £28 from Samuel Reeves.
Barryscourt Originally a seat of the Barry family, Earls of Barrymore, it had become a Coppinger home by the mid 18th century. Wilson refers to it as the seat of Mr. Coppinger in 1786 and also notes "the castle of Barry's Court". It was the residence of William Coppinger in 1814 and in the early 1850s, when it was held from Sir William Clarke and valued at £22. Following William's death in 1862 this property passed to his nephew Morgan John O'Connell. Bence Jones records it as a ruin but the original medieval castle has been refurbished and is now open to the public. In the 1940s the Irish Tourist Association survey included a description of both buildings.
Barryshall Barryshall was held in fee by the Smith-Barry estate at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £15. In 1837, Lewis referred to it as the seat of J.Lucas. In 1894 Slater refers to it as the seat of George Lamb. In 1942 the Irish Tourist Association Survey stated that the house had been erected by the Barry family in the mid eighteenth century. Barryshall is still extant.
Bartragh House A Kirkwood family home in the 19th century. At the time of Griffith's Valuation, the property was leased by William Hopper from the Kirkwood estate when the buildings were valued at £16. A house is still extant at the site though in a dilapidated state.
Battlefield McTernan notes that Battlefield was built for the Knott family in the early nineteenth century. At the time of Griffith's Valuation James Knott occupied the property, then valued at £20. Both Leet in 1814 and Lewis in 1837 record Battlefield as a residence of the Knott family. In the later nineteenth century the house passed into the ownership of the Robinson family, descendents of the Knotts. with whom it remained until the 1940s. It was sold and subsequently demolished.
Baunmore Held in fee by Richard Kirwan at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £7. The house was extended and enlarged towards the end of the nineteenth century. It as well as yard buildings, gates and walls still remain.
Baurnahulla House/The Cottage George Robinson was leasing this property from the representatives of Thomas Deasy at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £12 15s. The adjacent mills were valued at £14. A house labelled The Cottage is shown adjacent to the site of Baurnahulla House on the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s. A house still exists at this site. Local sources suggest this was a house lived in by a Fr. Ryan in the 1830s.
Bawnlahan Edward Powell held this property in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £21. Lewis describes it as the residence of Major Powell in 1837. In the 1770s it was the seat of an O'Donovan family. Lt. Col. Henry Powell was the owner in 1906 when it was valued at £21. By 1945 the Irish Tourist Association Survey reported that it was the home of the O'Callaghan family who "had bought it from the Powells". Bawnlahan is still extant and occupied.
Bawnnafinny Described at the time of Griffith's Valuation as a caretaker's house, valued at £12 and held by St John Jefferyes in fee.
Bay View (Bantry) Samuel Daly was leasing this property from the Earl of Bantry's estate in 1852 when it was valued at over £32. It is not named on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey Map but appears as Bay View on the 25-inch map of the 1890s. There is still an extant house at the site.
Bay View (Dungarvan) Richard Hamilton Lowe was leasing this property from the Barron estate at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £28.It was also noted as his seat by Lewis in 1837. It is no longer extant.
Bayly's Farm The home of Lancelot P. Bayly and his family in the 19th century, held from his brother John. The house was valued at £13.6 shillings at the time of Griffith's Valuation. This house with modern additions still functions as a residence. It also offers guest accommodation. See www.baylyfarm.ie. It was offered for sale in 2018.
Bayview (Clashmore) Rev. Michael Purcell was leasing this property from Lord Decies estate in 1851 when it was valued at £12. There is still an extant house at this site.
Bayview House (Bere) William Reid was leasing a property from the Puxley estate at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at almost £10. This may be the house noted on the later edition Ordnance Survey Map as Bayview House. It is still extant and occupied.
Bayview House (Middlethird) At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Rev. Nicholas Cantwell was leasing a property, valued at £18 10s, from Edward O'Neill Power. It is labelled as Boarding School on the 1st edition Ordnance Map but appears as Bayview House on the later 25-inch edition of the 1890s. Rev. Cantwell was parish priest of Tramore and the builder of the Catholic Church there. This house is still extant and occupied.
Beakstown House Major Ledwell was resident at Beakstown in 1837 and the Ordnance Survey Name Books also mention it as his residence in 1840. At the time of Griffith's Valuation one house at Beakstown appears to be in use as an auxiliary poorhouse, held by the Reverend George Peacock from the Court of Chancery and valued at £22+. Another property seems to be labelled Abbey View on the 1st Edition Ordnance Survey map but as Beakstown Cottage on the 25-inch map of the 1890s. The OS Name Books refer to this house as the residence of Mr. Mullvany, proprietor of Beakstown Flour Mills nearby. The name Beakstown Cottage had previously belonged to another property in Beakstown which is still extant [S087559]. The original Beakstown House does not appear to be extant.
Bearforest Named after Richard Beare who held this land in the early 18th century, the house was built in 1807-1808 by Robert Delacour, a partner in the Delacour bank of Mallow. Townsend writes that it was designed by Richard Morrison. Delacour was living in the house in 1814 but had vacated it by 1837. At the time of Griffith's Valuation it was occupied by John Hugh Bainbridge who held it from James Murphy. The buildings were valued at £70. Bence Jones records the Purdon Coote family as later owners. The house was burnt in June 1921 during the War of Independence when it was the residence of Maj. Charles Purdon Coote but was rebuilt.
Bearforest Upper The residence of the Keatings from the late 18th century, Hajba writes that it was occupied in 1845 by Matthew Seward. Griffith's Valuation however records Henry Keating as resident. He held the property from Anthony O'Connor and the buildings were valued at £25.
Beaufield House "Bowfield" House was occupied by E. Howley in the 1830s. On both the 1st and 25-inch editions of the Ordnance Survey maps the house is labelled Beaufield House. No house of more that £1 valuation was recorded in the townland of Carrowcastle at the time of Griffith's Valuation. It is no longer extant.
Beaufort Reverend Edward Day was in possession of the house at Beaufort at the time of Griffith’s Valuation when it was valued at £37. Lewis refers to it as the seat of Frederick W. Mullins in 1837. In 1814 Leet also refers to it as the residence of Reverend F. Mullins. In 1786 Wilson refers to Beaufort as the seat of Hon. Dean Crosbie. Various sources, including Bary, indicate that it was built on the site of a tower house known as Short Castle. . It was sold by the Mullins estate in the mid nineteenth century to the Day family who sold it again in the 1880s. Referred to by Slater in 1894 as the seat of Lt-Col. E. Nash Leahy. It is still extant and occupied.