Landed Estates
NUI Galway

Browse Houses

Search Results: Returned 4893 records. Displaying results 301 – 400

House name Description
Ballinlough Rev. Robert Blundell was leasing a property valued at £16 at Ballinlough, parish of Kiltullagh, from the Sandford estate at the time of Griffith's Valuation. This appear to be the Glebe House. It is now a ruin.
Ballinluig Isaac Seymour was leasing this property to John Smith at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at almost £9. This house is no longer extant.
Ballinode
Ballinorig House At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Colthurst Bateman was leasing this property to Jonathon Walpole when it was valued at £14. The building is not labelled on the Ordnance Survey maps though a more substantial house exists at the site on the later 25-inch edition. Burke records that Colthurst Bateman resided in, and was, High Sheriff of Monmouth, in 1839. Ballinorig House is still extant.
Ballinphellic A house valued at £11.5 shillings in the early 1850s, occupid by Bartholomew F. Barter and held from Sir William Chatterton baronet. W. Barter was the proprietor in 1837. A house is still extant at the site.
Ballinree Ballinree House was valued at £16+ in 1850 and was occupied by the Reverend William Kirwan and held from Smyth Barry. Arthur H.S. Barry was the occupier in 1906.
Ballinrobe Castle A Bourke castle, restored by James Cuffe in 1752 and sold to the War Office in 1821 for use as a military barracks though a barracks existed there in the 18th century as Wilson refers to the town having a barracks with two companies of foot in 1786. The barracks were valued at £75 at the time of Griffith's Valuation. It ceased to be a barracks in the 1920s but substantial ruins of the buildings remain.
Ballinruddery House Ballinruddery was owned by the Knight of Kerry at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £23 10s. This seems to be the house referred to by Wilson in 1786 as Woodford, "the seat of Robert Fitzgerald, with ample demesnes". Leet notes it as the residence of Hon. M. Fitzgerald in 1814. Lewis, in 1837, describes it as "the occasional residence of Maurice Fitzgerald, Knight of Kerry, beautifully situated in a wooded demesne". It is recorded by Slater as the seat of Sir Maurice Fitzgerald in 1894. Bary states that the house was believed to date from the sixteenth century but was destroyed by fire accidentally in the later nineteenth century.
Ballinspittle House James B. Gibbons was leasing this house from Lord Kingsale's estate at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £18. In 1837 Lewis referred to it as the seat of J. Barry Gibbons, JP. There is still a house at the site.
Ballintaggart House At the time of Griffith’s Valuation, Robert Hickson held this property, valued at almost £35. In 1837 Lewis records it as the seat of S. Murray Hickson. Bary states that it was built,c.1830, by Samuel Murray Hickson. It was also associated with the Thompson family, agents to Lord Ventry. The property is still extant and is now a luxury hotel. see www.ballintaggarthouse.com
Ballintava In 1906 Samuel Barret owned the mansion house at Ballintava which was valued at almost £14. The house is extant and appeared to be in the process of renovation in the early 21st century.
Ballintaylor In 1851 Thomas Egan (junior) was leasing this property from the Musgrave estate when it was valued at £11. It was still part of the Musgrave estate in 1906 when it was valued at £9 10s. Leet had noted it as the seat of Maurice Power in 1814. Smith states that it was the seat of the Usher family having formerly been in the possession of the Osborne estate, a house being built here by Sir Richard Osborne in 1619. The property is no longer extant.
Ballintermon House At the time of Griffith’s Valuation, Timothy Moriarty was leasing a property valued at almost £6 from the Earl of Cork’s estate. The Ordnance Survey Name Books of the 1830s mention that the house was built by Timothy Moriarty in 1820. Bary states that this is an ancient house, associated with the Moriarty family for many years. It is still extant. In the same townland Timothy Griffin was leasing Manor Court House [Q602022] from the Moriartys. It is described as "in ruins" on the 1st edition OS map and was valued at £1 15s in 1852.
Ballinterry Hajba writes that this property had passed from the Terrys to the Earls of Barrymore at the beginning of the 18th century. In 1814 it was the residence of the Reverend John Ross and in 1837 of Archdeacon Ryder. The Archdeacon was still resident at the time of Griffith's Valuation when the buildings were valued at £21. It now operates as a luxury guesthouse.
Ballintlea Weir writes that the original house dates from 1696. Ballintlea was occupied by John Kelly in 1837, who is recorded as holding the property in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation. The Kellys appear to have bought Ballintlea from the D'Esterres. The Kelly and Kelly Roche families have resided there ever since. Fitzjames Kelly was in possession in 1906.
Ballintober A house occupied by Cornelius Curtin at the time of Griffith's Valuation and held by him with 132 acres from John C. Heffernan and partners, valued at £12.
Ballintober At the time of Griffith's Valuation, this property was held in fee by Nicholas Handy and valued at £8. The house is no longer extant but it was positioned behind the present house, where the red corrugated roofed building now stands.
Ballintober House Sir John Meade, Knight, was located at Ballintober at the beginning of the 18th century. In 1777 and 1786 it was the seat of Reverend Mr. Meade. Ballintober House was held in fee by Reverend John Meade at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £30. Lewis refers to it as the seat of J. Meade in 1837. In the 1870s it was the property of Reverend Mr. Meade. In the 1940s the Irish Tourist Association Survey stated that it was the property of John Meade whose family had held it since the reign of Elizabeth I. The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage indicates that the original house is now ruinous but there are later buildings at the site.
Ballintogher House In 1786 Ballintogher is referred to by Wilson as the seat of Mr. Strafford. Afterwards it was a Crawford property, occupied in 1814 by John Crawford. George Langford of Ballintogher House was the third son of Richard Coplen Langford who, in 1784, married Catherine Cooper Crawford of Fermoyle. In 1828, George married Maria, daughter of the Reverend Henry Bayly of Bayley's Farm, county Tipperary. In 1840 the Ordnance Survey Name Books refer to the house as "the residence of Attorney Langford". By the time of Griffith's Valuation George Langford held Ballintogher and 236 acres in fee. The house was valued at £20. A building is still located at this site.
Ballintubbrid House Ballintobrid, Middleton, was the home of William Weekes in 1814. By 1837 it was the home of the Heard family and occupied and held by Edward Heard in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation. The house was valued at £13. The original house is not extant.
Ballinturly In 1786 Wilson refers to Ballinturly as the seat of Mr. Mitchell. By the time of Griffith's Valuation, this townland is part of the estate of Sir Charles Coote. John Brennan was leasing a house valued at almost £4 and 180 acres at the time. The buildings are not shown on the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s.
Ballinunty House William Going occupied this house and held it in fee in the mid 19th century when it was valued at £24.10 shillings. In 1894 Slater notes it as the seat of Miss A.J. Going. This house no longer exists.
Ballinvariscal House or Mount Prospect William Massey was leasing this property from TCD Estates at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £5 15s and part of a holding of over 400 acres. In 1814 it was the residence of Roger Lombard. Bary indicates that the house had several different owners in the nineteenth century when it was known as Mount Prospect. It was sold around 1900 and is still extant and occupied.
Ballinvella Hennessy In 1848 John Hennessy was leasing this property from John B. Burroughs when it was valued at £11 11s.
Ballinvilla The home of the Crean family in the 19th century. Ballinvilla was held in fee by Austin F. Crean at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £7. This house no longer exists.
Ballinvilla The home of the Kearney family in the 18th and 19th centuries. It was held in fee by William Kearney at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £10 10s. It is no longer extant.
Ballinvira Ballinvira was occupied by Thomas Fitzgerald in 1814 and by Gerald Browne Fitzgerald in 1837. The residence of William Power in the mid 19th century, held from Henry Fitzgerald and valued at £12.
Ballinvirick The residence of the Royse family, held in fee by Thomas Royse at the time of Griffith's Valuation and valued at £15. Earlier in the 1830s Lewis writes of the great improvements which were in progress at Ballinvirick, Thomas Royse proprietor. In 1906 the house was occupied by Frances and Isabella Royse. Sold by the Royse family in 1919, it became a dowager house for Castle Hewson in the 1920s. The house has had a number of different owners in the 20th centuries and is still a family home. It is open to the public for two months of the year, see www.ballinvirick.ie/
Ballinwear In 1840 the Ordnance Survey Name Books describe Ballinwear as "a good dwelling house...surrounded with plantation and ornamental ground". James Otway is recorded as the occupier of Ballinwear at the time of Griffith's Valuation. At this time the house was valued at £14 and held from the Earl of Norbury. Toler Kingsley Wolfe was the house occupant in 1867. The Ballinwear property had been leased to Caesar George Otway by the Honourable Otway Fortescue Toler in 1859. The house was later altered and a building is still in existence at the site.
Ballinwillin Lewis writes that this house was the occasional residence of the agent to Lord Kingston, reputedly built by Arthur Young who came to Mitchelstown in the 1770s as a land agent. In the mid 19th century Neale Brown was the occupant holding the house valued at £22.15 shillings and 13 acres from the Earl of Kingston. This house is still a well maintained residence.
Ballyallaban Occupied by Michael O'Brien in 1814, J. O'Brien in 1837 and by Michael O'Brien at the time of Griffith's Valuation. The house and over 700 acres was held from Colonel Henry White.
Ballyallia An 18th century house, occupied by Andrew Kerin in 1814. It then became the home of Andrew Stacpoole and was owned by William Stacpoole in fee in the mid 19th century when the buildings, which included a house, steward's house, office and gate lodge, were valued at over £41. By the end of the 19th century the Vere O'Briens were living in the house. The house was considerably altered in the 1970s.
Ballyameen At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Rev. Thomas Goodman was leasing this property, together with over 100 acres, from Lord Ventry's estate. It was valued at £4 52. In 1814, Leet had recorded it as the residence of Rev. John Goodman. This house is no longer extant.
Ballyannan The Brodricks first occupied Ballyannan Castle, a fortified house in the townland of that name, which was in ruins by 1837. In 1786 Wilson refers to Ballyanan"belonging to Lord Viscount Midleton". On the first Ordnance Survey map there is a building named Ballyannan House (W867 715) right on the shore close to the castle and there is a house in the townland of Garryduff named Ballyannan. Ballyannan was occupied by Roger Adams in 1814 and by J. Adams in 1837. At the time of Griffith's Valuation the representatives of Viscount Midleton occupied a house and offices valued at £19 in the townland of Garryduff. The house in the townland of Ballyannan was valued at £9.10 shillings and was occupied by Daniel Twomey and held from the Viscount.
Ballyanny Lewis records J. Maher as resident at Ballyhenny in 1837. James Meagher occupied the house valued at £16 in the mid 19th century and held the property from Thomas Carroll. James Meagher of Ballyanny, Nenagh, owned 370 acres in the 1870s.
Ballyara or Ballyhara The original Ballyara Castle was formerly associated with the O'Hara family. At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Patrick Mullarkey was leasing a building valued at £3 at Ballyara, barony of Leyny, from the Ffolliott estate.
Ballyard The representatives of Peter Foley were leasing a property at Ballyard to Margaret Crosbie at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £30. Lewis records Ballard as the seat of Francis Crosbie in 1837.
Ballyard (Thompson) At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Robert Thompson was leasing a property at Ballyard, to Henry Stokes, when it was valued at £20. Bary records that Henry Stokes was the County Surveyor of Kerry in the mid-nineteenth century and lived in Tralee at that time. He was married to Letitia Bland and they later moved to south Kerry to lands owned by the Bland family.
Ballyard B Geoffrey Eager was leasing a property to Patrick Ryan at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £15.
Ballyard House At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Francis Crosbie was leasing Ballyard House from Reverend Arthur Rowan, when it was valued at £35. The Colthurst Estate sale notice of 1856 notes that Thompson leased the property from Nicholas Colthurst in the 1820s and that A.B. Rowan was an assignee of Thompson. Bary states that this house was possibly re-modelled by Peter Thompson in the late 1820s.
Ballyargadaun In 1906 Charles O'Farrell was the owner of a house valued at £4 at Ballyargadaun, barony of Leitrim, county Galway. This may be the gatelodge at the entrance to the Dalystown demesne or may be buildings associated with the plant nursery in the same townland. {Grid Reference is for gate lodge]
Ballyartney A house built by the Quaker family Barclay in the 18th century and their home in the 18th and 19th centuries. In 1786 Wilson mentions Ballyartney as the seat of Mr. Barclay. The house was occupied by Charlotte Barclay at the time of Griffith's Valuation but she held it from the Court of Chancery. Home of the O'Dea family in the 20th century. Unoccupied in 2009.
Ballybanagher A Nolan family home, now a ruin. It was held in fee by Andrew Nolan at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £12. In 1894 Slater recorded it as the seat of Christopher R. Browne.
Ballybane [Leet records George Gaggin of Ballybawn, Buttevant, county Cork in 1814.] Ballybane was occupied by T. Gaggin in 1837 and by William Gaggin in the early 1850s. The house was valued at £22 and held from Laurence Corban. This house was recently renovated.
Ballybaun At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Lord Clonbrock owned a mill, gate house and other buildings valued at £35 in the townland of Ballybaun, parish of Ahascragh. The gate house is still extant and occupied. Local sources suggest it was at one time used as a school for children in the area.
Ballybaun Wilson refers to Ballybawne as the seat of Mr. Kelly in 1786. Occupied by John Kelly in 1837 and by John Mahon at the time of Griffith's Valuation. The sales rental of 1863 includes a lithograph of Ballybaun, which was described as 4 storeys high. The house was occupied by the Mahon family until 1916 when it was taken over by the Congested Districts' Board. It is no longer extant.
Ballybaun Valued at £12.10 shillings at the time of Griffith's Valuation and occupied by Patrick Cahir senior, who held it from Francis Fitzgerald. It is labelled Ballybaun House on all of the Ordnance Survey maps. A house is still extant at the site.
Ballybeg At the time of Griffith’s Valuation, Michael Galway was leasing a house valued at almost £6 at Ballybeg to Michael Manning. Leet records Mat. Moriarty as the proprietor in 1814. Bary indicates that the house had disappeared by the end of the nineteenth century.
Ballybeg (Mitchelstown) In 1786 Wilson states that "Ballybeg, the seat of Mr. Spratt, was pleasantly situated at the foot of a lofty mountain" outside Mitchelstown. Local history suggests that this was a property acquired by Devereux Spratt in the 17th century. It is not named on the 1st edition Ordnance survey map though buildings are shown at the site.
Ballyboe A house valued at £17+ in the mid 19th century when it was occupied by James O'Donnell and held from Lord Lismore. This house is still a family residence.
Ballyboy The residence of John Travers in 1814, of R. Croker in 1837 and vacant in the early 1850s when it was held by James Fennessy from Viscount Lismore. A house and farm are still extant at the site.
Ballybrada The residence of Joseph William Fennell in 1814 and 1837. In 1840 the Ordnance Survey Name Books describe "Ballybrado House" as "old and plain, the residence of William Pnnyfeather". Thomas Fennell held the house and offices and 206 acres including a Quakers' graveyard from William Pennefather at the time of Griffith's Valuation. The buildings were valued at £21. The original house as marked on the first Ordnance Survey map is not extant now. The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage website features Ballybrada House built 1879, possibly by the Denny family. Charles E. Denny was resident in 1906 when the buildings were valued at £141+.
Ballybricken House Described by Lewis in 1837 as "the elegant mansion and demesne of D.Connor". It was held in fee by him at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £64. The residence of Captain Denis Connor in 1894. In 1943 the Irish Tourist Association Survey mentions it as the residence of J.E. Bird, the walls built in 1820 but the interior having been restored following a fire in 1910. The Survey also notes that it was used as a base by the American navy during the first World War. The site is now covered by industrial premises.
Ballybride James O'Farrell was leasing over 180 acre and a herd's house from Louisa Pelly at Ballybride, barony of Roscommon, at the time of Griffith's Valuation.
Ballybroder In 1814 Ballybroder was the seat of Henry Burke. Ballybroder was recorded as the property of Mr. Burke in the 1830s. In 1855 Patrick Burke was leasing the house at Ballybroder from Peter Dolphin. In 1906 Eleanor M. Burke is recorded as the owner when the house was valued at £10. The house at Ballybroder is still extant and in reasonable repair but unoccupied.
Ballybrood A house in the village of Ballybrood, the residence of a branch of the Maunsell family in the 18th and early 19th centuries. Occupied by Samuel Maunsell at the time of Griffith's Valuation and held by him in fee. The buildings were valued at £11+.
Ballybroony An 18th century house, occupied by Fallon in the late 1770s and in 1786. The residence of the Perkins family from the early 19th century. It was held by Arthur Perkins from the Earl of Arran at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £17. Lived in until the early 21st century and for sale in 2006. Restoration work was underway in 2010.
Ballycahill A house at Ballycahill valued at £11+ was occupied by Mrs Mary Cormack at the time of Griffith's Valuation and held from Doctor Wall.
Ballycannan A house held by James Gloster in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation and valued at £20. This house is marked on the first Ordnance Survey map.
Ballycannan A house valued at £18.10 at the time of Griffith's Valuation and held by John Boyce from George Gloster. No large house marked in this townland at the time of the first Ordnance Survey. Demolished in 1963.
Ballycannon The home of the Spread family in the 18th century, by the time of Griffith's Valuation the buildings were valued at £7 and occupied by Michael and John Daly who held the property from the representatives of William Spread. A building is still extant at this location.
Ballycanvan House In 1848 George Kent was leasing this property from Eliza Bolton when it was valued at over £34. The demesne was included in the sale of Bolton property in June 1857. In 1814 Leet notes it as the seat of Samuel Roberts. The house was in ruins by the end of the twentieth century.
Ballycar Home of the Colpoys family in the 18th and early 19th centuries. Wilson refers to it as the seat of Mr. Colpoys in 1786. It passed by marriage to the O'Callaghan family. The sale rental of 1850 describes Ballycar as a cottage style residence with 'a fine garden attached'. By the time of Griffith's Valuation the house was occupied by Edward Bennett who held the property from the Misses Abbott. At this time it was valued at £18. A house is still extant at the site.
Ballycar (Cove) George Gibsen was leasing a property at Cove from John Purcell Fitzgerald in 1848 when it was valued at £15. This may be the house, built after the 1st Ordnance survey and labelled on the 25-inch map of the 1890s as Ballycar House. The property at the site is now used as offices.
Ballycarron The Butlers are described as "of Ballycarron" from the early 18th century. Ballycarron was the residence of Thomas Butler in the 19th century, held from Michael Gavin in the 1850s when the buildings were valued at £36. ''Burke's Irish Family Records'' states that the proceeds of the sale of the Ballycarron estate and the house itself were bequeathed "to the Church". This building is now divided into residential apartments.
Ballycarroon A house dating from the early 19th century. At the time of Griffith's Valuation it was occupied by Isadore Andrew Lynch, who sub leased it from Henry Charlton. Later occupied by members of the Craven and Connor families. A house still exists at the site.
Ballycarty House At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Charles Blennerhassett was leasing this property to Rev. Edward Nash, when it was valued at £19 5s. Bary states that it was occupied by the Nash family from the late eighteenth century and that it was destroyed in 1922. In 1786 Wilson notes the existence of the ruins of Ballycarty Castle, the property of Mr. Nash.
Ballycaseymore An 18th century house close to the entrance to Shannon Airport, it was the home of the Miller/Riggs Miller family. From 1814 it appears to have been leased to the Canny family, John Canny was in residence then and Matthew Canny at the time of Griffith's Valuation. The property was inherited by Thomas John Ryan of Tyrone House, county Tipperary in the 1880s and was sold in 1913. It is now a craft and design centre.
Ballycasheen House Henry Curtayne was leasing a property in the townland of Ballycasheen from Lord Kenmare’s estate at the time of Griffith’s Valuation, when it was valued at £18. Nearby in the same townland he also held Courteene Hall, which was vacant at the time and was valued at £10 10s. Leet records him as resident at Ballycasheen in 1814. Lewis referred to the residence of the Curtayne family as Courtayne Castle in 1837. The site of Ballycasheen House is now occupied by commercial buildings while The Heights hotel occupies the site of Courteene Hall.
Ballycastle House
Ballycastle House A house which appears to have been built after the publication of the 1st Ordnance Survey. It is labelled Ballycastle House on the 25-inch map of the 1890s. In 1894 Slater records it as the residence of Edmund Alexander Mullins. A house is still extant at the site.
Ballyclery The house at Ballyclery is described as a caretaker's house for the St.George estate. It was valued at £8 in 1855. An occupied house still exists at this site but may have been modernised.
Ballyclogh A house on the Monteagle estate, leased to John Copley for ever. The house was 3 storeys high and had been repaired in 1810 by Copley. His representatives were subletting the house to Patrick Griffin by the time of Griffith's Valuation when the buildings were valued at £32. This house is now a ruin.
Ballyclogh The home of a branch of the Morony family during the 19th century. Occupied by James Todd in the early 1850s who held the property valued at £38 from the Moronys. An occupied house is still located at this site.
Ballyclogh Castle At the time of Griffith's Valuation Thomas Haines and Son owned a house, corn and flour mill and offices in the townland of Ballyclogh valued at £82. This property was held with 4 acres from the representatives of C.P. Coote and John Wrixon. In 1906 Ballyclogh was occupied by the representatives of Charles P. Coote. The house was located adjacent to a medieval tower house. Both the house and mill are now in ruins.
Ballyclogh House The Ordnance Survey Field Name Book refers to the building of this house in 1822 by Henry Rose as a cost of £600. Occupied by P. Cudmore in the 1830s and by Henry Rose at the time of Griffith's Valuation who held the property from the representatives of Samuel Dixon [Dickson]. The buildings were valued at £9+ in the 1850s. Ballyclogh is still extant.
Ballyclogh Lodge Ballyclogh House and Lodge are both marked on the first Ordnance Survey map of county Limerick. At the time of Griffith's Valuation John Russell held land in the townland with associated buildings valued at £12 from Michael Furnell. There were also mills in the townland valued at £35. Valued at £10+ in 1906 when occupied by George Furnell, Ballyclogh remained in the possession of the Furnell family until 1973.
Ballyclogh [Ballyclough] This property was inherited by the Barrys through marriage with a member of the Purdon family. Parts of this house may have dated from the 17th century. Lewis writes of "a handsome mansion in the Elizabethan style". Additions were made in the 19th century. At the time of Griffith's Valuation it was valued at £34 and held by James Barry in fee. The house was burnt in the 1920s. The north wing survived, built 1904. In 1944 the Irish Tourist Association survey noted that Ballyclough was the birthplace of Sir Redmond Barry, "prominent in public life in the state of Victoria, Australia". It was restored and is still a residence.
Ballyclohy Leased from the Disney estate by James Moloney in 1850, when it was valued at £11 10s.
Ballyconnoe House A summer home of the Creagh family, also known as Prospect Lodge. It was valued at £8 at the time of Griffith's Valuation when Cornelius Creagh held the house and townland in fee. Weir writes that an earlier house was in ruins in 1842, see M169 007, townland of Ballyconnoe North. It is no longer extant and a modern house has been built nearby.
Ballyconry House Eyre Stack was in possession of Ballyconry House at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £13. In 1814 Leet noted Ballyconry as the residence of John Stack while Lewis mentions it as the seat of Eyre W. Stack in 1837. Bary writes that it later came into the ownership of the Rice family, became semi-derelict but was then rescued and used a Youth Centre. She notes that it was also known as Ballyloughrane House.
Ballycorban In 1856 Matthew White was leasing a house valued at £10 at Ballycorban, in the parish of Ballynakill, barony of Leitrim, county Galway from the Burke of Marble Hill estate. Ballycorban is still extant and occupied.
Ballycrenode House In 1840 the Ordnance Survey Name Books refer to the site of Ballycrenode House in the parish of Kilkeary, stating "only those people who are very old can recollect seeing any part of this house standing". This original Ballycrenode House belonged to the O'Carroll family and the last inhabitant was a Major O'Carroll. The site is marked on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey Map. At that time and in Griffith's Valuation, the townland belonged to the Toler estate. The 25-inch map of the 1890s shows a later Ballycrenode House, located slightly to the north-west of the original site. This property is still extant, part of a large farm.
Ballycuggaran Weir writes that the present house dates from the late 19th century. An earlier building was in the possession of members of the Church of Ireland episcopacy. Occupied by Marcus Patterson in the mid 19th century and held by him in fee. The buildings were valued at £8. In 1906 Marcus Wyndham Patterson owned Ballycuggaran with 618 acres of untenanted land. [Grid reference is approximate].
Ballycullen House This house was built in 1740 by Carrol Naish on the foundation of Ballycullen Castle according to the Ordnance Survey Name Book. Occupied by Patrick C. Nash in 1814 and by Carroll Nash at the time of Griffith's Valuation, it was held from Henry Hare and valued at £14. It is still extant and was restored during the twentieth century.
Ballycummin Roche Castle was a residence of Sir David Roche at the time of Griffith's Valuation held from the Bishop of Limerick and valued at £30.
Ballycummin A house valued at £8 when occupied by Roderick J. Hanley, who held it from Laurence Murray, at the time of Griffith's Valuation. Described by Lewis in 1837 as the former seat of the Earl of Roscommon and at that time occupied by Lieutenant Rodrick J. Hanly.
Ballycunneen Hogan writes that this house was built in 1805 by Thady, son of Thady O'Halloran the diarist, in front of the old Hickey house. Marked on the first Ordnance Survey map this house was occupied by Stephen O'Halloran who held the property from Colonel George Wyndham. It was valued at £15 and had 159 acre demesne. The house is still extant.
Ballycurkeen The home of James Manderville in the mid 19th century, held from James F. O'Ryan and valued at £19+. Ballycurkeen was still a Mandeville home in the early 1940s when Frank Mandeville was recorded as resident. The Irish Tourist Association surveyor also writes that Ballycurkeen was the residence of John O'Mahony, a Fenian leader in 1848. This house is still a family home.
Ballycurrany House This house was occupied by Joseph Wilson at the time of Griffith's Valuation. He held it from James H. Smith Barry and it was valued at £13. It is no longer extant.
Ballycurrin A house built in 1828 on the shore of Lough Corrib to replace an older one. Wilson refers to the latter as the seat of Henry Lynch in 1786. Held in fee by Charles Lynch at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £18 10s. Slater recorded it as the seat of Charles Lynch in 1894. It was burnt in 1921. In 2007 this house was being renovated and offered for sale.
Ballydangan At the time of Griffith's Valuation James Thorngate was leasing a property valued at £6 at Ballydangan, barony of Moycarn, to James Miller. There is no house marked on 1st edition OS map at this location, though a police barracks is shown nearby. The building is no longer extant.
Ballydavid The residence of Marcus C. Russell in 1814 and of John Russell at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £26.15 shillings and held from Edward H. Byrne. The sale rental of 1854 includes a lithograph of this house. It was bought by Richard Power and his descendants continued to live in the house until 1950. The house was demolished in 1963.
Ballydavid In the mid 19th century Patrick Murphy held a house valued at £10 from Thomas Power in the townland of Ballydavid.
Ballydavid G. Baker was resident at Ballydavid in 1837 and in the early 1850s when the house was valued at £13.10 shillings and held from the Reverend George Cole Baker. In 1786 Wilson refers to Ballydavid as the seat of Mr. Baker. In 1840 the Ordnance Survey Name Books had noted that the house was in bad repair though the demesne was described as "neatly ornamented". This house no longer exists.
Ballydavid House Ballydavid House, Passage East, is given as the address of William Armstrong, JP, in the 1870s. At the time of Griffith's Valuation, this house was held in fee by Francis O'Beirne and valued at over £50. In 1814 Leet refers to Balydavid as the seat of Michael Kennedy. The 1945 ITA survey noted it as the residence of Lady Armstrong but formerly associated with the Armstrong and Paul families. There is still an extant house at the site.
Ballydehob Cottage At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Patience Noble was leasing this property to William J. Swanton, when it was valued at £8 10s. In 1906 it was owned by Robert Swanton and valued at £10 10s.
Ballydine The Mandevilles were situated at Ballydine from the 14th century. Ballydine Castle was sold to the Earl of Clonmell in 1781 and members of the Power family lived there in the first half of the 19th century, William Power in 1814 and James Power in the early 1850s. The Powers and the Mandevilles were related. A lithograph of the house is included in the Power sale rental of 4 November 1853. ''Burke's Irish Family Records'' records Frank Hackett Mandeville (1841-1905) as the last family member to live at Ballydine. He was Member of Parliament for mid Tipperary 1892-1900 and died at Ballydine Castle in 1905. Mary Lyons records the Landy family as resident from 1855-1901.
Ballydivlin House Rev. John Foley was leasing this property from Lionel Fleming at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £10. Lewis recorded it as the seat of Lionel J. Fleming in 1837. Family history sources suggest it was usually given to the second son of the New Court family. Builidngs are still extant at the site.
Ballydonagh Lewis records Ballydonagh as the seat of F. Madden in 1837. At the time of Griffith's Valuation the house was occupied by Francis Madden leasing from the Haughton estate and was valued at almost £4. A second property, labelled Ballydonagh, was occupied by Thomas and John Tierney at the same time.