Landed Estates
NUI Galway

Browse Houses

Search Results: Returned 4893 records. Displaying results 701 – 800

House name Description
Beaumont William Wright was leasing this property from Rev. Thomas Beamish at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £10 10s. Built after the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map opposite the site of a diocesan school. In 1814, however, Leet noted Beaumount as the seat of William Beamish. Mrs. Susan Beamish, of Beaumont, Clonakilty, was the owner of over 1300 acres in county Cork in the 1870s. This house is no longer extant.
Beaver Lodge & Carrigaline Mill Michael Roberts was leasing this property from Michael O'Brien at the time of Griffith's Valuation. It included a mill and was valued at £100. Buildings at this site appear to have been demolished in the first decade of this century.
Bedford House Wilson refers to Bedford as the seat of Colthurst Bateman in 1786. In 1837 Lewis mentions Bedford House as the seat of S.S. Raymond.At the time of Griffith's Valuation, it was being leased by Samuel Raymond to Listowel Board of Guardians as an auxilliary workhouse and was valued at €25. Bary notes that this house was associated with the Bateman family and may have been built for the marriage of Colthurst Bateman in 1775. It is now a ruin.
Beech Abbey Originally a Begg residence, Beech Abbey in the mid 1850s was occupied by William Acheson, who was the main tenant of the Babington lands in the parish of Aughrim. The house was only valued at £2.10 shillings. It appears to have fallen into ruin by the 1890s.
Beech Hill Beech Hill was built in the mid to late 18th century. In 1786 Wilson mentions it as the seat of Mr. Mahon. In 1814 Beech Hill was the residence of Bernard Mahon. It was offered for sale by the Mahons in 1851 and it was owned at the time of Griffith's Valuation by Edward C. Villiers and was valued at £26. In 1906 Beech Hill House was still valued at £26. It is now in ruins.
Beech Park An early 19th century house, the home of Marcus Keane and his family in the 19th century. Griffith's Valuation shows that he held the property from the representatives of Michael Finucane and it was valued at £20. The house was still in the possession of Marcus Keane in 1906. The house is no longer extant.
Beechgrove This house was leased by George Rutledge from Robert Fair at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £10. Beechgrove was noted by Lewis as a residence of the Brannick family in 1837. It is still extant but unoccupied.
Beechlawn House (Kilcloony) John Craig was leasing a house valued at £10 to Geoffrey Prendergast at Pollboy, parish of Kilcloony, at the time of Griffith's Valuation. On the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map the building at this site is labelled schoolhouse. However, a larger building of differing proportions is shown on the later 25-inch Map of the 1890s. The property at this site is named Beechlawn House by the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.
Beechmount Leased by John Cogan from Laurence Waldron at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £5. Beechmount is still extant and occupied.
Beechmount Originally known as Mount Morgell and the home of the Morgell family in the 18th century. The residence of the Lloyd family in the 19th century, held in fee and valued at £32 in the 1850s. Seat of Gen.F.Lloyd in 1894. Recorded as the property of Major Langford in 1944 (ITA). Now a stud and racing stable run by the McNamara family.
Beechmount John Godfrey was the occupant of Beechmount, Fethard, in 1814 but by 1837 T. G. [Thomas Godfrey] Phillips was resident. He held the property from the Massys and in the early 1850s the buildings were valued at £18.12 shillings. The representatives of Samuel Phillips were still resident here in the 1870s. The house is still a residence.
Beechmount Mary Nash was leasing this property to John Hornibrook at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £18. Lewis refers to it as the seat of J.Hornibrook in 1837. Still extant and occupied.
Beechmount Occupied by Dr Godfrey in 1837 and by Thomas Batten who held the property from Henry Lindsey in the early 1850s. A house is still extant at the site.
Beechmount At the time of Griffith's Valuation Sackville Hamilton occupied this house, valued at £22, which he held from James Lysaght, third son of William Lysaght of Fort William and Catherine Royse. James's son, William Lysaght, later lived in this house, which is still occupied. Sold to the Verlings in 1870.
Beechmount (Tramore) In 1850 Henry Lane was leasing this property from the O'Neill-Powers when it was valued at £10. A house still exists at the site.
Beechwood A residence of the Hughes family in the 18th century. The sale rental of 1859 states that Beechwood was for many years the residence of the late Mr Ferrall. Daniel Ferrall of Beechwood was issued with a game licence in 1822. Occupied by Daniel Irwin in the 1850s when the house was valued at £40, by the Tolers in the 1880s and by Clare M. Nolan in 1906. Norton states that the Irwin brothers were nephews of Daniel Ferrall. Beechwood is no longer extant.
Beechwood Park Beechwood, near Nenagh, was occupied by Richard C. Langford in 1814 and Lewis writes that Beechwood was the property of Colonel Toler Osborne but was occupied by D. Falkiner and had once been the residence of the Earl of Norbury. Wilson, writing in 1786, refers to "Beech Wood, the fine seat of Daniel Toler". In the mid 19th century William Osborne was resident, holding the property in fee. The buildings were valued at £33. Occupied by Lady Osborne in 1906 when the buildings were valued at £40+. The home of Philip Blake, genealogist, in the mid 20th century. This mid 18th century house still functions as a country house.
Behamore The Reverend Thomas Hawkshaw was resident here in 1814 and Benjamin Hawkshaw in 1837. The Ordnance Survey Name Books also note it as his residence, describing Behamore as "a commodious house". James Fleetwood was the occupier in the early 1850s holding the property from Lord Dunalley, it was valued at £13+. A building is still located at this site.
Bekan Local knowledge suggests parts of the original house, occupied by John F. Burke in the 1850s, was later incorporated into an existing house in Bekan townland.
Belclare At the time of Griffith's Valuation all of Belclare townland was held by James Pinkerton and John Thompson who had a large milling business there, as well as three houses valued at £26, £13 and £18. The Livingstones must have bought out Pinkerton and Thompson. Belclare Lodge is marked on the OS map of 183. The Livingstone's house is shown on the 25-inch map of the 1890s, labelled Shivdella House, which is still extant. Buildings were demolished at Belclare in the late 20th century to make room for building development.
Belfort Originally a Reeves home, occupied by them in 1837, it became the residence of the Clanchy family in the mid 19th century. John Clanchy was resident at the time of Griffith's Valuation when the house was valued at £21 and held with 37 acres from the representatives of John B. Reeves. The Irish Tourist Association Survey of the 1940s refers to it as the residence of Mrs. Clanchy, widow of J.T. Clanchy and noted that it was much associated with horseracing. Bence Jones records the demolition of this house in 1958.
Belgooly Cottage At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Belgooly Cottage was being leased to William Gash by several lessors including Mrs, Charlotte Harrison, members of the Daunt family and the Earl of Bandon's estate. It was then valued at £9. It is labelled Belgooly Cottage on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map but is not labelled on the 25-inch edition of the 1890s.
Belgrove A house possibly inherited by the Bagwells through marriage with the Harpers. The residence of J. Travers in 1814 and of the Reverend G. Gumbleton in 1837 and in the early 1850s. The Reverend Gumbleton held the property from John Bagwell and it was valued at £36. Bence Jones writes that William Gumbleton, son of the Reverend, lived in this house under 1911. The house was demolished in the mid 20th century and a new building erected.
Belhavel Belhavel was the home of Hugh Lyons Montgomery, built during the Famine. The family took up residence there in 1850. Slater refres to it as the seat of Hugh Lyons Montgomery in 1894. The Irish Tourist Association survey in the 1940s records that "every stone was taken away to build houses throughout the district". An earlier castle also in Belhavel is reputed to have been built by the first Montgomery to settle in the area in the seventeenth century.
Bella At the time of Griffith's Valuation Arthur O'Connor was the lessor of a caretaker's house, valued at £2 10s, as well as 136 acres. Lewis recorded Bella as the residence of E. French in 1837. A ruin is still extant at the site. An entrance gateway named Flynn's Cottage is visible here now!
Bellamont House Archaeological research would appear to indicate that Richard Coote had a fortified house at Collooney sometimes referred to as Bellamont House or Collooney Castle. A later structure in the town, also known as Bellamont House, is not associated with the Coote family. A possible site for Collooney Castle has been identified by Timoney drawing on earlier sources such as Terence O'Rorke.
Bellanagare Castle Bellanagare was the home of the O'Conor family including the well-known historian Charles O'Conor. It is noted by Wilson as his seat in 1786. He later built Hermitage House some distance away and Bellanagare Castle is now in ruins.
Bellavary Charles Goodwin lived in the house in the late 1830s. The Landed Estates' Court rental records that Bellavary House was leased to Standish O'Grady McDermott by William Malley on 10 Feb 1859 for 21 years. It later became a Royal Irish Constabulary barracks and burned down in 1920.
Belle Isle A house overlooking the River Shannon, originally the home of a junior branch of the family it became the property of the 3rd Lord Avonmore through his second marriage to Cecilia O'Keeffe. The seat of 3rd Lord Avonmore in the mid 19th century held by him in fee and valued at £48. Belle Isle was occupied by Thomas Maunsell in 1814 and by Lord Avonmore in 1837. This house is no longer occupied.
Belle Lake House In 1848 William Morris was leasing this property from Shapland C. Morris when it was valued at £24. Also noted by Shaw Mason as a seat of the Morris family
Belle Vue Belle Vue house situated in Belle Vue Park in the townland of Boytonrath was occupied by Andrew Roe in 1814 and by George Roe in 1850. The buildings were valued at £9.15 shillings. The house has been altered over the years and is still the centre of a working farm.
Belleek Castle/Ballina House Edward J Howley held Belleek Castle and demesne on a lease originally granted by James O'Hara 2nd Lord Tyrawley to Vaughan Jones for 999 years, dated 25 Mar 1739. He was residing at Belleek in the 1830s. The Castle was leased to the Pery family in the late 1860s. It is now known as Ballina House.
Belleek Manor/Abbey Built in 1831 in the Gothic style. The seat of Maj.-Gen Saunders Knox-Gore in 1894. It was sold in 1940 to the Beckett family who resold it to Mayo County Council. It became a sanatorium but now functions as the hotel known as Belleek Castle.
Bellefield Bellefield was the residence of George Furnell at the time of Griffith's Valuation. He held it from William Gabbett and it was valued at £33. William's brother Daniel lived at Bellefield at one time. A Charles A. Marrett is recorded as resident at Belfield, Limerick in 1814. Belfield Park is now the location of the Regional Maternity Hospital.
Belleview (Bandon) William Seymour was leasing this property from the Earl of Shannon's estate at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £14. A house still exists at this site.
Belleview Cottage Robert Whiteside was leasing the property at Lisnalurg, known as Belleview Cottage from the Wynne estate, at the time of Griffith's Valuation. It was valued at £8. The site is now occupied by a house known as Ardeevin
Belleview/Bellevue A house located on the Vandeleur estate close to the town of Kilrush, the residence of Captain Jewell in 1814 and of Nicholas S. O'Gorman at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £11. Weir writes that this was a late 18th century house, still extant.
Belleville John Brennan was leasing this property from William Mayberry at the time of Griffith’s Valuation, when it was valued at £14.
Belleville Built in the late 18th and early 19th century. Belleville was held in fee by Thomas Mahon at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £30. The only part of the house remaining is the tower.
Belleville Park (Affane) George B. Power held Belleville Park in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £39. Lewis noted it as the seat of S. Poer in 1837. Wilson, writing in 1786, mentions "Bettytville" as the seat of Pierce Power. The ITA survey states that it was afterwards occupied by members of the Tanner and Wyse families. At the time of the survey, in 1942, it was the home of Richard Keane, It is still extant and occupied.
Bellevue Belview, Nenagh, was the residence of G.W. Biggs in 1814 and in 1837. The Ordnance Survey Name Books note that Thomas Sadlier was the proprietor of Bellevue inn 1840 but that it was the residence of J.W. Biggs and was " a commodious house". Samuel D. Biggs was the occupant at the time of Griffith's Valuation. He held the house valued at £30 with 315 acres from Thomas Sadlier. Samuel D. Biggs was still resident at Belview in the 1870s. Major Biggs lived at Bellevue in the 1940s. Bellevue is still extant.
Bellevue Hajba writes that William Glissan sold this property to Thomas Dennehy of Clashmore, county Waterford. Bellevue was the home of Thomas Denehy in the first half of the 19th century, inhabited by him in 1814 and 1837 and by Daniel O'Neill in the early 1850s who held it from Thomas Denehy. The house was valued at £35. Later the home of the Dunleas, now a ruin.
Bellevue The description in the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage records the building of this house as circa 1820 and that it was the home of the artist Douglas Alexander (1871-1945), one of three brothers who were prominent Quaker merchants in the city of Limerick. At the time of Griffith's Valuation Bellevue valued at £35 was occupied by William Alexander. Another house occupied by James Alexander and valued at £31 stood close by. Both houses were held from the Marquis of Lansdowne. Later this house was the home of the Cleeves family, toffee makers.
Bellevue (Lismore) Paul Shewcraft was leasing this property from the Devonshire estate in 1851 when it was valued at £19 10s.
Bellevue (Passage West) In 1850, Nicholas Parker was leasing this property from the deVesci estate when it was valued at £33 10s. It is shown on the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s in a much enlarged form but was subsequently demolished to make way for the terrace of houses which now occupies the site.
Bellevue/Lisreaghan Belview was the main seat of the Laurence family in east Galway. Wilson, writing in 1786, refers to "Belle-view" as the seat of Mr. Lawrence "with beautiful plantations". In the 1850s it was valued at £42 and was occupied by Walter Laurence jun. In 1906 it was the property of Rev. Charles Lawrence. It is no longer extant but a famous gateway, erected in support of the Volunteers of 1782, is still visible.
Bellew's Grove Slater refers to Bellew's Grove as a seat of Lord Grey de Ruthin in 1894. It was held by Mrs. Bellew at the time of Griffith's Valuation and valued at £30. Buildings still exist at the site.
Bellfield Cottage Bellfield Cottage, valued at £6, was the residence of Michael E. Murphy at the time of Griffith's Valuation. A house is still extant at the site.
Bellgrove The home of the Leonard family in the first half of the 19th century. The Ordnance Survey Name Books refer to Geoffrey Leonard as the proprietor in 1840 but note that the house was not inhabited. It was held by Denis Leonard in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation when the buildings were valued at £25.10 shillings. This house was unoccupied at the time of the 1852 sale. It appears to have been bought by Hyacinth Richard Daly, who advertised it for sale again in 1863. The sale rental states that the dwelling house was in "an unfinished state". Bellgrove no longer exists.
Bellgrove House Described in the Ordnance Survey Name Books as a small house with a demesne of 115 acres. Occupied in 1837 by O. Irwin and the residence of John C. Davis at the time of Griffith's Valuation. Demolished in the mid 20th century.
Bellmount Bellmount, Innishannon was the residence of the Reverend James Crowley in 1814. T. Herrick was the proprietor of Bellmount in 1837 along with a large flour mill. The mill and house were in the possession of Patrick Howard at the time of Griffith's Valuation and held from John E. Herrick. The house was valued at £18 and the mill at £65. The mill building, though now disused, is still extant.
Bellpark Occupied by T. Robinson in 1837. The Ordnance Survey Name Books record Eyre C. Baldwin as the proprietor in 1840. It was occupied by Thomas Goold in the early 1850s. Goold held the house valued at £17+ with 116 acres from Denis Leonard and was the tenant at the time of house of the 1852 sale. A house is still extant at the site.
Bellwood The Reverend Archer was living at Greenwood in 1814. Bellwood is the name given to the house marked in this townland on the first edition Ordnance Survey map. Henry Lysaght was the occupier at the time of Griffith's Valuation holding the house valued at £11+ from Sir John C. Carden. This building is still a residence.
Belmont Bellmont was the residence of Thomas Grady in 1814 and of Captain Stackpoole in 1837. At the time of Griffith's Valuation it was occupied by John White who held it from Thomas William O'Grady. It was valued at £28 at this time. By the 1870s George Sampson was living at Belmount, Castleconnell.
Belmont Reverend Arthur Rowan was leasing Belmont from Arthur Chute at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £40. Lewis records it as the seat of Reverend A.B. Rowan in 1837. The Ordnance Survey Name Books suggest the house was built by his father in 1826 and cost £1500. However, Bary states that the house, in common with other houses in the vicinity, was built by Peter Thompson in the 1820s, when he was Treasurer of County Kerry. It is still extant and occupied.
Belmont At the time of Griffith's Valuation Mary Anne Walsh was leasing a property valued at £17 to Hugh Byrne at Drumsna, barony of Leitrim. In June 1883 Gerald F. Walsh offered for sale the property in Drumsna known as Belmont. Modern housing now occupies the site.
Belmont Home of the Blakes in the late 18th century and first half of the 19th century. Wilson refers to it as the seat of John Blake in 1786. Recorded as a steward's house at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was held by James D. Meldon from the Bishop of Tuam. The original house is now a ruin.
Belmont (Inishannon) James Corker was leasing this property to Frederick Meade at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £16 10s. Lewis refers to it as the seat of Major Meade in 1837. It is still extant and occupied.
Belmont House (Ballynakill) Sir Samuel Roberts was leasing this property from Nicholas M. Power in 1848 when it was valued at £37 6s. In 1837, Lewis noted the property as the seat of J. Roberts.
Belmount House (Kilculiheen) Held in fee by Sir Henry Barron at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £100. Labelled as Belmount House on the first edition Ordnance Survey map but as St. Patrick's Institution on the later 25-inch edition. Institutional buildings still exist at the site.
Belrose A house which, according to the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage, was built c.1860. The land was owned by John Hawkes at the time of Griffith's Valuation. It is still extant and occupied.
Beltra Rectory This house, part of the Irwin estate, was on perpetual lease from the Cooper estate. It principally functioned as the local rectory. At the time of Griffith's Valuation the property was occupied by Rev. St.George Knox and was valued at £13.
Belvidere This house was unoccupied in 1814. Mrs Maria Peard was the occupier in the mid 19th century holding the property from Henry Peard, it was valued at £15.12 shillings. Hajba writes that the Peards sold the estate to the Pope family who occupied the house until the early 20th century.
Belview House Arthur Mahony was leasing a property valued at almost £4 from the Kenmare estate at the time of Griffith’s Valuation. In 1906 it was part of the Kenmare estate and valued at £5 5s. Bary states that this house, very close to the lake shore, was built by James Mahony, of the Dunloe Castle family, in the latter half of the 18th century. In the 1930s, it was still part of the Kenmare estate and Lord Castlerosse supervised the building of Killarney Golf Club here. The original house was demolished to make room for a new clubhouse.
Belview/Bellevue A home of the Yielding family, occupied by Richard M. Yielding in 1814 and 1837 and by Timothy Hartigan who held the property from James Barry at the time of Griffith's Valuation. The buildings were valued at £13 at that time. Bought by the Delmeges in the early 1850s. The original house is not extant.
Belville An Orme home in the first half of the 19th century. Described in 1942 by the Irish Tourist Association surveyor as a large house near the church at Ballyglass, formerly owned by the Orme family and "purchased some years ago by Mr MacDonald, Kilfian. It has remained unoccupied...", due to a popular belief among the local people that the house was haunted. It is no longer extant.
Belville (Iveragh) James Butler was occupying this property at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £9 15s. Both Lewis, in 1837, and Leet, in 1814, record it as the seat of Whitwell Butler. Bary states that it was probably built by Whitwell Butler in the late eighteenth century. In 1906 the property was owned by Arabella Butler and was valued at £8 5s. It continued to be used by the family until the end of the twentieth century but is now unoccupied and in poor repair.
Belville (Kilmacshalgan) According to McTernan, Belville was built by Peter Rutledge on the occasion of his marriage to Catherine Ormsby in 1808. The house was occupied in the 1830s by James Rutledge. At the time of Griffith's Valuation, it was occupied by Margaret Ormsby Ruttledge, leasing from the Cooper estate and was valued at almost £4. By 1876 it was the seat of Robert McMunn who owned 582 acres in county Sligo. It was partly demolished in the twentieth century.
Belvoir Belvoir was an early 19th century house on the same site as an earlier building. It was the home of the Wilson family, valued at £32 in the mid 19th century. The house was burnt in 1888 when leased by the Wilson Lynches to Lady Loftus. It was not rebuilt though recorded as the seat of Maj. Wilson Lynch in 1894. Members of the Wilson Lynch family continued to live in the remaining wing until the mid 20th century. It is now a ruin.
Belvoir (Sligo)
Belvoir (Sligo) Wilson refers to Belvoir, situated on the other side of the Garavogue river from Hazelwood, as the seat of Mr. Ormsby in 1786. By the time of Griffith's Valuation, the property here is held by John Wynne and referred to as "a servant's house", valued at £2 15s. Buildings are still extant at the site.
Benada The Jones had a house here in the eighteenth century as Wilson refers to Banada as the seat of Mr. Jones in 1786. It was held in fee by Rev. Daniel Jones at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £17. In 1858 it was transferred to the Sisters of Charity who ran a girls' school and orphanage there. In the twentieth century it became a secondary school and continued in that role until 2004 when it was sold to a private developer.
Benlevy Lodge A lodge situated close to the shore of Lough Mask and to the Lynch's house at Petersburg. Ocuppied by J. Blake in 1837 and by the Reverend E.G.O'Grady at the time of Griffith's Valuation. The remains of the lodge are still visible.
Benmore In 1778 this was a Daly property and in 1786, Wilson also refers to it as the seat of Mr. Daly. In 1824 Mr. O'Connor was listed as a non-resident proprietor in county Galway. The OS Name Books record the proprietor of Benmore as Hugh O'Connor with a Mr. Dowdall acting as his agent in the 1830s. In 1855 Valentine O'Connor Blake was leasing 584 acres and buildings valued at £8 in the townland of Benmore, parish of Grange, barony of Loughrea, to Denis Deely. The original house does not appear to be extant.
Bennett's Court The Bennetts were resident at Ballymore from the 18th century but this house dates from about the 1840s. At the time of Griffith's Valuation it was the residence of Joseph H. Bennett who held it in fee. The buildings were valued at £41. Owned by a religious order in the 20th century and now in use as a medical clinic.
Bennetts Grove Leased by Francis Bennett to William Beazley at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £13 10s. Lewis refers to it as the seat of Herbert Gillman in 1837. In 1814 it was the seat of Francis Bennett. The original house seems to have been replaced by farm buildings.
Benvoy Mrs. Catherine Power held Benvoy in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £15 5s. In 1814 William Power was resident at Benvoy. There is still a house at this site.
Bermingham/Birmingham House An 18th century house which was originally the seat of the Bermingham family, Barons Athenry and Earl of Louth. Occupied by Richard D'Arcy in 1814 and uninhabited in 1837. It was leased to John Irwin Dennis the following year and bought by him in 1851 from Clifford Trotter. Since then the house has been the home of the related families of Dennis, O'Rorke and Cusack Smith. The house and demesne were advertised for sale early in 2007. The Clonbrock Estate Papers, Collection List 54 in the National Library contain early 19th century rentals of the Bermingham estate.
Berry Hill The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage states that this house dating from circa 1700 was a dower house for the Barrymore family of Castlelyons Castle. By the mid 19th century it was in the possession of the Perrott family and occupied by the Reverend Philip Berry who held the buildings valued at £21 with 15 acres. This house is still occupied.
Berry Hill A house occupied by George Scott at the time of Griffith's Valuation, held from James Morrough and valued at £14. The home of Patrick Ronayne in the 1870s. This house is still a residence.
Berry Lodge A house on the Stacpoole estate, occupied by Francis Woulf in 1814 and by a member of the O'Dwyer family in the mid 19th century. This house is still a residence.
Besborough Occupied by Reverend Theobald Butler in 1837 and still in his possession at the time of Griffith's Valuation. He held the property from Letitia Hickman and it was valued at over £22. By the 1870s this house was the home of Robert William Cary Reeves and it was still in his possession in 1906. Later in the 20th century the house became the home of the Hassett and Sexton families.
Besborough In the 1770s the residence of Allen Esq. The seat of the Pike family for most of the 19th century. Occupied by J. Spence in 1814 and by Ebenezer Pike in 1837 and in the early 1850s. He held the property from the representatives of Bousfield and the house was valued at £78. This house was used as a convent in the 20th century. http://www.askaboutireland.ie/reading-room/history-heritage/big-houses-of-ireland/bessborough-house-and-est/index.xml
Bessborough In 1814 this house was occupied by John Mahon and in 1837 by T. Sadlier junior. The Ordnance Survey Name Books indicate that the proprietor was Mrs. Harding of Dublin and describe Bessborough as " a most beautiful house, occupied by Mr. Cushin, solicitor". By the time of Griffith's Valuation Dr John Armstrong was resident. He held the property from Mrs Harding and the buildings were valued at £20+. Jonathan Harding of Bessborough, Nenagh owned 163 acres in the 1870s. Slater refers to this house as the residence of David E. Young in 1894. It is still in use as a residence.
Betsborough At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Adam Newman was leasing this property to Henry Newman, when it was valued at £19 5s. It is still extant. Family history records for the Sweetnam family indicate that Samuel Sweetnam took over Betsborough while Thomas Sweetnam was agent to the Newman estate. Henry Newman of Betsborough, Skibbereen, owned 877 acres in the 1870s.
Betty Ville House This house is marked on the first edition Ordnance Survey map. Located on the Blakiston estate, it was occupied by John Shaughnessy in the mid 19th century and held from the Messrs Young. It was valued at £5.
Bettyfield Recorded as the seat of Sir John Conroy or O'Mulconry in the Ordnance Survey Field Name Books. Arthur O'Connor was the main tenant in the townland of Shankill at the time of Griffith's Valuation.
Bettyville Occupied by John Lee in 1814 and held by his son William Norris Lee in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation and valued at £11+. Fitzgerald describes Bettyville in the 1820s as a 'handsome thatched cottage' occupied by Captain John Franklin. This house was the home of the Revrend John T.N. Lee and valued at £13 in 1906.
Bettyville The home of the Nason family in the early 19th century, occupied by Richard Nason in 1814 and 1837. By the early 1850s William Corbin was resident holding the house valued at £14.10 shillings from the representatives of Richard Nason. William Corbin was still living at Bettyville in the 1870s. This house is no longer in existence.
Bettyville Charles Bastable lived here in the early years of the 19th century. The house was occupied by John Therry in 1837 and in the mid 19th century, when valued at £11 and held from Anne Westropp. Bettyville was part of the Creagh estate for sale in July 1853 when it was held by the representatives of Thomas Bennett. Very little remains of this house.
Bettyville At the time of Griffith's Valuation, a house at Cloonlahan, barony of Longford, valued at £5 together with over 300 acres was held by Michael McDermott.
Bewley Captain Wiliam Chearnley was leasing this property to Geoffrey Norris at the time of Griffiths Valuation when it was valued at over £9. A farm is still extant at the site.
Bilberry Hill In 1786 Wilson writes that Bilberry Hill was the residence of the late Mr. Drury. It was the home of the Garde family in the nineteenth century, occupied in 1814 by William Garde and in the early 1850s by Winifred Garde. She held the property from Sir A. Brooke and the buildings were valued at £8.15 shilllings. The 25-inch Ordnance Survey map shows a later and larger building labelled Bilberry, which is still extant.
Bilboa Court Built in the last decade of the 17th century by the Reverend Dean Story. It was later occupied by Colonel Wilson. Lewis refers to Bilboa House as the property of the Earl of Stradbroke. It was "nearly in ruins", was built "wholly of brick from Holland" and was formerly the residence of Colonel Wilson. Circa 1840 the Ordnance Survey Name Book records a three-storey ruin with about 40 windows which had been falling into decay since about the 1770s.
Billeragh House Robert Hilliard was leasing this property from Thomas Dennis at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £9 10s. Leet notes it as the residence of Mr. Hilliard in 1814.
Bingarra Occupied by James Clarke in the mid 1850s, leasing from the Bodkin estate and advertised for sale in Nov 1855. Modern buildings exist at the site now.
Bingham Lodge The main residence of this branch of the Bingham family located beside the sea. It is labelled as Bingham Lodge on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map and a much enlarged building is thus labelled on the 25-inch map of the 1890s. It was in the possession of Henry Bingham at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £10 10s. Remains of the walled garden can still be seen at the site.
Bingham's Castle Early 19th century building, abandoned by the Binghams circa 1925. It was held in fee by Anne Bingham at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when the buildings were valued at £20. Almost nothing remains at the site now.
Binghamstown House Built 1796 by Major Denis Bingham and let to Dean Lyons in the 1820s. At the time of Griffith's Valuation, it was valued at £13 15s and occupied by Luke Lyons. It was still owned by a descendant of the Bingham family in the mid 1990s. A house is still extant at the site.
Birch Grove At the time of Griffith's Valuation Thomas Brabazon was leasing a property valued at £10 at Beagh, barony of Moycarn, county Roscommon, to Ellen O'Shaughnessy. In 1837 Lewis records Birch Grove as the residence of J. O'Shaughnessy. Referred to as the residence of J.J. O'Shaughnessy in 1894. A house is still extant at the site.