Landed Estates
NUI Galway

Browse Houses

Search Results: Returned 4893 records. Displaying results 401 – 500

House name Description
Ballydonagh House Described as a steward's house at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was held in fee by Maria Fitzpatrick and valued at £13 9s. Labelled Ballydonagh House on the 25-inch edition of the Ordnance Survey in the 1890s.
Ballydonnellan Castle At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Ballydonnellan Castle was occupied by John D. Mahon and was valued at £62. It was still extant in the 1890s but is described as "in ruins" on the 1933 edition of 6" map. These ruins are still visible.
Ballydonohoe A property held by a junior branch of the Fitzgerald family. The house was the residence of John Church in 1814, Thomas Fitzgerald in 1837 and of St John Thomas Blacker in the early 1850s. It was valued at £13 at that time.
Ballydowny Bary states that "Ballydowney is a very old house, probably built in the early 18th century. It was the house in which Robert Emmet, the patriot hanged in Dublin in 1803, was born. His mother was Elizabeth Mason". The Ordnance Survey Name Books record that the proprietor, St. John Mason, had leased the townland to Richard McGillycuddy in the 1830s. By the time of Griffith’s Valuation, the house was valued at £4 and being leased by Charles Daly from Daniel Cronin. In the early 1940s, the Irish Tourist Association Survey also refers to the possible association with Robert Emmet though it indicates that this story may refer to an earlier house, "replaced by the present one, built about a hundred years ago". In 1942 it was occupied by a Mr. Blanchfield and is still extant.
Ballydrehid In 1786 Wilson refers to Ballydrehid as a seat of Viscount Lismore, "pleasantly situated on rising ground". The home of Robert Keating in 1814 and of Robert Doherty in the early 1850s. Doherty held the property from Viscount Lismore and the house was valued at £17. This house is still extant and occupied.
Ballyduff Ballyduff was the residence of Hunte Esq in the 1770s. In 1814 J. Minchin occupied Ballyduff, Thurles. In the mid 19th century Benjamin White of Ballyduff held the house valued at £11 and 48 acres from John Hunt. The Hunts and Whites were related. Ballyduff , the estate of John Hunt, was advertised for sale in December 1859 and again in November 1860. The house marked on the 25'' OS map is not on the same site as the original house marked on the first edition OS map. Henry O'Neill of Shanballyduff, Thurles, held 155 acres in the 1870s. The will of Henry O'Neill of Annesbrook, county Dublin and Ballyduff, county Tipperary dated 2 Oct 1891 is in the National Archives (T.12,231). Some of his descendants live in Argentina, see http://www.irishgenealogy.com.ar/genealogia/N/ONeill/henry.htm
Ballyduff Castle Farm Described as Ballyduff Castle (in ruins) on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map, these buildings were valued at £11 15s at the time of Griffith's Valuation. They were being leased by Edward Walsh from the Musgrave estate. The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage suggests the house was built c.1825. The ruined fortified house at the site dates from the early seventeenth century.
Ballyduff Glebe Reverend John Bourke was leasing this property from Viscount Doneraile at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £13 10s. It continued to serve as the Rectory for the parish and there is still a house at the site.
Ballyduff House David La Touche was leasing a property valued at £8 to John A. La Touche, at Tomloskan, barony of Carrigallen, at the time of Griffith's Valuation. The house is not marked on the First ed. Ordnance Survey map but does appear on the later 25-inch series. This house is still extant and has been restored.
Ballyduff House (Kilmeadan) In October 1851, the sale notice for Henry Langley's property at Kilmeadan noted that the demesne at Ballyduff was well planted and the house at a little cost could be put into excellent order. The tenant at the time was John Sadlier, MP. At the time of Griffith's Valuation it had been occupied by John William Langley leasing from Henry Langley and was valued at £9. There is still an occupied house at Ballyduff.
Ballyduffbeg James Lynch was leasing this property from the Devonshire estate at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £10.
Ballyduffmore Eleanor Walsh was leasing this property from the O'Dell estate at the time of Griffith's Valuation. Ballyduffmore is still extant and occupied.
Ballydugan In 1786 Wilson refers to Ballydugan as the seat of William Burke. Rev. Michael Burke was the owner of Ballydugan at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £24. In 1906 Michael H. Burke owned the mansion house at Ballydoogan then valued at almost £27. It was burnt in 1922 but rebuilt, with modifications, in 1929. Much of the family and estate archives were destroyed in the fire of 1922. Ballydugan is still extant and occupied.
Ballydulea A house occupied by Edmond Bourke in the mid 19th century, held from Anne Payne, Mrs Cummins and the Reverend Fleming and valued at £14.10 shillings. In 1896 the encumbrances on land at Ballydulea was being finalised. The vendor was the Reverend Joseph King Cummin, see The Irish Law Times and Solicitors' Journal Vol XXX (1896).
Ballydurn Ballydurn was leased by George Moore from the Beresford estate in 1850 when it was valued at £10. An extensive farm exists at this site. [Grid Reference is approximate]
Ballyduvane Edward Herrick was leasing this property from Mrs. Eliza Beecher at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £12 5s. Lewis refers to it as the seat of E, Herrick in 1837. In 1814 Leet noted it as the residence of Thomas Herrick. Referred to by Slater as the seat of M.A.R. Beecher in 1894. There is still a house at the site.
Ballyduvane House Ballyduvane House was held in fee by Mrs. Eliza Beecher at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £25 10s. Lewis refers to it as the seat of M. Becher in 1837. There is still an extant house at the site.
Ballyeagh House Sophia Herranc held this property in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £3 10s and part of a holding of 540 acres. It is described as a Steward's House. This appears to be Ballyeagh House, built after the 1st Ordnance Survey map was published and labelled as such on the later 25-inch map of the 1890s. Now the site of a large farm.
Ballyedekin A house valued at £20 at the time of Griffith's Valuation, occupied by John Leech and held from the representatives of Viscount Midleton. Buildings are still extant at this site.
Ballyedmond Ballyedmond passed through marriage from the Brownes to the Courtenays. Robert Courtney was the proprietor of Ballyedmund in 1814. John Courtenay held Ballyedmond from the Reverend William Halloran in the mid 19th century. The buildings were valued at £199. The seat of Robert Courtney Smith-Barry in 1894. Inherited by the Smith Barrys and sold by them in the 1960s. The house no longer exists but much estate architecture including gate lodges survives.
Ballyegan At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Richard Norris was leasing this property to John Millward (senior), when it was valued at £6. In 1814 Leet noted John Hartnett as resident at Ballyegan. Bary indicates that the Millwards occupied this property until well into the twentieth century though they moved to a different house. The original house was demolished to make way for a quarry.
Ballyeighter In 1814 Ballyeighter was the residence of Anthony Donnellan. Lewis records Balleighter as the seat of P. Donnellan. By 1855 it was being leased by Lord Clonbrock's estate to Martin Coolahan and was valued at £8. The Coolahans continued to own the property until the mid-20th century when it was divided by the Land Commission who also demolished the house. There is no trace of Ballyeighter now.
Ballyellis Ballyellis was occupied by Edmund Barry in 1814 and by Henry Langley at the time of Griffith's Valuation. H. Langley held the property from James Barry and the buildings were valued at £12. It later came into the possession of the Harold Barry family and members of the family were still resident at Ballyellis at the beginning of the 21st century.
Ballyellis A home of a branch of the Norcott family in the 18th century. William Wrixon is given as the proprietor of Ballyellis, Mallow, in 1814. In 1837 Lewis refers to Bally Ellis as "formerly the residence of Lord Ennismore and now of A. G. Creagh". By the time of Griffith's Valuation Kilner Brazier held the property in fee. The buildings were valued at £60. Sold to Mr McCormick circa late 1870s and then to Nigel Baring of Baring's Bank in the 1890s. Baring was Master of the Duhallow Foxhounds for a time and changed the name of the house to Avondhu. Later bought by the De La Salle Order of Brothers. Sold by them in 1974 and demolished.
Ballyenahan A house on the Hyde estate inhabited by the Welsh, Kearney, Spratt, Greene and Barry families in the late 18th and 19th centuries. Wilson, writing in 1786, refers to it as the seat of Mr. Walsh. Eliza Greene was the occupant at the time of Griffith's Valuation when the buildings were valued at £18. The Barrys owned this house until the late 20th century.
Ballyforan In 1786 Wilson refers to a house at Ballyforan, the seat of Mr. Kelly. This may be the unamed property shown on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map, close to the river Suck, which is labelled The Lodge on the subsequent 25-inch edition. At the time of Griffith's Valuation, this property was held from the Greene estate by Thomas Kenny. The house was valued at almost £7 and the nearby mills at £23. It is now a ruin.
Ballyfowloo House At the time of Griffith's Valuation, James Heaney was leasing a holding of 130 acres from Lord Stanley's estate at Ballyfowloo. The 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the later 19th century shows a house in this area labelled Ballyfowloo House.
Ballygaddy Occupied by Kirwan esq in the 1770s and in 1786. It was the residence of Thomas Lally in 1814 and, from the 1830s, of John Daly, who held it from Nesbitt Kirwan. The house was valued at £5 at the time of Griffith's Valuation. The site is now occupied by farmbuildings.
Ballygaggin Occupied by Edmond Murphy at the time of Griffith's Valuation, valued at £30 and held from the Duke of Devonshire.
Ballygagin At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Thomas Garde was leasing this property to John Slattery when it was valued at £15. Earlier, in 1786, Wilson refers to it as the seat of Mr. Giles. There is still an extant house at the site.
Ballygalane House Nicholas P. O'Gorman was leasing an unnamed property valued at £14 from the Devonshire estate in 1851. On the later 25-inch Ordnance Survey Map it is labelled Ballygalane House. Brady notes that Smith had referred to it being owned by the Crotty family. An extant house still exists at the site.
Ballygally House Ballygally House was the property of Nelson T. Foley in 1851 when it was vacant and valued at £27 10s. In 1837 Lewis refers to it as "the occasional residence of G. Holmes Jackson". It is still extant and occupied.
Ballygarran A At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Maurice McCarthy was leasing this property from the Denny estate when it was valued at £9 10s.
Ballygarran House Sir Edward Denny was the lessor of Ballygarran at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when the property, valued at £9 10s, was vacant. In the 1830s, the Ordnance Survey Field Name Books mention Ballygarran House as the residence of William Hilliard by whose family it had been built in the eighteenth century. It is described as " an oblong low thatched house". Bary notes that it was a house frequently associated with the Hilliard and later the Fitzmaurice families. It was demolished in the mid-twentieth century.
Ballygarrett Referred to in 1750 by Smith as the house of John Norcott. Leased by Sir James Cotter at the end of the 18th century to Major Stephen Kell. The Major's son, John, was occupying the house in the early 1850s, when it was valued at £18 and held from Adam Newman. Later the property of the Creaghs. This house no longer exists.
Ballygarvan House Joseph B. Coghlan held this property in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £30. It is still extant.
Ballygeagin House In 1837 Lewis lists Ballygaggen as a residence of the Butler family. Timothy Killeen was renting the house in the townland of Ballygaagin, barony of Kiltartan, from Robert J. Lattey in 1855 when it was valued at £10. Though buildings still exist at the site the original house is not extant.
Ballygeany Marked as Ballygeanymore House on the first Ordnance Survey map. Valued at £15, occupied by John Nason and held from the representatives of Viscount Midleton at the time of Griffith's Valuation. This house is still a residence.
Ballygiblin This was the seat of the Becher baronets in the 19th century. Occupied in 1814 by Beecher Wrixon and in 1837 recorded by Lewis as "recently modernised" [William Morrison]. Sir William W. Beecher held Ballygiblin in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £52. The seat of Sir John Wrixon Becher in 1894 and still occupied by the Bechers in 1906. In 1944 the Irish Tourist Association Survey reported that it was owned by D.CMurphy and J. Lombard. The report contains detailed background to the Beecher family including the story of Lady Beecher, the actress, Elizabeth O'Neill. This house is now a ruin.
Ballygilgan Gate Lodge In 1906 Sir Jocelyn Gore Booth held over 800 acres of untenanted land at Ballygilgan as well as a house valued at almost £9.
Ballygirreen At the time of Griffith's Valuation Ballygirreen was occupied by Francis O'Donohoe who held the property from Lord Inchiquin. The value of the buildings was £12 in the mid 1850s and in 1906. A house is still extant at the site.
Ballyglan Whelan) Edmund Whelan was leasing this property from Lord Carew's estate at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £11. The property is labelled Ballyglan on the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s. A house is extant at the site.
Ballyglan House At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Ballyglan House was leased from Lord Carew's estate by Sir Robert Paul, when it was valued at £46. In 1814 Leet recorded it as the seat of Sir J. Paul. The ITA survey in 1945 noted it as the seat of Sir R. Paul. It is still extant and well-maintained.
Ballyglasheen This house is not marked on the first edition Ordnance Survey map. The Inventory of Irish Architecture dates this house circa 1870. It was occupied in the 1870s by John Barnes. It is still extant and well maintained.
Ballyglass Henry Sampey was leasing a property at Ballyglass, barony of Castlereagh, valued at £15, together with 260 acres from the Ferrall estate. In 1837 Lewis recorded Ballyglass as the seat of R. Kelly.It continued in the possession of the Kelly family who had worked for the Sampey estate. In 1894 recorded as the seat of A.W. Sampey. In 1749 the Census of Elphin recorded it as the residence of Terence McDermott. There is still a house on the site at Ballyglass though it may have been modernised, together with extensive yard and walled garden.
Ballyglass Weir writes that this was originally a McAdam property. Ballyglass was described as a steward's house at the time of Griffith's Valuation and was held by Andrew Caswell in fee. It was valued at £10. Modernised in the Tudor style in the early 20th century the house is still inhabited. It was valued at £25 in 1906 and was then in the possession of Mark Maunsell. Also known as Rosmadda House.
Ballyglass House Ballyglass House was in the possession of the Rev. William Gillmor at the time of the sale of lands in November 1854. There were two substantial houses in Ballyglass townland at the time of Griffith's Valuation in 1856. One, valued at £16, was leased from John Wynne by Rev. Gillmor, while the second was being leased from him by James Duncan. McTernan notes that it was purchased from Gillmor by Peter O'Connor and used by members of that family up until the twentieth century. Slater records it as his seat in 1894. It is still extant and occupied.
Ballyglass House James Mahon, a brother of Ross Mahon of Castlegar, was residing at Balliglass in 1749. The Ordnance Survey Name Books record it as the residence of George Clarke in the 1830s. A herd's house valued at £5 and over 250 acres of the Mahon estate were located at Ballyglass in the parish of Ahascragh at the time of Griffith's Valuation. A house still exists at the site.
Ballyglass House (Clanwilliam) Lewis records Mrs Slattery as resident at Ballyglass in 1837. In 1840 The Ordnance Survey Name Books refer to it as a house "in good repair, the residence of John Burke". It is recorded under both Clonpet and Cordangan parishes. By the mid 19th century it was the home of Thomas Mulcahy. The house was valued at £18.10 shillings and was held from Robert Maxwell. Buildings still exist at this location.
Ballyglass/Ballyclough House At the time of Griffith's Valuation Michael Cagney owned a house in the townland of Kilmagner valued at £24. Ballyglass House is marked on the first Ordnance Survey map in this townland. but the house at this location is named Ballyclough House on the 25-inch Ordnance map of the 1890s. Hajba identifies this house as Ballyclough House, Currabeha. Ballyclough was the residence of E. Creed in 1837. A house still exists at this location.
Ballyglassin House James Butler held this house valued at £17 from his father-in-law, Roger Green Davis, at the time of Griffith's Valuation. There is still an extant house at the site.
Ballyglissane A Reeves home held from the Devonsher family, occupied by F.G. Reeves in 1837 and by Edward Reeves in the early 1850s when the buildings were valued at £30+. Later the home of the Warren family and still a family residence.
Ballyglunin An 18th century house with 19th century additions, occupied by the Blake family for over 2 centuries. It is still extant and run as a conference centre.
Ballygowan
Ballygowan Cottage A Prendergast home in the 19th century, now in an advanced state of disrepair. The property was held in fee by Richard Prendergast at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at almost £10.
Ballygreighen In 1906 Henry E. King owned over 350 acres of untenanted land and buildings valued at £10, at Ballygreighen, barony of Tireragh. At the time of Griffith's Valuation Andrew Finnegan was leasing a property valued at £8 from the King estate at Ballygreighen. The original buildings is no longer extant.
Ballygrenane House At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Samuel Shelwell (or Sewell) was leasing this property from the Earl of Listowel's estate when it was valued at £7 15s.In 1814 Leet noted it as the residence of Mrs. Showel. Lewis mentions Ballygrinnan as the seat of S. Sewell in 1837. Bary states that it later passed to the Macauley family who owned it until the end of the twentieth century.
Ballygrennan Castle Granted to the Evans family under the Acts of Settlement. In the early 19th century the residence of William Creed. Described as "in ruins" on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map. Some portions of the building remains though much of the stone has been removed.
Ballygriffen Taylor and Skinner record the Earl of Clanwilliam as proprietor of Ballygrifffin, Golden, in the 1770s. In 1786 Wilson refers to two properties owned by the Earl in this area "on the left of Golden is Lisheen, a seat sometimes occupied by the Earl of Clanwiliam, contiguous to which is Ballygrifin, where his lordship has a very fine range of stables and other offices". The house now at Ballygriffin is a mid 19th century house incorporating the remains of a a tower house. Occupied by Edmond [Edward] Dalton in the mid 19th century when the buildings were valued at £16.10 shillings and held from Charles Bianconi. Edward Dalton's son John Edward Dalton of Golden Hills owned 161 acres in the 1870s.
Ballygriffin Described by Smith in the mid 18th century as "a pretty seat of Mr David Nagle". This house was the birthplace of Nano Nagle. By 1814 Ballygriffin was occupied by William J. Boyce and in the early 1850s by Ellen Linehan who held the property from J.C. Nagle. The buildings were valued at £6. In 1942 the Irish Tourist Association Survey reported that the building was in ruins but it was restored in the late 20th century and is now known as the Nano Nagle Centre, preserving the heritage of the Presentation Nuns worldwide.
Ballyguiry James Wall was leasing this property from Lord Decies estate in 1851 when it was valued at £11 10s. There are still extant buildings at the site.
Ballygunner Castle In 1848, John Phelan was leasing this property from John P. Fitzgerald, when it was valued at £16 8s. The National Inventory of Architerctural Heritage cites it as a building of national importance due to its combination of a medieval castle site with a seventeenth century house. The building is still extant.
Ballyhalwick House Leased by William Norwood from the Townsend estate in 1851 when it was valued at £13. Noted by Slater as the residence of William Norwood in 1894. The original house is not extant.
Ballyhamlet House James Parker was leasing Ballyhamlet from the Earl of Shannon's estate in 1851 when it was valued at £17. There is still an extant house at the site.
Ballyhannon Weir writes that this is a mid 19th century house and was the home of Thomas Studdert. This house valued at £24 was occupied by his representatives in 1906. It is still extant.
Ballyhar House In 1786 Wilson refers to Ballyhar, the residence of Mr. Eager. John Leahy was in possession of this property at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £17. Bary states that this house was originally built by the Eager family but later sold to the Leahys. It is now a ruin.
Ballyheeragh St Leger This house was held in fee by Dominick Kearns at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £10. Bought by the Tierney family in the early 20th century and still occupied by them.
Ballyheige Castle Pierce Crosbie was in possession of Ballyheige Castle at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £62 10s. Noted by Slater as the seat of Col. James Crosbie in 1894. In 1906 it was owned by James D. Crosbie and valued at £50. The Ordnance Survey Field Name Books describe the house as "a splendid and commodious building in the Gothic style" and record that the house was burned on the night of 14 November 1840. Bary writes that this had originally been the property of the Cantillons, some of whom later intermarried with the Crosbies. The original house on this site was constructed in the mid-eighteenth century but was renovated and enlarged to the design of Richard Morrison in the early nineteenth century. The building was used as a prison at the time of the War of Independence in the early 1920s and was subsequently burnt. Very little of the original remains but some renovation has taken place and there is holiday accommodation at the site, now surrounded by the Golf Course.
Ballyheige Glebe The representatives of Pierce Crosbie were leasing this property to Reverend Thomas Heffernan at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £17 15s. In the 1830s, the Ordnance Survey Name Books describe it as "a good slated house, two stories high", then the residence of Reverend James P. Chute. A house is still extant at the site.
Ballyhennessy Leet refers to Ballyhennessy as the residence of James Supple in 1814.
Ballyhennessy At the time of Griffith's Valuation, George Sandes was leasing this property from Mrs. S.C. Herrane, when it was valued at £5 and included an orchard. By the 1890s the 25-inch edition Ordnance Survey map indicates that the orchard was all but gone and the buildings were also altered. A substantial farm exists at the site now.
Ballyhenry House In 1786 Wilson refers to Ballyhenry as the seat of Mr. Hartnett. No house is named in this townland on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey Map. At the time of Griffith's Valuation the property is held by Michael Duggan leasing from the Hurley estate and the house is valued at £3 10s. Modern farm buildings exist at the site now.
Ballyhoo William Hurley was leasing this property from the Lane-Fox estate in 1848 when it was valued at almost £12. Modern buildings exist at the site now.
Ballyhorgan House (Ratoo) At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Thomas Stoughton was occupying this property which was valued at £33. Lewis refers to it as the seat of T.A. Stoughton in 1837. Bary states that this house was built by the Stoughtons in the seventeenth century and continued to be occupied by them until the twentieth century, though it suffered attacks from the Whiteboys and during the War of Independence. It is now a ruin.
Ballyhorgan South At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Goodman Gentleman was leasing this property from Sophia Herranc, when it was valued at £7. Lewis mentions a house called Ballyhorgan under Finuge Civil Parish as the seat of W. Hilliard in 1837. Leet also notes it as the seat of William R. Hilliard in 1814. In 1906 it was owned by Robert G. Gentleman and valued at £8.
Ballyhorgan West Sophia Herrane was leasing this property to Stephen Sandes at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £10 15s. It is labelled Ballyhorgan West on the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s. Buildings are still extant at the site.
Ballyhoura Lodge Ballyhoura Lodge was occupied by Christopher Crofts at the time of Griffith's Valuation. He held the property from the representatives of Robert Holmes and the buildings were valued at £23. The house is still a family home.
Ballyhowly A Ruttledge family home in the 19th century, there is a lithograph of the house included in the sales advertisement of the Oranmore and Browne estate 1854. At the time of Griffith's Valuation, William Rutledge was leasing the property, valued at £10, from John Nolan Ferrall. Wilson describes it as "a country seat belonging to Henry Browne" in 1786. This house now offers farmhouse accommodation to guests.
Ballyin Flour Mill In 1851, Nelson T. Foley was leasing this property, including a substantial flour mill. from the Devonshire estate when it was valued at £110. The mill building is now derelict.
Ballyin Garden House At the time of Griffith's Valuation, the building at Ballyin Gardens was held in fee by the Devonshire estate and valued at £22. In 2021 it was offered for sale.
Ballyin House In 1851 Ballyin House was leased from the Devonshire estate by Nelson P. Foley when ithe house and flour mill were valued at £110. Lewis refers to it as the residence of P. Foley in 1837. Smith refers to Ballyin as the seat of Richard Musgrave. The house is still extant and occupied.
Ballykeating A house probably built in the mid 19th century, occupied by John Grove Annesley who held the property from his father General Annesley. It was valued at £14 at the time of Griffith's Valuation. Sold to the Callaghans in the mid 1890s. The Callaghans continued to own the property until the late 1970s. A property much associated with horse racing and hunting. Buildings are still extant at the site.
Ballykeel The home of the Lysaght family in the late 18th century. Weir writes that the house was built by George Lysaght who was resident in 1814. Lewis refers to Ballykeale as the seat of the Lysaght family 'now occupied' by Mrs Fitzgerald. The Irish Tourist Association file records that the house became the property of Henry Comerford in 1839. It was unoccupied at the time of Griffith's Valuation and held by Henry Comerford. It passed from him to the Blake Fosters. Francis O'D. Blake Foster was the owner in 1906. Mrs Blake Forster was resident in the 1940s and the Irish Tourist Association file lists the paintings in the house.
Ballykelly House In 1840 the Ordnance Survey Name Books describe Ballykelly House as "a gentleman's seat, so called". At the time of Griffith's Valuation the house and demesne were leased by James Kennedy from Edward Minchin when the buildings were value at £10. There is still an extant house at Ballykelly.
Ballykett Home of a branch of the Hickman family in the 18th century. Weir writes that the Tymons lived here at the end of the 18th century. Occupied by Thomas Pilkington in 1814 and later by the O'Donnell family and then the Brews. No house is named on the first Ordnance Survey map of 1842. George Brew held a house valued at 2 shillings at the time of Griffith's Valuation. The original house was demolished and replaced by a late 19th century house. Also known as Elmgreen, Taylor and Skinner's map 1778 shows two houses beside each other named Elmgreen occupied by Hickman and Ballykett by Monsell.
Ballykilty A McMahon residence in the 1730s, In 1786 Wilson notes it as the seat of Mr. McMahon. Weir writes that the lease of Ballykilty was purchased by John Blood in 1785. Occupied by Robert Young in 1814 and by John Blood in 1837 and at the time of Griffith's Valuation. He held the property from William Monsell. The front of the house was replaced following a fire in the 19th century. Functioned as a hotel in the latter part of the 20th century and now the site of a major hotel development.
Ballykinealy The proprietor of this house in 1837 was Captain Fitzgerald of the Royal Navy. At the time of Griffith's Valuation Michael Fitzgerald held the property from John Fitzgerald and the buildings were valued at £20. The sale rental of 1861 refers to the house as a mansion "a large and first-class residence". It was occupied by Michael Joseph Fitzgerald, a barrister and younger brother of John Fitzgerald. The National Inventory of Architectual Heritage states that this house was a rectory for some time. Lewis writes that it was formerly "a religious establishment".
Ballykinlettragh At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Henry "Faucett" had much of this townland leased from the Binghams of Bingham's Castle, barony of Erris. A building labelled Ballykinletteragh House appears on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map but has disappeared by the publication of the 25-inch edition in the 1890s.
Ballykisteen House Described by Lewis in 1837 as an "elegant modern building" situated on the Limerick road. The Ordnance Survey Name Books of 1840 refer to it as "the residence of Lord Stanley, pleasantly situated on rising ground and in good repair". In the early 1850s the house was valued at £50 and held in fee by Lord Stanley. It was later one of the homes of the O'Connor family. The original house no longer exists. Ballykisteen hotel and golfcourse are now located near the site.
Ballyknock A house valued at £12 10s which was vacant at the time of Griffith's Valuation . Probably in the possession of Thomas Dooley who was leasing property from the Beresford estate in the area. There is no house visible on the later 25-inch map of the 1890s.
Ballyknockane Marked on the first Ordnance Survey map as Ballyknockane Cottage, valued at £21 and occupied by Walter Asper at the time of Griffith's Valuation. He held the property from the Marquess of Ormonde. In 1894 Slater noted it as part of the latter estate. This building no longer exists.
Ballyknockane A house occupied by Thomas Ware in the early 1850s, valued at £11 and held in fee. It is labelled Ballyknockane House on the 25-inch edition of the Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s. It is now a ruin.
Ballyknockane The home of the Scanlan family from at least 1814 when Michael Scanlan was resident. Occupied by William Scanlan at the time of Griffith's Valuation, held by him in fee and valued at £25+. In 1906 William Scanlan held 145 acres of untenanted land and a mansion valued at £22 at Ballyknockane. Residence of Miss Reynolds in 1944.
Ballylahan A property held by Pat McLaughlin from Sir William H Palmer in the early 19th century and by the Atkinsons at the time of Griffith's Valuation. Quinn writes that it was repossessed at the time of the expiration of their lease. It was a ruin by the publication of the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s.
Ballylangy House Occupied by John Sealy at the time of Griffith's Valuation, on lease from the representatives of Thomas Sealy. The house was valued at £16 at the time. I February 1890 Ballylangy was included in the sale of the estate of Dorothea Holmes. The sale notice includes a detailed description of the house at that time. A house still exists at this site.
Ballylanigan (Cramer) [Thomas Pennefather is recorded as resident at Ballylanigan (Pennefather?) in 1814]. Lewis refers to the Cramer family of Ballylanigan. At the time of Griffith's Valuation Ballylanigan (Cramer) was occupied by Thomas Sexton and held from Mrs Catherine Reeves. The buildings were valued at £17+. This house still exists.
Ballyleaan Lodge Lewis records Ballylane Lodge as the residence of W. Coppinger. At the time of Griffith' s Valuation William Coppinger held in fee at Ballyleaan 142 acres, a lodge, offices and gate lodge. The property was later inherited by the O'Connell family and by marriage passed to John Charles Coppinger O'Connell (later Bianconi) in the 1870s. The mansion house valued at £41 was in the possession of John O'Connell in 1894 and in 1906. Weir writes that the house was completely demolished in 1970.
Ballylee Castle Lewis records the Carrig family as residennt at Ballylee Castle in 1837. At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Patrick Carrick was leasing a herd's house, old castle and land from William Gregory at Ballylee, barony of Kiltartan. The property was valued at £5 at the time. In the early century Ballylee Castle was bought and renovated by the poet, W.B. Yeats. After falling into disrepair again it was acquired by the Office of Public Works as a museum to the poet. It was severely damaged by flooding in 2009 and is not currently open to the public.
Ballylemon Lodge In 1906 Kathleen M. Walsh was the owner of this property, then valued at over £13. It had been built in the later nineteenth century and is shown on the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s. Local sources state that it was also the home of John O'Keeffe, MP for Dungarvan in the 1870s. An earlier property in the Ballylemon area was described by Smith in 1774 as "anciently the seat of Sir Richard Osborne".
Ballylicky House Arthur Hutchins was leasing this house from the Earl of Kenmare's estate in 1852 when it was valued at almost £14. In 1837 Lewis refers to it as the seat of S. Hutchins. Later associated with the Hurst and Graves family. Still occupied by a Graves family member.