Landed Estates
NUI Galway

Browse Houses

Search Results: Returned 4893 records. Displaying results 4801 – 4893

House name Description
Wilton Valued at £15 at the time of Griffith's Valuation and held by James Welply from John D. Croker. Later occupied by Bradys, Westropps and Webbs, still extant.
Windfield Originally a Blake house, Wilson refers to it as the seat of Mr. Blake in 1786. It was sold to the Jameson family in the early 1820s and occupied by J. Lynch in the late 1830s. Catherine Lynch was leasing the property at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £30. The house was burnt in 1921 and nothing remains now.
Windford A home of the Hudson family occupied by John Hudson in 1814 and by Robert Hudson in the early 1850s. Though there are buildings at the site the original house does not seem to be extant.
Windsor Cottage At the time of Griffith's Valuation Thomas Martin was leasing a house valued at over £4 from Frances Ramsey in this area of Killahora townland. The property subsequently built on the site is labelled Windsor Cottage on the later 25-inch Ordnance Survey map. It is still extant and occupied.
Windsor House Dominick Sarsfield was living at Windsor, Cork, in 1814 and by 1837 it was the property of J. Martin. Joseph Martin held this house valued at £13.10 shillings from the Earl of Bandon in the early 1850s. Windsor House is still extant and occupied.
Windsor House In 1786 Wilson referss to Breandrum as the seat of Mr. McDonnell. A house valued at £40 was held by Colonel James McAlpine at Breandrum or Windsor at the time of Griffith's Valuation. The original house has been replaced by a modern building.
Wingfield A house located just inside the county Tipperary border with county Offaly. The property belonged to John Shortt in the mid 18th century. When he died in 1768 his widow Frances (nee Spunner) married Jonathan Doolan. Wingfield was occupied by Jonathan's son Thomas Doolan in 1814 and in 1837. The Ordnance Survey Name Books refer to it as the residence of [Paliner?] Thomas Doolan in 1840. By the time of Griffith's Valuation Henry Spunner was resident. He held the property from Jonathan Short and the buildings were valued at £20. Richard Thomas Croasdaile and his sister Margaret occupied the house in 1901. This house is now a ruin.
Winterfield House Described in the 1830s as a neat 2 storied house, the home of Captain Butler. It was held in fee by John Butler at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £15. It is no longer extant.
Woburn A "gentleman's seat" called Waburn is recorded here in the Ordnance Survey Name Books of the 1830s. Slater refers to Woburn as the seat of Henry Flanagan in 1846. Buildings in this townland valued at £15 were leased by Henry Flanagan from the Clanricarde estate in 1856. Woburn is still extant though disused.
Wood Hill/Knocknacurra House Benjamin Gillman was leasing this property to William McCrate at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £14 5s. Lewis refers to the house as Knocknacurra, seat of Benjamin Gillman in 1837. It is labelled Knocknacurra House on the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s. Farm builidngs appear to occupy the site now.
Wood House (Woodville) Thomas McGrath was leasing a house and mill from William Christmas at the time of Griffith's Valuation when the two properties had a valuation of £23. This house is labelled Woodvilla on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey Map but Wood House on the later 25-inch edition. A house is still extant at the site. The mill buildings are described as "in ruins" on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map.
Wood Park This was the earlier house on this estate, shown as Woodpark on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map of 1838. It was lived in by the Anderson family in the 1830s and 1840s. At the time of Griffith's Valuation it was held in fee by Thomas Jones and valued at £6. A house diminished in size but still labelled Wood Park is shown on the 25-inch map of the 1890s. This property does not appear to be extant now. [Charles Coyne also lived at Massbrook in the mid 19th century. See also under Massbrook]
Wood View A house valued at £10+ in the mid 19th century, occupied by Denis McCartie who held it from John McCarthy. The residence of J. McCartie in 1837. In the Irish Tourist Association Survey of the 1940s it is referred to as the residence of Mr. Daly and "formerly the home of the McCarthy-O'Leary family, connected with Daniel O'Connell". The original house is no longer extant.
Wood View The home of J. Cremen in 1837 and Jeremiah Crimmin in the early 1850s, when the house was valued at £16 and held from Thomas Wyse.
Wood View John Limerick was leasing this property to Robert Hungerford at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £8. The building is labelled Woodview dispensary on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map and as Woodview on the 25-inch edition of the 1890s. There is a modern or renovated building at the site.
Wood View [Carrigaline] George Daunt was leasing this property to William Daunt at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £7. A house is still extant at the site.
Woodberry House In the possession of Richard Bermingham in the mid 18th century, when he sold it to Philip Parker of Erris, county Mayo and his wife, Maria Kelly. It appears to have remained in Parker ownership until purchased by the Holton family in the 1850s. Now owned by Louis Walsh.
Woodberry House (Kilconnell) William Hemsworth was occupying this property, valued at £10, at the time of Griffith's Valuation when he was leasing it from Seymour Harrison. In 1894 Slater states that it was in the possession of Patrick J. Davy and he is also listed as the owner in 1906. . Earlier, in 1814, Leet noted it as the seat of Peter Daly. It is still extant and occupied.
Woodbine A house belonging to the Gores, Earls of Arran, which was the residence of the Ham family until the 1860s, one of whom built the Upper Bridge over the River Moy in Ballina. The Hams subleased from the Jones family. The house was bought by Anne Elizabeth Jones in the early 1870s in trust for her son Henry Hastings Jones. The Jones family sold Woodbine to an American lady in 1939. It was offered for sale again in recent years.
Woodbine Cottage Also known as Admirals Cottage, this house was a summer residence of the Russell family located on the Morony estate. Passed to the Browning family through marriage with the Russells. The house is no longer extant.
Woodbine Hill George Roche held this property from the Smyth estate in 1851 when it was valued at over £26. Local sources suggest it was built by him earlier in the nineteenth century. It is still extant and occupied.
Woodbrook Originally a Netterville home, Woodbrook was located in the demesne of Netterville Lodge and is marked on the first Ordnance Survey map of 1838. At the time of Griffith's Valuation it was described as a steward's house valued at £5. It is now a ruin.
Woodbrook At the time of Griffith's Valuation James Kirkwood held a herd's house valued at £4 at Woodbrook, barony of Boyle together with 340 acres. This property is no longer extant.
Woodbrook House Keenehan and others state that Woodbrook House was built around 1780 by the Phibbs family although there may have been an earlier house on the site. The Kirkwood family purchased the property sometime in the early nineteenth century. At the time of Griffith's Valuation Sarah Mary Kirkwood was leasing a house at Usna, barony of Boyle, valued at £14, from Robert H. Brewster French. From the 1890s-1911 Woodbrook was a very successful racing stables run by Colonel Tom Kirkwood. Life in the house in the post-WWI era has been made famous by the memoir ''Woodbrook'' written by the Scottish author David Thomson, a tutor to the daughters of the family. In 1946 over 50 acres of the estate was sold to the local golf club while the Land Commission subsequently divided the remainder. Woodbrook House is still extant.
Woodbrook House & Darkwood Mill Herbert Gillman was leasing a property at Cloontiquirk from the Cox estate in 1851 when it was valued at £25 10s and included a mill (W224535). The house is labelled Woodbrook on both the 1st-edition and 25-inch Ordnance Survey maps and is still extant and occupied. In 1943 the Irish Tourist Association Survey stated that it was the residence of Robert Atkins and had formerly been used as a convent by the Sisters of Charity.
Woodcliff Occupied by A.E. Taylor in 1837. Woodcliffe, the estate of Anselm Evans Taylor, was advertised for sale in 1852. The sale notice describes Woodcliffe as" beautifully situated, commanding a view of the Shannon". Held by Richard E. Taylor in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation and advertised for sale again in January 1873 and in July 1884. Sold in 1888 and home of the Fitzgerald family at the end of the 20th century.
Woodfield Built c 1720s by the Bridgeman family and sold by them to the Reverend M. Locke in 1780. Wilson records it as his seat in 1786. The house was bought by William James O'Brien in 1802. He died in 1822 and the house was occupied by C. Walker in 1837. By the mid 19th century Thomas W. Butterfield was leasing it from the Reverend Savage Hall who had married Anne O'Brien. The buildings were valued at £22. It remained in the possession of the Hall family until at least the late 19th century, it was leased to the Bourke family. This house was advertised for sale in spring 2019.
Woodfield Home of a branch of the Kirwan family in the 18th and early 19th centuries. By the time of Griffith's Valuation, the townland was owned by the Hancock family but no house had a substantial valuation. A house still exists at the site.
Woodfield At the time of Griffith's Valuation Francis R. O'Grady held the townland of Woodfield, which included an unoccupied house valued at £5. The house is labelled Woodfield House on both the 1st and 25-inch Ordnance Survey maps. Modern buildings exist at the site now though the ruins of some estate architecture is still visible.
Woodfield House (Donanaghta) At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Timothy Egan was leasing a property valued at £7 from the Clanricarde estate. On the 25-inch map of the 1890s the house in this townland is labelled Woodfield. It is still extant and occupied. The first edition Ordnance Survey map notes an old brewery nearby.
Woodford John Murphy lived at Woodford in 1814 and Edmund Murphy in the mid 19th century when the house was valued at £30.15 shillings and held from Francis Greene. The Ordnance Survey Name Books describe it as "a gentleman's seat situated in a small demesne" in 1841. It is still extant.
Woodford Woodford was the residence of Robert J. Gore at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £15. In 1814 it was occupied by John Gore. Both Taylor and Skinner and Wilson also record it as a seat of the Gore family in the 1780s. The house at Woodford Demesne, described as "formerly the residence of the Rev. Gore" was "formerly a genteel residence but now in a ruinous state" at the time of the first Ordnance Survey in 1835. Lewis records it as the seat of Ormsby Gore in 1837. In 1906 it was the property of Emily Upperton and was valued at £19. The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage states that it retains little original fabric but much of the estate architecture, including the site of the walled garden survives. There is also an earlier castle at this site.
Woodford House At the time of Griffith’s Valuation, Mary Curtayne was leasing this property at Lissyviggeen from Lord Kenmare’s estate, when it was valued at £13 5s. Bary states that it was occupied by the Misses Curtayne in the 19th century and is still extant and occupied.
Woodfort Described in 1750 as "an handsome house, with elegant plantations" inhabited by Simeon Marshal, Surveyor General of Munster. Occupied by Ousley esq in the 1770s and 1780s, this house was the home of Richard Perry in 1814 and of T. Ware in 1837. It was valued at £30 at the time of Griffith's Valuation and still held by Thomas Weir from Charles Haynes. Later the home of the Carroll-Leahy family. In 1944 the Irish Tourist Association survey reported that it was a novitiate for the Sisters of St. Francis. This house now functions as Mount Alvernia Hospital.
Woodfort George Massy occupied this house, which he held from the Reverend Samuel Adams, in the early 1850s. It was valued at £20. The home of the Magniers at the beginning of the 21st century.
Woodfort (Bandon) John Ottley was leasing Woodford from the Alcock family in 1851 when it was valued at £25. It is still extant.
Woodhill Originally this property belonged to the Dennis family. Following the marriage of Elizabeth Dennis to Cooper Penrose, a Quaker, of Waterford, it passed into the possession of the Penrose family, who enlarged the house. Another Cooper Penrose was the occupant in 1814 and in the mid 19th century holding the property from James Murphy. The buildings were valued at £100. The house was demolished circa 1980s.
Woodhill House At the time of Griffith's Valuation Lewis Jones was leasing Woodhill house, valued at £25, at Knockaculleen, barony of Tireragh, from Anne Jones. When the property was offered for sale in the Landed Estates Court in May 1875 the house is described as " a handsome modern residence valued at £30". The Wingfield King estate sold their interest in the property in 1879 and the sale notice mentions Thaddeus Tiernan as occupying the house at that time. In 1906 a house here valued at £20 was the property of Thaddeus Tiernan. McTernan states that this gentleman had amassed a fortune in Australia and South America. He became involved in public life, including Board of Guardians and County Council, on taking up residence at Woodhill. The house is still owned by his descendents.
Woodhouse (Middlethird) In 1841 the Ordnance Survey Name Books refer to Woodhouse, a gentleman's house, the proprietor being Basil Bryan. By the time of Griffith's Valuation, a property at Woodhouse was occupied by Timothy Connolly, who was leasing it from Richard Price. It was valued at £10+. Woodhouse is labelled "in ruins" on the 25-inch edition Ordnance Survey Map of the 1890s.
Woodhouse (Stradbally) Robert Uniacke held this property in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £52 10s. In 1894 Slater refers to it as the seat of Robert H. Beresford. In 1906 it was the property of John Beresford and still valued at over £52. Smith referred to it in 1774 as the estate of Borr Uniake. Peacock notes that the Woodhouse estate was successively owned by Fitzgeralds (up to 1724), the Uniackes (until 1855) and after that the Beresfords. In 1942, the ITA survey notes that the owner of the house, Major Lord William Beresford was then resident in India. The house is still extant and well-maintained. It was sold in 2013.
Woodinstown Woodinstown was the home of a branch of the Carew family in the 18th and 19th centuries. Robert Carew was resident in the first half of the 19th century, holding the property in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation when the buildings were valued at £16. This house is no longer extant.
Woodland House At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Michael Dobbyn was leasing Woodland House from Elizabeth Bolton, when it was valued at £22. The house thus labelled on the 1st-edition Ordnance Survey map was located a short distance away at S661113 but seems to have been superceded by this house by 1848. The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage notes that this house was sometimes used as a Dower house for Faithlegg House. In 1945 the ITA survey indicates it was the residence of Hubert Gallway.
Woodlands The residence of J. Tuthill in 1837. This house situated on the Dwyer estate was occupied by Captain John S. Rich who appears to have let the house to lodgers at the time of Griffith's Valuation. The house was valued at £35. In 1942 the Irish Tourist Associaton surveyor records this house as the home of M.D.Shaw "of bacon fame". It still contained a good library and some very valuable paintings and drawings. The Limerick City Museum holds an undated catalogue of the sale of furniture etc from this house belonging to Malcolm D. Shaw 13 Dec [1940s?].
Woodlands (Dunmanway) A house built after the publication of the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map in 1840. Leased by William Wright from the Cox estate in 1851 when it was valued at £8+. It is labelled Woodlands on the 25-inch map of the 1890s. A house still exists at the site.
Woodlands or Aghana Robert Leslie was leasing this property to Pierce Leslie at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £8 15s. Lewis records it as the seat of Pierce Leslie in 1837. Bary notes that Robert Leslie was reared by Pierce Leslie, the owner of this property, when he succeeded his father at a young age. The house seems to have been known at times as Aghana House and is still extant and occupied
Woodlawn A house on the Devon estate occupied by George Bolster, medical doctor, at the time of Griffith's Valuation and valued at £11+. Woodlawn was the residence of R. Cart in 1837. It is still extant.
Woodlawn Wilson mentions Woodlawn as "a very superb ediface", the seat of Frederick Trench, in 1786. In 1837 Lewis recorded Woodlawn as the seat of J. Trench and mentions the extraordinary mausoleum nearby. At the time of Griffith's Valuation, the house and buildings at Woodlawn were valued at £125, one of the highest buildings valuations in county Galway at that time. In 1894 Slater refers to Woodlawn House as the seat of John Samuel Barrett. By 1906 it had a value of £150 and was in the possession of Lord Ashtown. Woodlawn House is still extant but unoccupied.
Woodlawn (Killarney) Francis Bland was leasing Woodlawn House from William Fagan, of Cork, at the time of Griffith’s Valuation, when it was valued at £30. Lewis notes it as the seat of Hon. W. Browne in 1837. Bary states that it was built by William Browne around 1800 but was later lived in by Mahonys, Blands and in the latter part of the 19th century by the Godfrey family. It is no longer extant and the area is now a housing estate.
Woodlawn Hotel At the time of Griffith's Valuation, Lord Ashtown was leasing a hotel property valued at £13 in the townland of Carrowmore, barony of Kilconnell, to William Menziey.
Woodlawn House Situated on the Hickman estate, this house valued at over £13 was unoccupied at the time of Griffith's Valuation and the lease held by Denis Culligan. Joseph Studdert had occupied the house in 1837. He was a grandson of Maurice Studdert of Elm Hill, county Limerick. One of Joseph's sons married Mary Gore of Tyredagh Castle and the Gore Hickmans appear to have occupied the house in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This house is now a ruin.
Woodloch House (Portlaw) A house built for the Malcolmson family after Griffith's Valuation, this house is labelled 'Woodlock House' on the 25-inch and subsequent Ordnance Survey maps. However, family sources note that the spelling "Woodloch" was in use. The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage indicates that it was designed by John Skipton Mulvany. In the twentieth century it became a convent. It is still extant and occupied.
Woodmount A home of a branch of the Lysaght family in the late eighteenth and into the nineteenth century. In 1786 Wilson refers to it as the seat of Mr. Lysaght. Christopher Lysaght occupied the house in 1814 and G. F. Lysaght in 1837. By the time of Griffith's Valuation a Christopher Lysaght was residing there and he held the property valued at £6 from George Lysaght. In the early 20th century Woodmount was the home of the Nagle family.
Woodmount The Reverend P.K. Egan in his book on Ballinasloe records the building of this house by Laughlen Kelly in 1783. At the time of Griffith's Valuation, John Kelly was leasing a property at Tonalig, barony of Moycarn, valued at £13, to James Delahunty. Both Lewis and Leet record this property as the residence of Hugh Kelly in 1837 and 1814 respectively. . Fr. Egan records that the Kellys sold the property around 1880 and emigrated to Australia. The property was in the possession of William and John Hynes in 1906. It is now in ruins.
Woodmount House (Loughrea) The 1st edition OS map indicates Woodmount House at Knockadikeen, barony of Loughrea. At the time of Griffith's Valuation James Smyth was leasing this townland from the Clanricarde estate. The property included a herds' and labourers' houses valued at £2.
Woodpark Described in the sale rental of 1879 as "a good house, with stables, a walled garden, walled orchard and a park around the house which stands on an elevated site affording a fine view of lake scenery". Peter Newell was occupying the house, then valued at £4, at the time of Griffith's Valuation. It is now a ruin.
Woodpark Built in 1821 by Councellor Devite for a cost of £300, this 2 storey house was occupied by Thaddeus McDonnell and held from Patrick Carey junior in the early 1850s, when it was valued at £21. In May 1865 the house and demesne of Woodpark, a 3 storied house with 5 bedrooms, the estate of Robert Keays was advertised for sale on 57 acres.
Woodpark Weir records the marriage of Michael Dalton and Mary Anne Fitzgerald of Castlekeale in 1761. Woodpark was the residence of M. D'Alton in 1837 and of John Kennedy in the mid 1850s. The house was in ruins in the early 20th century.
Woodpark This property belonged to the Wrixon family in the 18th century. In 1814 it was occupied by T. Callaghan. In the mid 19th century James Carmichael was in residence. He held it from the representatives of Charles D. Purcell. The buildings were valued at £11.10 shillings. Hajba writes that the Carmichaels later purchased the property from the Purcells. It is still an occupied residence.
Woodpark (Cloghprior) In 1841 the Ordnance Survey Name books refer to Woodpark as "a new house, the occasional residence of George Waller". At the time of Griffith's Valuation, it was held in fee by William Waller and valued at £7. Woodpark is now a ruin.
Woodpark (Woodpark Lodge) Phillip Read was occupying Woodpark, parish of Inishcaltra, valued at £28, at the time of Griffiths Valuation. It was also recorded as his seat by Lewis in 1837. The OS Name Books record the existence of Woodpark House in Woodpark townland, "the residence of counsellor Reid". The house later passed by marriage to the Hibbert family. In 1894 Slater refers to it as the seat of Robert Fiennes Hibbert. In 1906 the house was valued at £69, the property of Flora J. Hibbert. It was destroyed by fire in June 1921. The site of this house is now located in county Clare.
Woodquay Lodge At the time of Griffith's Valuation James Joyner was leasing this property from the O'Conor Donelan estate when it was valued at £3. It is labelled as Woodquay Lodge on both the 1st and 25-inch edition Ordnance Survey Maps. Modern buildings occupy the site now.
Woodrooff The seat of the Perry family in the 18th and 19th centuries, Samuel Perry was resident in 1814 and William Perry in 1837 and at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when the buildings were valued at £66+. Samuel Perry was resident in 1906. Bence Jones writes that this house is now mostly demolished.
Woodsdown This house was the home of the Gough family in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. It was occupied by Matthew O'Brien in 1814. The Ordnance Survey Field Name Book states that this house was built by the ancestors of Major Gough and "it is now in ruins". It is marked as "in ruins" on the first Ordnance Survey map. Another house was later built by the Bannatynes and occupied by the Goodbody family in the early 20th century. Now run by the Sisters of Charity as St Vincents Centre for persons with intellectual disabilities.
Woodside Wilson refers to Wood-side as the seat of Mr. Carleton in 1786. It was occupied by John Carleton in 1814 and by the Reverend E.M. Carleton in 1837. By the early 1850s the house was occupied by Horace Townsend and held by him in fee. It was valued at £40. It had become known as Kilcrenagh by the publication of the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map in the 1890s. Donnelly states that it was burnt in May 1921 during the War of Independence when it was the residence of the family of Ebenezer Pike. The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage notes that it is now in ruins.
Woodstock There is no substanial house marked on the first Ordnance Survey map for the townland of Woodstock.
Woodstock In 1786 Wilson refers to Woodstock as the seat of R. Shaw. The home of Stephen Blake in 1814, it later became the home of the Comyn family. The house was burnt down in June 1877 and never rebuilt. The family mainly resided in France afterwards.
Woodstock House A 19th century house beside the golf course at Ennis, this house belonged to the Cullinan family at the time of Griffith's Valuation. A house and leisure centre have been constructed on the demesne lands.
Woodstock House (County Waterford) John Hackett was leasing this property to Thomas Walsh in 1851 when it was valued at £21. It was included in the sale notice for the Walsh estate in May 1851 where it is noted that "a sum of over £2000 was expended in building the mansion". The house appears to have also been known as Whitechurch House. In 1894 Slater refers to it as the seat of Lt-Col. Charles Hely. The ruin of the original house was still visible until this century but a modern building occupies the site now.
Woodstown (Waterford) In 1848 Woodstown House was held in fee by Lord Carew when it was valued at £76. Lewis refers to it in 1837 as the seat of Lord Carew. Slater refers to it as the residence of Lady Jane Carew in 1894. In 1774, Smith stated that Woodstown was "the house and improvements of Mrs. Matthew". The ITA survey of 1945 stated that it was then owned by the Hearne family but unoccupied and was "suitably situated for a hotel". It was subsequently let to visitors who included, in 1967, Mrs. Jacqueline Kennedy (widow of John F. Kennedy) and her children. In 2011 it was offered for sale.
Woodview In the 1830s a "gentleman's residence" named Woodview already existed here. Slater notes it as the seat of Richard G. Daly in 1846. At the time of Griffith's Valuation Richard Eyre was leasing this property from Richard G. Daly. By 1906 this house had become part of the Pollok estate and was valued at £10. The house is still extant and occupied.
Woodview A house named Wood-view near Cork was occupied by Thomas Cuthbert in 1814. The Reverend William Spedding occupied Woodview in the early 1850s. He held it from Sir George Colthurst and the buildings were valued at £12. A house is still extant at the site.
Woodview Woodview was the home of the Reverend George Nason in 1837 and in the early 1850s was occupied by his son Charles Nason who held the property from Major Edward Croker [Lisfinny]. The buildings were valued at £13+. This house is still a family residence.
Woodview Occupied by Lieutenant F.Prangnall RN in 1837 and held by the Earl of Mountcashel in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £16. 5 shillings. Later occupied by the Smithwick and by the Lucas family in the 20th century until a fire in the 1930s. Recently restored and occupied again.
Woodview A house marked on the first Ordnance Survey map and occupied in 1837 by the Reverend J.P. Lawless. Valued at £18 at the time of Griffith's Valuation, occupied by the Reverend John L. Pyne and held from Mountifort Longfield. The location appears to be occupied by farm buildings now.
Woodview Cottage
Woodview House (Portlaw) Dr. James Martin, MD, was leasing this property from the Malcomson family at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £25. It is still extant and occupied.
Woodville Lewis records Matthew Gibbons [Givens?] as the occupier of this house. Mathew Givens was resident at the time of Griffith's Valuation and held the house valued at £15 from the estate of Reverend John M. Dawson. In 1839 the Ordnance Survey Name Books describe it as "in excellent repair and beautifully ornamented". It is still extant and occupied.
Woodville The residence of the Webb family in the 19th century. The house was valued at £49+ in the early 1850s, occupied by Captain Daniel James Webb and held from Sir John C. Carden. Still a fine residence just south of Templemore.
Woodville Woodville was a home of a branch of the Minchin family from the mid 18th century. The Reverend James Poe was resident at Woodville, Nenagh, in 1814 and Lewis records Humphrey Minchin as the proprietor in 1837. The Ordnance Survey Name Books mention that it had "by far the most beautiful demesne in the parish". He is also recorded as the occupier in Griffith's Valuation when the house was valued at £20.14 shillings and held in fee. When advertised for sale in 1869 James J. Poe was given as the tenant under the Court of Chancery. The house was described as containing a basement story, three large sitting rooms and five principal bedrooms. In 1906 occupied by Alice M.M. Bunbury. George W. Bunbury of Woodville owned 516 acres in the 1870s.
Woodville Woodville was originally a home of the Cummins family. In 1800 Charlotte Cummins married Thomas Mannix. Occupied by N.W. Cummins in 1837 [and by Richard B. Isaack in the early 1850s when it was valued at £23]. Buildings are still extant at the site though extensive modern development has taken place in the area.
Woodville Built as a shooting lodge for the Holmes family, occupied by Richard Sherlock in 1814 and by Captain William Harrington Sherlock at the time of Griffith's Valuation and bought by him in the Encumbered Estates' Court. His daughter married George Washington Brasier Creagh and the house remained in her possession until the 1920s. It is now a Crofts residence.
Woodville Woodville was occupied by the Reverend William Berkley in 1814 and in 1837 by Mrs Gibbons. Anne Gibbings was resident in the 1850s [widow of Bartholomew Gibbings of Gibbings Grove]. She held the property from Martha Jaunsey and the buildings were valued at £17.15 shillings. Her fourth son Robert Gibbings is described as "of Woodville" in Burke's Landed Gentry. A note on the sale rental of 1862 records the purchase of Lot 1 Woodville by Mr Starkey [Dr William Starkey]. The house remained in the possession of the Starkey family until the early 20th century.
Woodville Woodville House is still extant and occupied by the Wood family who operate an open farm there. At the time of Griffith's Valuation, it was being leased by Alicia Martin from Capt. James Wood and was valued at £42.
Woodville Described in 1835 as formerly having good offices and a well-managed garden but had a deserted looking appearance at that time. The Irish Tourist Association survey in 1943 recorded that the ruins of Woodville House were located in the townland of Tawly. The house was demolished around 1908 when the estate was divided.
Woodville Richard Orpen was occupying a property valued at £18 5s at the time of Griffith's Valuation. Lewis also notes it as his residence in 1837. In 1814 Leet recorded it as the seat of Samuel Orpen. Bary states that this house was sometimes known as Cranberry House, though on the Ordnance Survey maps it appears as Woodville. It was occupied by various members of the Orpen family throughout the nineteenth century but is now ruinous.
Woodville (Nohaval) Richard Norris was leasing this property to Rev. John Fitzgerald Day at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £27. Lewis mentions Nohaval House, as the seat of Rev, Fitzgerald, which seems to be the same property. Bary quotes O'Donovan who indicated that this house belonged to the Norris family. She indicates that the house later passed to Fitzgerald-Lombards and Hicksons. It was sold in the early twentieth century and is still extant and occupied.
Woodville House Woodville House is described as "a gentleman's seat, having fine premises and a good deal of woodland attached" in the 1830s. Robert Darcy, who acted as a land agent, was leasing this house from the Clanricarde estate in 1855. In 1906 it was valued at £26. It is still extant and occupied. The walled garden has also been restored and is open to visitors at certain time. See woodvillewalledgarden.com.
Worldsend This house was occupied by Thomas F. Maunsell in 1814 and by James Walplate in the early 1850s. Walplate held the property, valued at £10 and 140 acres from Sir Richard De Burgho. It is still extant and occupied.
Wynnesfort House In 1906 Alexander Lyons owned a property valued at £8 at Rahaberna, barony of Carbury. At the time of Griffith's Valuation this property was leased from the Lyons estate by George Robinson. McTernan states that the lands passed from the Knox to the Wynne estate in the late eighteenth century. In the early nineteenth century William C. Wood of Rathellen had possession and the house was let to a succession of tenants. It was sold in the Encumbered Estates court in 1853 when the purchaser was Henry Lyons.
Youghal House In 1837 Lewis refers to the seat of W.Smithwick "surrounded by thriving plantations". The house was valued at £39 at the time of Griffith's Valuation and held by William Smithwick in fee. The Smithwicks were still resident at Youghal House in the 1970s.
Youghal Lodge Located on the shore of Lough Derg this house is referred to in the Ordnance Survey Name Books in 1840 as Youghal Cottage. However it appears on both the 2st and 25-inch edition maps as Youghal Lodge. At that time it was owned by William Smithwich but Captain Barton was living there. It was occupied by Scrope Bernard at the time of Griffith's Valuation. He held the property from William Smithwick and the house was valued at £19+. A building is still located at this site.
Youghals House A Miss Walsh was leasing this property from the Earl of Shannon's estate at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £14. This house is still extant.
Young Grove Mrs Foulke was resident in 1814 and C. Foulke in 1837. At the time of Griffith's Valuation John Turpin held the property in fee and the buildings were valued at £50. Margaret T. Turpin was resident in 1906 when the buildings were valued at £45.10 shillings.