Landed Estates
NUI Galway

Naper/Napper

Description

Drewstown, county Westmeath.


Estate(s)

Name Description
Bermingham/Birmingham (Rosshill) Colonel John Browne owned a substantial estate in the barony of Ross, county Galway, at the end of the 17th century, which the trustees for the sale of his estates sold to James Naper and Thomas Smith in June 1700. The estate was immediately leased back to Peter Browne, son and heir of the Colonel. During the 18th century Peter Browne's lease (renewable for ever) of the estate became vested in the descendants of his sister Elizabeth who had married John Bermingham, a cousin of Baron Athenry. In the 19th century the estate became the joint property of the Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont through their marriages with the daughters and heiresses of William Bermingham of Ross, who died in 1799.
Naper/Napper In 1700 James Naper of Drewstown, county Meath, in partnership with Thomas Smith, bought the Ross estate in county Galway from Colonel John Browne of Westport, county Mayo. Naper's interest became vested in James Lennox Dutton and subsequently in his son Lord Sherborne to whom the Berminghams and later the Earls of Leitrim paid headrent. Details of the tenure of the Earls of Charlemont and Leitrim with regard to the Naper and Smith moieties is given in the sale rental of 28 June 1860. By the early 1860s the Naper interest was vested in Lord Dunsany and his trustees advertised it for sale in the Landed Estates' Court in 1863.
Smith (Ross) In 1700 Thomas Smith, in partnership with James Naper, bought the Ross estate in county Galway from Colonel John Browne of Westport, county Mayo. Smith's interest became vested in George Boleyn Whitney to whom the Berminghams and later the Earls of Leitrim paid headrent. Details of the tenure of the Earls of Charlemont and Leitrim with regard to the Naper and Smith moieties is given in the sale rental of 28 June 1860.
Ingoldsby (Cos Limerick & Clare) Henry and George Ingoldsby were Cromwellian soldiers who settled in county Limerick where they were granted lands in the mid 17th century. They were sons of Richard Ingoldsby and Elizabeth Cromwell. Henry Ingoldsby married a daughter of Sir Hardress Waller and George married Mary Gould, daughter of J. Goold and Thomasin daughter of Sir Thomas Browne of Hospital, county Limerick. Sir George Ingoldsby by his marriage to Mary Goold came to possess the lands of Corbally, north of Limerick city. The Reverend Fitzgerald records that he was also granted Ballybricken castle in the parish of Ludden, barony of Clanwilliam and a large tract of land around it. In 1712 his daughter Barbara married William Smythe of Barbavilla, county Westmeath. His son Richard Ingoldsby bought Carton in county Kildare in 1703 and represented Limerick city in Parliament from 1703 to 1712. Richard married Frances Naper of Loughcrew, county Meath and they had an only son Henry, who married a daughter of Sir Constantine Phipps. Henry Ingoldsby was a Lord Justice of Ireland and was Member of Parliament for Limerick city 1713-1714 and 1727-1731. He died in 1731 leaving two daughters Catherine and Frances his co heiresses. In 1734 Catherine married her cousin James Lennox Naper (later Dutton) of Loughcrew, a landowner in counties Meath and Westmeath. She died in 1742 leaving a son John Dutton, who died unmarried. By the 1730s the Ingoldsby estates were heavily encumbered, Carton was sold in 1738 to the Earl of Kildare. Frances was sent to live with her cousins the Blennerhassetts at Riddlestown, parish of Doondonnell, county Limerick. In 1743 she was abducted by Hugh Fitzjohn Massy (a first cousin of the 1st Baron Massy) from the rectory at Nantinan, barony of Connello Lower, where she was staying with the rector Reverend Thomas Royse and his wife, who had Ingoldsby connections. Frances and Hugh were married and he acquired the Limerick estates of his wife. They had a son and a daughter. The son Hugh Ingoldsby Massy of New-Garden married Anne Nash in 1769 and they had a son also named Hugh Ingoldsby Massy. Sir George Ingoldsby's brother Henry Ingoldsby also became a baronet and was granted many denominations of land under the Cromwellian settlement in county Clare. Lodge refers to Charles Ingoldsby of Clonderalagh, county Clare, a younger son of Sir Henry Ingoldsby of Beggstown, county Meath. Charles Ingoldsby held an estate in the barony of Clonderalaw, county Clare at the beginning of the 18th century. His daughter Angel or Anne married Robert Dillon 7th Earl of Roscommon.