Landed Estates
NUI Galway

Irwin (Flower Hill)

Description

Flower Hill, Ballymote


Estate(s)

Name Description
Irwin (Flower Hill) The representatives of Thomas R.T, Irwin held lands at Harristown, parish of Kilshalvy and barony of Corran at the time of Griffith's Valuation. This property was offered for sale in the Encumbered Estates Court in January 1858 and February 1860. The original lease, dated 1777, was between William Phibbs and Henry Irwin. The property was offered for sale again in the Landed Estates Court in June 1865 by John Cogan, brother of James Cogan, who had purchased it under the earlier sale.
Cogan (Rockbrook) The Cogan family occupied a property which in the early 18th century had belonged to the Phibbs family. The property at Rockbrook is listed as being part of the Martin estate in the OS Name Books in 1836. The property at Lisconny passed by inheritence to Lady Norbury whose mother had been a member of the Phibbs family. This property seems to have been occupied by Robert Baker in 1814. In June 1865 John Cogan offered for sale the estate at Flower Hill in the barony of Corran, formerly the property of the Irwin family. The particulars indicate that the estate had been purchased in the Landed Estates Court by James Cogan, brother of John. In 1866 Bernard Cogan was the petitioner in the sale of property belonging to Timothy O'Donel in the Landed Estates Court. He purchased lands in Tourlestrane for £120 in this sale. Harloe Phibbs and James Cogan are jointly listed as the owners of over 2200 acres in county Sligo in 1876. At the same time Bernard Owen Cogan was the owner of over 1000 acres. In the 1870s Patrick Cogan was recorded as the owner of over 800 acres in county Sligo. At the time of Griffith's Valuation the representatives of Patrick Cogan were the lessors of property in the parish of Kilcolman, barony of Coolavin. In the Land Judges' Court in 1890 E.C. Cogan sold lands at Heapstown. McTernan notes that the Cogans were one of the principal Catholic landowning families in county Sligo in the nineteenth century.